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Very big, very complicated boat. I remember another old timer recently trying to do the same thing, in another big and complicated boat, only to turn around and go back due to various failures and injuries. But I wish him all the best!
You're probably thinking of Paris' failed first attempt, last year...

Hope he rigs a preventer, and has a lighter touch on the electric winch control buttons, this time around...

:)



Hope he makes it this time, but takes one day longer than Dodge Morgan did... :)

And I'm sorry, but the notion that an epoxy boat costing close to $3 million represents a "COMPLETELY GREEN" endeavor - simply because he's not burning any fuel underway - is laughable...
 

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Not sure what your point is about the Green endeavor? BTW, it's not like Dodge Morgan was on a tight budget...

From Dodge Morgan, first American to circumnavigate globe alone, dies at 78 -

"He commissioned renowned naval architect Ted Hood to design American Promise, a rugged, $1.5 million vessel made virtually unsinkable with watertight compartments and submarine-esque doors. Mr. Morgan armed his single-masted sailboat with the latest in high-tech gear, and he avoided the need for repairs by outfitting it with two of everything: two sets of sails, two rudders, two satellite navigational systems and two machines to convert salt water into fresh water. "

Hey, racing around the world ain't cheap.

Anyway, records are made to be broken, so let's wish the new challenger all the best.

Ralph
The budget has little to do with it, I just think given the amount of petro-chemicals involved, and hydrocarbons burned in the construction of a 58-foot epoxy and carbon fiber yacht, high tech laminate sails, etc, projects like this are far from being truly "Green"...

I think he's also seriously handicapping himself by trying to avoid the use of propane for cooking, or any other type of fuel... It certainly proved to be a problem on his first attempt, having to generate electricity to prepare hot meals or drinks... He had to average 9 knots for his hydrogenerators to keep up with the electrical demands of the boat, anything less than that for any prolonged period of time, and he couldn't cook... Seems pretty dumb, to me...

Paris is a very impressive guy who has accomplished a great deal in his life, no question... But some who have followed this project closely question his tendency to have left so much of the prep of the boat in the hands of others, quite the opposite of the approach taken by Dodge Morgan (his book AMERICAN PROMISE is a surprisingly good read, btw) Some of his problems on his first attempt seem to have revealed a lack of familiarity with certain aspects of the boat and how she needed to be sailed, hopefully he's a bit more acquainted with her by now...
 

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Oh yes, it IS the same old dude...
He has grit, I give him that, but he does not seem to be learning from his lessons. He has another grossly over-contraptionalized boat that is definitely going to be a handful for him to handle in a blow. And again, no shake-down sea trial for his boat.
I think the 1,200 mile trip from New England down to St Augustine was his shake-down...

2 of his very expensive Watt & Sea hydrogenerators bit the dust on that trip... Hopefully their replacements will make it a bit deeper into the next 27,000 miles... :)
 

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I think you'd be hard pressed to carry the stores and spares needed for a non-stop circumnavigation on a 36 foot boat. Sir Francis Chichester's gin alone would have required more space than any 36 footer could offer.
Well, people like Jon Sanders and Jessica Watson have managed to do so on their 34-footers... Main issue for a guy like Paris, is that a Morris Justine ain't gonna beat Dodge Morgan's "Record"...

:)
 

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We were in Florida just a week before he departed and went out of our way to travel to St. Augustine to get a glimpse of the boat, which, as it turns out, was not at a public dock. We had to do some interesting walks to get near enough to see it. I'm excited for his attempt and wish him all the best--I think he's raised quite a bit of money for the Foundation for Physical Therapy. His abilities are unquestionable but the boat, well, let's hope she's as strong as he is!
I don't know, that boat beat him up pretty good last time out... :)

The original intent was to have only one electric winch on KIWI SPIRIT, primarily for the main halyard... After the initial sea trials, however, they deemed it necessary to add electric primaries and others for him to be able to handle the sail plan... Seems an example of how the complexity of the boat increased, as the project progressed...

I'm quite a bit younger than Mr Paris, and consider myself to be reasonably fit and strong, and have a fair bit of experience singlehanding... However, I cannot begin to imagine sailing such a powerful boat RTW non-stop, thru the Southern Ocean...

I'm no Robin Knox-Johnston, that's for sure... :)) Nothing against Mr Paris, but I'm not sure he is, either...
 

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No doubt, he has faith in the boat. His words - 60% boat, 20% sailor, and 20% luck. Anyone disagree?

Ralph
I'd probably be a bit more inclined to go with 33.333% for each... :)

Looks like Donna Lange is gearing up for another go-around next year, this time a non-stopper on her Southern Cross 28:

Sail Twice Around

But I believe she already has a singular accomplishment that will NEVER be matched by anyone:

Only Woman to Circumnavigate Solo, who has a daughter named PTARMIGAN...

