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I recently purchased an oil filter and changed the oil on my Yanmar 1gm. I overfilled the oil and ran the motor afterwards. After bogging down with increased rpm I checked oil again to discover I had overfilled.
I removed oil down to half way of stick but still I bog down.
Is my problem a bad oil filter? Did I damage something? Would changing fuel filter remedy as increased throttle chokes motor down? Do I need a pro out to diagnose and repair?
Bayfield 25 in Charleston
 

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"Bog down"? will it reach max rpm as it did before you changed the oil? Is there much exhaust smoke? Any other work done at the same time? Is the oil pressure the same as before? some filters may have differing relief valves.

Maybe excess oil has accumulated in the crankcase breather system, causing an "extra fuel" condition? Let us know what you find.

Paul T
 

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It will not reach max rpm as before. It starts right up but then any throttle above idle causes it to die and shut off as if it is flooding out. The oil pressure light does not come on and I do not have a pressure gauge.
No exhaust smoke and not sure how to check crankcase breather.
Thanks for your reply.
 

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It will not reach max rpm as before. It starts right up but then any throttle above idle causes it to die and shut off as if it is flooding out. The oil pressure light does not come on and I do not have a pressure gauge.
No exhaust smoke and not sure how to check crankcase breather.
Thanks for your reply.
Pull the filter head/cover off your air intake and check the core. It may be sufficiently saturated with oil forced through the breather tube that it will not allow enough air to be drawn into the engine to support higher rpm combustion. Replacing the filter core is pretty easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks. I will try this. So I need to purchase a new "filter core" and replace it for a probable solution?
 

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Thanks. I will try this. So I need to purchase a new "filter core" and replace it for a probable solution?
No hands on experience with your specific engine. You may have a rubber hose, about 1" in diameter, that runs from the valve cover to the intake tract, either before or after the air filter. As SV said, it may have plugged up the air filter? If it is not smoking excessively, it may be starving for air.

Oil may accumulate in any low spot in the crankcase breather hose or in the intake tract. The air filter is a likely suspect. No other work done at the same time?

Paul T
 

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Discussion Starter #7
No other work done except to change oil filter. Have not changed fuel filter and not wanting to yet unless need be.
 

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No other work done except to change oil filter. Have not changed fuel filter and not wanting to yet unless need be.
OK, kind of looks like the extra oil may have found it's way into the intake tract, as SV mentioned. I doubt that the oil filter capacity would vary that much to effect anything.

As mentioned, different filters may have different pressure relief values, but I doubt that would cause your stalling problems unless you have a system that senses low pressure and attempts to shut down the engine. Probably a stretch, however, you might try a genuine Yanmar filter. I have read about some high pressure injector pumps being operated by the engine oil pressure, don't know about Yanmar?

Likely it may be excess oil somewhere in the intake tract.

Paul T
 

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Thanks. I will try this. So I need to purchase a new "filter core" and replace it for a probable solution?
The intake filter on the 1GM is on the aft side of the engine, above the bell housing/transmission and somewhat resembles a pot with a long snout, normally facing downward. A couple of cam-lock latches hold it in place. The filter core is either foam or in some cases paper with an accordion fold. In either case, the core can become saturated with oil from the breather tube, which plugs into the side of the filter housing. Frankly the 1 and 2GM motors are pretty idiot proof and very reliable so I would be surprised if you have done any more than foul the intake filter. In future, pay attention to the oil capacity of the motor and the amount you remove during an oil change, including about 1/2-2/3'rds of a quart for the filter canister, assuming you are also replacing the filter. N'any case, don't worry about it. Other's have done worse.

FWIW...
 

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Sounds like SV has "been there & done that". If the air filter is clean & no oil accumulating, MAYBE, a real stretch, your fuel filter has just decided to pack it in? I can't think of anything else, maybe tank vent , air leak, or other "normal" fuel system related problems. Curious to know what you find. I am assuming it stalls when out of gear?

Paul T
 

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As a follow up to my earlier comment concerning obstruction of the Air Filter element, it occurred to me that if that is not the problem; and, you have 500 or more hours on the mixing elbow, the excess oil sucked into the air intake may have created enough "coking" to have badly, if not nearly completely obstructed your mixing elbow which would cause symptoms similar to what you describe.

