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I had some excitement this morning when I got up and found several leaks from the first real rainstorm since I got here in January.

Leak one looks like it is coming through a shroud chainplate. Comes through at a pretty good clip. Their was some really sad looking cracked up grey putty around the chainplate on the deck. The surveyor recomended removing them and inspecting them so its possible that I was thinking I would fix it then and not worry about it. In any case I scraped off the sad putty and smeared it with silicone for now. There is rain forecast for the next couple of days so I can't do anything with it right now and will just have to hope the silicone holds up. Until I get them pulled out and let the wood dry and pack it with butyl.

Leak 2 is a window in the main area. My boat has those large non-openable type of windows. I think I found the issue and gave it the same silicone treatment as the chainplate. My issue here is that I am not sure how to go about fixing the window. It looks like it has been taken out once and the plastic did not quite go back together properly. Its kind of wavy and there are gaps(hence the leak I think) where the edges meet. I did some quick googleing for some kind of replacement but did not find much except for portholes. I guess I am wondering if anyone has dealt with replacing those large static windows? it would look kind of funny if I 3 ports on each side but I find I keep the curtains close all the time anyway so its not like the big windows are an asset especially in the sun.

Leak 3 seemed to be coming from the starboard inspection hatch in the cockpit. I took it off and I can see why it was leaking. The screws were barely holding in the fiberglass so even resealing it is only going to last a little while. The cover for it is just a black piece of plexi with 6 screws holding it in. Is there a better solution for this? I can expoxy in the holes and redrill them but it just seems really poorly designed. Especially given that you can get to that space from the berth that is right under it and the headliner has an 8 foot zipper that lets you pretty much crawl right up in there. So its really kind of pointless. It does have the bracket and power connector for the autopilot controller mounted to it which I am still trying to figure out why they did not mount the controller on the pedestal someplace so you don't have to trip over the cord that runs to the motor(st3000 autopilot).

So any suggestions for the windows and inspection window?
 

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I had some excitement this morning when I got up and found several leaks from the first real rainstorm since I got here in January.

Leak one looks like it is coming through a shroud chainplate. Comes through at a pretty good clip. Their was some really sad looking cracked up grey putty around the chainplate on the deck. The surveyor recomended removing them and inspecting them so its possible that I was thinking I would fix it then and not worry about it. In any case I scraped off the sad putty and smeared it with silicone for now. There is rain forecast for the next couple of days so I can't do anything with it right now and will just have to hope the silicone holds up. Until I get them pulled out and let the wood dry and pack it with butyl.

Leak 2 is a window in the main area. My boat has those large non-openable type of windows. I think I found the issue and gave it the same silicone treatment as the chainplate. My issue here is that I am not sure how to go about fixing the window. It looks like it has been taken out once and the plastic did not quite go back together properly. Its kind of wavy and there are gaps(hence the leak I think) where the edges meet. I did some quick googleing for some kind of replacement but did not find much except for portholes. I guess I am wondering if anyone has dealt with replacing those large static windows? it would look kind of funny if I 3 ports on each side but I find I keep the curtains close all the time anyway so its not like the big windows are an asset especially in the sun.

Leak 3 seemed to be coming from the starboard inspection hatch in the cockpit. I took it off and I can see why it was leaking. The screws were barely holding in the fiberglass so even resealing it is only going to last a little while. The cover for it is just a black piece of plexi with 6 screws holding it in. Is there a better solution for this? I can expoxy in the holes and redrill them but it just seems really poorly designed. Especially given that you can get to that space from the berth that is right under it and the headliner has an 8 foot zipper that lets you pretty much crawl right up in there. So its really kind of pointless. It does have the bracket and power connector for the autopilot controller mounted to it which I am still trying to figure out why they did not mount the controller on the pedestal someplace so you don't have to trip over the cord that runs to the motor(st3000 autopilot).

So any suggestions for the windows and inspection window?

You'll have to re-bed the chainplates - it is about a half day job. Make sure that when you remove the shrouds that they are secured to a line led to winch to help assist the mast from not bending to the opposite side (trust me you have to do this).

The window issue you have. Take out the window - trace it out on cardboard or paper and get some Lexan cut from the template you would of created.

Easy stuff... to find someone that sells Lexan in your area - google composites and your area... Most that sell composite material sell lexan...
 

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Telstar 28
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I had some excitement this morning when I got up and found several leaks from the first real rainstorm since I got here in January.

Leak one looks like it is coming through a shroud chainplate. Comes through at a pretty good clip. Their was some really sad looking cracked up grey putty around the chainplate on the deck. The surveyor recomended removing them and inspecting them so its possible that I was thinking I would fix it then and not worry about it. In any case I scraped off the sad putty and smeared it with silicone for now. There is rain forecast for the next couple of days so I can't do anything with it right now and will just have to hope the silicone holds up. Until I get them pulled out and let the wood dry and pack it with butyl.
Bad idea... getting the silicone off the boat will be close to impossible, and it may make it so that other sealants won't stick properly. SILICONE has very little use on a boat.