:))
 

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After reading that blog again, I got it wrong. It was the project manager that gave those numbers.

"So in just 1,200 miles and with some 29,000 miles to go I have had once again some major problems. Optimistically I assure myself that these breakages are good for we will get them right. I carry spares for almost everything and I added two more manual winches in anticipation of the above problems. But still I have to say that there is a vast difference between a day sailor or an occasional off shore cruiser to what It is I am planning for - a non-stop global circumnavigation during which I cannot put into port, receive any help, spare parts etc. I must be totally independent. Hence I have to say that I don't think many who manufacture the gear and work in the trade really get it. Just not enough reliability in the system.

Steve Pettengill, my project manager, may have it right when he says its 60% the boat, 20% the sailor and 20% luck. I am inclined to agree."

Ralph
Well, if anyone should know, it's Steve Pettengill... But I still think he's way understating the role of the sailor, as his personal effort keeping his B&R rig standing en route to a 2nd place finish in one of the Around Alone races years ago was truly the stuff of legend...

Wow, KIWI SPIRIT is an energy hog, alright, and her dependence on those hydrogenerators is a frightening prospect, seems to me:

From St. Augustine to round Bermuda took six days. Alarm rang every hour and my first job was to clean the two hydro generators from masses of sargassum that was clogging then up. No sooner would I lower the first and start on the second it would often clog again. I just could not generate the power I needed. The batteries steadily declined from 100% when leaving St. Augustine to 20% rounding Bermuda. This meant no hot water, no refrigeration, freezer sealed shut but still the battery power dropped. Rounding Bermuda that all began to change, less sargassum and power has started to build again.

Sargassum, Water Ballast and an Uncomfortable Night | Dr. Stanley Paris ? Kiwi Spirit, a custom designed 63-foot yacht
In addition, seems awfully early in the trip to have his autopilot acting up... And, TEN DAYS without a hot shower, while aboard a $Multi-million 63-footer ??? Small price to pay for going "Green", I suppose... :))

Not to mention, he hasn't exactly been heading in the right direction, of late... I wonder why he's not on port tack, instead? Illustrative of the issue with his water ballast pump, I suppose?

Hope things start turning around for him, soon...

 

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I just dont get it...really 63 footer multimillion dollar investment and he has the same issues joe blow aka us have or WORSE when shaking off on a new cruise and or boat
One difference I'm seeing between him, and guys like you and me...

Few of us have "Shore Support Teams" that we can email, or ring up on the satphone, to instruct us how to troubleshoot a water pump...

:))
 

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ja wouldnt that be just delightful? jajajajajaja

"shore team my espresso machine stopped working please ship overnight air and parachute drop by the am please"

roger that

JAJAJAJAJAJAJAJAJA
Not all that far-fetched, actually...

Pictured below is the galley on a Trintella 50 I used to deliver (photo by Billy Black)... Above the stove is a single-cup cappucino machine from Miele. Amazing thing to have aboard, it always got a very heavy workout on our trips... Pretty silly and indulgent to have to furl the jib when hard on the breeze to reduce the heel sufficiently to brew a cappucino, but with twin Reckmann electric furlers up forward, all it took was the push of a button... :))

The thing used these specialized cannisters from Nespresso. Probably easy to find nowadays, but back then they weren't very easy to find, and the owner had to order them in bulk from some specialized coffee supplier...

One year before heading south from Annapolis, we discovered the onboard coffee supply had run dangerously low... Well, to be honest, there might have been enough to get us to Charleston, but the only flavor left was unappealing to both of us, our favorites were definitely gone...

Fortunately, we had a lengthy weather window before us... So, we actually delayed our departure until the following day, so the owner could have a fresh supply overnighted via FedEx Priority AM delivery...

Damn, I miss running that boat, for that gentleman... No expense, or indulgence, was ever spared. :)) A wonderful client, I ran a succession of his boats for over 25 years, but he now has a Hinckley Talaria jet boat that makes the trip north and south by truck...

 

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I question why folks climb mt Everest. It is not only freakin cold, but you have a constant headache from the low oxygen level. On top of that quite a few peeps die trying each year. And for what they pay for this experience, you could have a nice boat. But I do not think sir Hilary would agree with my train of thought.
Well, I wouldn't place any bets on what Sir Edmund would think of the 'Climbing Rallies' up Everest, today... :)



And if Abby Southerland had used an s&s 34, she would have had a much better chance with her lap, as Jessica Watson had done.
Not necessarily... And she would have lessened her chances of breaking "The Record", which is what these things are about, after all...