FWIW, the replacement interval on the 1GM & 2GM elbows is 500 hours. With that much time or more, one commonly finds that the elbow is almost completely obstructed. A bit of excess discharge from the engine at such a point could have pushed the elbow over the edge. (Some years ago we towed a friend's boat into Key West after he experienced similar issues with a 2GM. Upon pulling the Elbow it was nearly completely obstructed. Several-dirty-hours later with a drumel tool and a rat-tail file he was back in business and owed me a bottle of Scotch as payoff on a bet we made that a obstruction was the problem.)

If the foregoing or the fouling/obstruction of the air filter element are not the source of the problem, I'm out of ideas and you'll need to speak with someone like Maine Sail who actually knows of which he speaks.

Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ok, I checked the air intake element. There is not one! Just an old rusty grid, perhaps he structure for the foam element. No oil accumulation. Starts okay, though seeming to be a little less responsive with more grinding turns than previous quick start.
After starting she idles fine but increasing rpm bogs her down.
As to fuel filter, my thoughts keep going there, but what a waste of time if indeed it is a mixing elbow.
What are steps to clean out mixing elbow when in the water? Can I do it b simply shutting off seawater valve?
 

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Ok, I checked the air intake element. There is not one! Just an old rusty grid, perhaps he structure for the foam element. No oil accumulation. Starts okay, though seeming to be a little less responsive with more grinding turns than previous quick start.
After starting she idles fine but increasing rpm bogs her down.
As to fuel filter, my thoughts keep going there, but what a waste of time if indeed it is a mixing elbow.
What are steps to clean out mixing elbow when in the water? Can I do it b simply shutting off seawater valve?
Charleston--

Perfectly frankly, I am the last person that should be giving advice on engine maintenance. That said, the Mixing Elbow on the 1 GM10 is pretty easily removed but something of a pain to clean out. The raw water intake need not be closed. For more on the subject see (click on) this 1 GM Mixing Elbow thread. Look closely at the photos. I suspect your oil was sucked through the intake and blown right into the elbow. I suggest you also look into obtaining a proper filter element.
 

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Maybe changing the fuel filter first would be easier and you would end up with a new filter, not much to lose. You might check your tank vent, hoses, fittings, etc., maybe an air leak. It seems to point to a fuel related problem, maybe happening at the same time as the oil change. Maybe you bumped a fitting or fuel line?

Paul T
 

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The suggestions that have been made are all good ones, but "diagnosing" your engine problem by finding out what my problem was is like playing darts in a dark room. You could get a bullseye, but usually not for a long time! An engine is a fire, it needs three things, fuel, air, ignition source. Start with a plan and check each system. On a diesel, ignition is from compression. I know Cat 30's had YSM12's at one point. Are you sure its a 1GM? The YSM has a compression release lever for hand cranking, make sure it is in the right position. Ditto the kill cable. Trace your fuel lines, fuel in tank? fuel at water separator? fuel at lift pump? fuel at injector? You can pull the injector (two bolts) but be VERY careful about that. I wouldn't go there yet. Then check that the air intake and exhaust is clear. As a WAG, fuel would be my 1st guess (it starts and runs), make sure it is clean, uncontaminated and air free. That sounds easy, but a loose banjo bolt or a bad gasket can let in enough air to stall it. Second guess is back pressure from clogged exhaust elbows. The YSM has a funky 3 bolt exhaust "manifold". The top bolt is partially shrouded and difficult to get a good bite with a socket, so be careful. YSMs are loud and vibrate a lot, which means folks turn them off as quickly as possible, conditions leading to carbon build up. The YSM operators and shop manuals are available free on line. If you can't find them, drop me a PM and I'll email the PDF files. YSMs are horrid engines, ugly, noisy, heavy and will rattle the fillings out of your teeth. They use next to no fuel, produce barrels or torque and you need a sledge hammer to kill them, which makes you love them after a while.
Sorry if this is overly long and overly didactic.
Lou
 
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