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I found an artist in Baltimore who works in bronze and other metals. I would bet he could fabricate what you need. He does some amazing work.

He was going to hand forge my chainplates when I was still going to do them outboard (not going to now though). I'll ask him when I talk to him next if it's ok to give out his number to you if you like. Let me know.
That would be good. I will be in Baltimore this summer.

Brian: I will take some pics this weekend. Thinking about why the chain plates are twisted- I am not quite sure why. They attach to interior bulkhead, then through the deck, then they twist 90 deg, you comment on the toggles is correct. I will take a pic.
 

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Casey

Here is what I mean. In the pic it doesn't matter which way the chainplate is, fore and aft as shown or sideways. The turnbuckle eye will turn to suit either.

My chainplates are attached to the main bulkhead and are not twisted either.
 

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Yea, I would need a rectangular section. The thing is I need it turned where the toggle connects 90 degree, and previous poster said this is not good to do with bronze, although it looks like that is what they did with my existing SS chain plates.
Thanks
Check these several web sites for bronze fabrication. It is possible to weld silicon bronze

flat bar available on the following sites
Atlas Metal Sales

call for available sizes
C65500 Silicon Bronze - Everdur

Call for available sizes
Bronze Bar
 

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Casey

Here is what I mean. In the pic it doesn't matter which way the chainplate is, fore and aft as shown or sideways. The turnbuckle eye will turn to suit either.

My chainplates are attached to the main bulkhead and are not twisted either.
I was mistaken, my chain plates are not turned. A strait bar would work. In the next few years I plan to replace with bronz. Maybe also use bronze nuts/bolts.

How do you keep your stainless looking so good? The ring instead of cotter pin looks good, why not also use a ring instead of cotter pin on the pin connector?
 

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That is not my boat, but a neighbor's Westsail 32. Even though his rig looks pretty good it will all be replaced in the next few months before he heads offshore.
You could use a ring on the lower pin. A cotter pin is ok if put on properly - ends bent only about 15 degrees and a dab of silicone on them. Most people bend them way too far so you need pliers to remove them.
My boat is much worse and it will get new wire, turnbuckles, and toggles soon. This was a prettier example.
 

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That is not my boat, but a neighbor's Westsail 32. Even though his rig looks pretty good it will all be replaced in the next few months before he heads offshore.
You could use a ring on the lower pin. A cotter pin is ok if put on properly - ends bent only about 15 degrees and a dab of silicone on them. Most people bend them way too far so you need pliers to remove them.
My boat is much worse and it will get new wire, turnbuckles, and toggles soon. This was a prettier example.
It seems the rings would be best- less things to get cut on. Why dab silicone on the cotter? Do you mean silicone caulk?
 

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That is not my boat, but a neighbor's Westsail 32. Even though his rig looks pretty good it will all be replaced in the next few months before he heads offshore.
Just curious why he will replace all rigging. Is it just old? Would he go with Bronze chain plates? This is what I do not understand about stainless- seems you cannot really trust the stuff. By inspecting you cannot really tell if it is about to break. So then the question how often do you replace it? I was thinking even the boats Columbus and Magelan sailed were probably better than the better than todays "yachts" - they never had to worry about creavice corrosion (although I guess they had a lot of other things to worry about).
 

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You put a dab of silicone sealant on the sharp ends of the cotter pin after opening them about 15 degrees. That is all they have to be opened otherwise they are hard to remove. The silicone covers the sharp points. That advice came from Rod Stephens, Olin's brother.
My neighbor is heading offshore and while his rigging looks good, it is about 25 years old as far as he can tell. He will keep the stainless chainplates. They are mounted outside on the hull so not at risk from crevice corrosion and can easily be inspected. If suspect dye works well to show cracks that are too small to see otherwise.
Stainless in open air has few issues with corrosion. It is the stainless in a damp area without oxygen that has problems. A chainplate that goes through a deck that has wet core is one problem area, as is the part of a driveshaft that is in the cutlass bearing. But visible chainplates like the pic above, stanchions and other deck hardware in open air are very durable.
Bronze tends to suit a boat like a Bristol Channel Cutter, Nor'Sea 27 or other traditional designs. Stainless suits a more modern looking design.
Things are changing though, first on the racers but it will trickle down. Synthetic rigging like Dynex Dux is gaining popularity and costs about the same as stainless. Carbon fiber is replacing metal in some cases, and not just for masts and booms. And look at the non-corroding chainplate below as well as the stanchion mounting.
 

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Stainless in open air has few issues with corrosion. It is the stainless in a damp area without oxygen that has problems.
Here is my problem. I have stainless keel bolts holding a cast lead keel. The top of the bolt and nut sit in my bilge. I get salt water in the bilge from shat seal and also minor leaks while in heavy seas. Will this salt water cause crevice corrosion on the keel bolts? The bolts are 30 years old and passed surveyors inspection so they seem ok. Originally the bolts had epoxy on the portion in the keel to seal them but that eventually chipped away in some areas. When my bilge pump runs and then stops in airates the water with oxygen so would this be enough to keep the stainless from getting crevice corrosion? Should I encapsulate with epoxy- I heard if the encapsulation is not 100% it can lead to more problems than leaving them open.
 

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Encapsulation of the visible parts of the keel bolts is the problem. Leave them uncovered, keep them clean and try to keep the bilge dry, at least sometimes.
 

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Encapsulation of the visible parts of the keel bolts is the problem. Leave them uncovered, keep them clean and try to keep the bilge dry, at least sometimes.
Roger that, I am going to try to set up a bilge pump that will take care of the shaft seal water before it even hits the bilge. This should take care of a lot of the water.
 

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One possible solution is to glass in a bit of a dam to keep the daily drips from the stuffing box in the aft part of the bilge, but low enough that a flood would fill the main bilge. Then the main bilge over the keel bolts could be kept dry with a sponge after it is pumped out. A small low profile pump could be used in the aft section, like the Whale Supersub. A stuffing box that only drips when the engine is running helps as well.

Nice boat - I see it is back in production. Introducing THE NEW S&S 34

No desire to sail around nonstop? It seems to be a popular choice for that.:D
 

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One possible solution is to glass in a bit of a dam to keep the daily drips from the stuffing box in the aft part of the bilge, but low enough that a flood would fill the main bilge. Then the main bilge over the keel bolts could be kept dry with a sponge after it is pumped out. A small low profile pump could be used in the aft section, like the Whale Supersub. A stuffing box that only drips when the engine is running helps as well.

Nice boat - I see it is back in production. Introducing THE NEW S&S 34

No desire to sail around nonstop? It seems to be a popular choice for that.:D
Thanks for the ideas. I may try a non stop, but I have a 4 and 6 year old now and they need to get a bit older, the wife would not allow me to be gone for the 11 months or so, but that also gives me some time to prepare the boat. Whenever I take the boat out, and the kids are acting up, I tell my wife "I might not be back".
 
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