What ultimately did her in was running late in the season, and leaving Capetown dangerously close to the onset of the southern hemisphere winter... a dicey decision, no matter what she was sailing...
 

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Uh-oh...

One autopilot down, 2 to go...

man, you gotta love a boat that is so complex, that the AP keeps trying to function after the main breaker is turned off...

"Open the pod bay door, Hal..."

:))

On the first attempt last year the challenges I had to continuing were mainly mechanical: loss of battens from the sail, damaged staysail furling, extensive damage to the end of the boom. These I repaired and felt comfortable they would not be show stoppers. However it was the failure of the fixtures that hold the shrouds that support the mast that caused the alarm. Farr Yacht Design said they were unsafe and that I had to quit - soon all team members agreed and so I put in to Cape Town.

This time it's the electronics that are taking a toll. I have two sets of winds instruments atop the mast. They give both wind speed and true wind direction. One set has failed and I am on the second set - so soon. Next I have three auto pilots and now one, the primary Auto Pilot has given up the ghost. Let's hope I have seen the last of my electronics problems, but I fear not.

The autopilot did not quietly into the night. Once it failed it simply would not turn off at the breaker on the electrical panel and kept sending out load beeps every seven seconds. Then for no reason at all, perhaps I was being too calm about it all, the dying Auto decided to sound the Man Overboard alarm which really screeches. When I finally figured out to turn it off, it found another way of coming on. Eventually however it totally died and I had peace and quiet.

My Project Manager Steve Pettengill said "Look after the boat and it will look after you." Believe me Steve, I am doing my best but while I am somewhat mechanical, electronics are just a black box to me.

Attrition and Black Boxes | Dr. Stanley Paris ? Kiwi Spirit, a custom designed 63-foot yacht
 

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An audible man overboard alarm on a singlehanded boat? Thats kinda funny..
Well, in fairness, the boat isn't always being singlehanded... :)

Her first major shakedown was the Bermuda 1-2, when he had his son Alan along on the return leg...

And, he has always intended to cruise the boat with his wife and family or friends after this trip, so...

Look closely, you'll see he also carries a Lifesling, and what appears to be a MOB module...



Even for a solo sailor, however, such gear is not necessarily superfluous... As one who does a fair amount of singlehanding, I'm occasionally ribbed about carrying a Lifesling... As in, "What's the point?" However, You Never Know... Although it's unlikely Paris might need either on this particular voyage, it's not hard to imagine the variety of circumstances where any singlehanded cruiser might need such gear to assist a person in the water from a vessel other than his own...
 

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Agree, I looked at their web site and they must have a good history of reliability. Kiwi must just have a bad batch. Needed to burn those things in for six months to be sure they don't break prior to departure.
A "bad batch"? Like, a tin of blueberry muffins that came out of the oven burnt? Hmmm, sounds a bit unlikely, to me... :))

A problem with the installation sounds more likely, to me... After all, an AP wired correctly should shut down when the breaker is tripped at the main panel, no?
 

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Jon, do you ever wonder why, when there is a electronic product recall, they give you serial number range? Could that be a batch number?
Good point... Your guess might be better than mine, in that regard :)

Also I see where some nke aps have built in 12vdc to 12 Vic power supplies and include power conditioning. This may account for the delayed power shut down of the electronics. Looking at nke manual, the ap has 2 power supplies, one to hyd pump and other to the computer. They must. Be tuned on/off in correct sequence. This could also be part of problem. Not familiar with the unit.
Again, another good point... However, according to Paris' account, it seemed to take an abnormally LOOOONG time for him to finally disable the thing... There's a Poltergeist aboard KIWI SPIRIT, perhaps? :)

And if you think failures of nke ap are that rare, do a search of nke ap failures. There are many, some leading to crash jibes and knock downs. They may be excellent, but everything breaks at some point.
Of course... However, I still rate them as highly reliable as autopilots go, especially given the demanding applications they typically see...

BTW, a Google search of "NKE autopilot failures" produces 69,000 hits...

Substitute "Raymarine" for NKE, the number spikes to 388,000...

:))
 

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Stick a fork in him, he's done... Coincidentally, very close to the same area his first attempt was aborted, as well... too bad, gotta give him credit for his attitude in the face of this disappointment...

Not the greatest endorsement for North 3Di sails, it would appear... Although, I can't help but wonder if there might have been a bit of 'operator error' that contributed to this failure, as well...

Note to Self: No matter how much money you might ever acquire, never, EVER buy a boat the size of which the mainsail is beyond your capability to at least attempt to effect a repair at sea...

Not to mention, never, ever attempt a voyage FOR WHICH THE SOLE PURPOSE IS THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SOME RECORD... The guy has spent millions building his vision of The Ultimate Globe Girdler... No reason he couldn't put into Cape Town, have the main repaired, and resume his circumnavigation... But no, this clearly is not about sailing around the world, but rather about making it into The Record Book... Once that is taken off the table, what's the point? Apparently the achievement and satisfaction of a solo circumnavigation alone is not sufficient, for him...

I'll bet Dodge Morgan would have kept going... So, I'm glad 'the Record' remains his...

:))

Once again my attempt to complete a solo circumnavigation has come to an end. On Xmas Eve the top quarter of the mail sail separated along a seam from the rest of the sail. This is not repairable by me at sea and given the gales I can expect before I round the tip of South Africa it is once again not advisable to continue. This is of course is a big disappointment to me and too many who have wished me well. But that is life. I have never let difficulties get in my way of trying something worthwhile. I am always aware that failure can occur but I have never let the fear of failure deter or prevent me from trying. To do so would be to accept mediocrity and that I will never do.

To all who wished me well, family, friends, colleagues and school children I am sorry to disappoint you yet once again and wish you all well in following your dreams.

Now I head for Cape Town, South Africa where once again repairs will be undertaken and later a crew will bring Kiwi Spirit, such a wonderful boat, back to the United States.

I am 680 miles from Cape Town and expect to be there in about five days going quite slow to conserve a limited fuel supply.

Kindest regards and best wishes for the holiday season.

Game Over ? Headed for Cape Town Again | Dr. Stanley Paris ? Kiwi Spirit, a custom designed 63-foot yacht
 

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You gotta admit this guy had a dream,did his best to actuate his dream and has great courage. I applaud him. There are too few people like him.
Fair enough, and on a certain level I have a huge amount of respect for the guy... But what is most striking to me about this whole venture, is how little it apparently has to do with SAILING, and more about his personal quest for some sort of recognition... Frankly, these days I think we need more people who - having the "Dream" of sailing around the world - might be willing to do so in relative obscurity, and purely for their own pleasure and satisfaction in the accomplishment... Paris reminds me more of those 'mountaineers' paying big bucks to be guided to the summit of Everest, but will never climb another mountain again... :))

Hell, he could still lay claim to being the first to do a "Green" solo circumnavigation, without the aid of any fossil fuels whatsoever, no? Although, anyone else catch the irony that one of his primary concerns in getting his vaunted Green Machine into Cape Town without his main is "conserving his fuel"? :))

Obviously, the guy is hugely disappointed, and his attitude in the face of that is admirable... But what I can't understand, is why not after the repair is made in Cape Town, at least sail KIWI SPIRIT back home HIMSELF, or with crew to assist? He's looking at one of the great ocean passages on the planet, Cape Town to the Caribbean, with the possibility of stopping in St Helena along the way, one of the more intriguing places one can possibly sail to on earth, then the balance of the season to be spent in the Caribbean... Hell, it's not like he hasn't already budgeted the time to do so, and yet it sounds as if a delivery crew will be bringing the boat back home? I just don't get it...

Nope, this one was never about the Sailing, or the "Dream" of sailing around the world...
 

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Interesting that with all the money in the game, and support team, no to have a spare main sail. They took care of many little details, but forgot the important ones.
Yup, unfathomable, to say the least...

However, I reckon that to be the chance he took, going with a boat of that size... I seriously doubt I'd be able to bend on a replacement full-battened main of that size (approx 1300 sq ft) by myself, at sea... That thing has to weigh 200 pounds, at least...

And, certainly not at age 74... :)

On his first attempt, his Code 0 flogged itself to death one night, as he was for some reason unable to furl it... Too much boat, too little muscle, not a great combination, especially for a solo sailor...

Unless you're French, I suppose...

:))
 

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How much do you think that boat will go for now that it's used -:)
$500K more than the FREE RANGE CHICKEN, would be my rough guess.. :)

Wouldn't surprise me at all if KIWI SPIRIT comes on the market in another year or two... Certainly wouldn't be the first time another of these Ultimate Dream Boats goes from CRUISING WORLD's Cover Story/Yacht Style Features to the brokerage pages after a few seasons...
 

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I thought I was reading post from the first attempt concerning the boat failures. Unbelieveable the second attempt had sail failures. Now reading Stanley's blog it says the rudder was found defective. Also says he may build a smaller boat and design based on leasons learned from first build.
Yeah, downsizing to 56-58 feet will make all the difference to an 80 year old, alright... :)

KIWI SPIRIT may be on the market even sooner than I thought... Which do you suppose is more or less likely: Lyman-Morse getting the build for the next one, or Wouter Verbraak returning as the navigator when TEAM VESTAS WIND rejoins the VOR?

:)
 
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