Leak 2 is a window in the main area. My boat has those large non-openable type of windows. I think I found the issue and gave it the same silicone treatment as the chainplate. My issue here is that I am not sure how to go about fixing the window. It looks like it has been taken out once and the plastic did not quite go back together properly. Its kind of wavy and there are gaps(hence the leak I think) where the edges meet. I did some quick googleing for some kind of replacement but did not find much except for portholes. I guess I am wondering if anyone has dealt with replacing those large static windows? it would look kind of funny if I 3 ports on each side but I find I keep the curtains close all the time anyway so its not like the big windows are an asset especially in the sun.
Replacing them isn't all that difficult. Getting a sheet of plexiglass or lexan and cutting replacements is the hardest part... bedding them is pretty simple and they can often be bedded using butyl tape, which you can get at most glass repair shops. Drill the fastener holes slightly oversized to allow for expansion and contraction, and counter sink the holes to prevent them from becoming a starting point for stress cracks.

Leak 3 seemed to be coming from the starboard inspection hatch in the cockpit. I took it off and I can see why it was leaking. The screws were barely holding in the fiberglass so even resealing it is only going to last a little while. The cover for it is just a black piece of plexi with 6 screws holding it in. Is there a better solution for this? I can expoxy in the holes and redrill them but it just seems really poorly designed. Especially given that you can get to that space from the berth that is right under it and the headliner has an 8 foot zipper that lets you pretty much crawl right up in there. So its really kind of pointless. It does have the bracket and power connector for the autopilot controller mounted to it which I am still trying to figure out why they did not mount the controller on the pedestal someplace so you don't have to trip over the cord that runs to the motor(st3000 autopilot).

So any suggestions for the windows and inspection window?
Why not re-bed the inspection hatch and through bolt it instead of using screws. Through bolting it is far more secure and far stronger. Fiberglass is a lousy material for screws to hold in. It is too brittle and cracks way too easily. Another option is to epoxy t-nuts to the back side of the fiberglass and then use machine screws into the t-nuts. That would allow you to easily remove the cover, since the "nuts" would be permanently affixed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Bad idea... getting the silicone off the boat will be close to impossible, and it may make it so that other sealants won't stick properly. SILICONE has very little use on a boat.
Hrrm. Well too late now. If I have big trouble with it I will remember that lesson next time something is leaking. I tried to keep it pretty contained but I had to do something and I had silicone.

Replacing them isn't all that difficult. Getting a sheet of plexiglass or lexan and cutting replacements is the hardest part... bedding them is pretty simple and they can often be bedded using butyl tape, which you can get at most glass repair shops. Drill the fastener holes slightly oversized to allow for expansion and contraction, and counter sink the holes to prevent them from becoming a starting point for stress cracks.
its not really the plexi or whatever material is in there that is leaking. it is the frame that is around it. The other windows are ok but the plexi has a lot of small cracks that are unsightly but they are sound. The window with the problem has been replaced because it does not have the crazing or the tint that the other windows do. Here are some pics of what I think the problem is:
From the inside. The silicone was already there so someone tried to fix it before. Why they thought putting it on the inside was a good idea I dunno...

On the outside.


Why not re-bed the inspection hatch and through bolt it instead of using screws. Through bolting it is far more secure and far stronger. Fiberglass is a lousy material for screws to hold in. It is too brittle and cracks way too easily. Another option is to epoxy t-nuts to the back side of the fiberglass and then use machine screws into the t-nuts. That would allow you to easily remove the cover, since the "nuts" would be permanently affixed.
Now that is a very sensible idea. As soon as the rain is done I think I will get on that. What should it be sealed with if silicone is off the table? Some kind of rubber gasket? I really don't like the silicone because you can't take the thing off without a lot of work cleaning up the old only to put more on. It was already sealed with silicone so I spent about an hour scraping that off only to find the screws would not really hold it properly. Add that to the lessons learned stack.
 

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Butyl tape is great stuff for sealing and bedding deck hardware. If the port has to open, and the plexiglass is part of the section that has to be removed, then use a neoprene gasket instead, as it is a lot less messy to open and close repeatedly.

As for the ports, I"d like to see a photo of the exterior before commenting. :)
 

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STARBOARD!!
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To me, it looks like someone tried to replace the window inside the plastic frame. Since the other windows are crazed and this one is not; it also seems plausible. So what they did was cut the plastic frame off of the old window; install new lexan and then tried to re-bond the lexan to the old frame with silicone. The gap you see is where they cut the frame be able to remove the lexan.

These windows with a plastic surround are usually made at a factory that injection molds the frame material around the lexan; so that it seals perfectly around the window and there are no seams. It's not just a simple matter of slapping in a new piece of lexan when the plastic crazes.

Your best bet for getting it repaired properly is to buy a new portlight from a company that makes them like Mark Plastics in Corona, CA. (IIRC)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
To me, it looks like someone tried to replace the window inside the plastic frame. Since the other windows are crazed and this one is not; it also seems plausible. So what they did was cut the plastic frame off of the old window; install new lexan and then tried to re-bond the lexan to the old frame with silicone. The gap you see is where they cut the frame be able to remove the lexan.

Your best bet for getting it repaired properly is to buy a new portlight from a company that makes them like Mark Plastics in Corona, CA. (IIRC)
I was thinking that too but there are the same seams on the other windows. On the other windows it looks like they are glued with super glue or something like that. So I would guess that seam broke when they took it apart. Maybe the new plexi was a little bit too big to fit in the frame so they left a gap. the other gaps are really tight so that would be my guess.

I saw the mark a plastics on another site where a guy used them to replace the windows on his islander.
One problem I have with doing that is that I really don't like the windows. :) They don't seem that well made and seemed to be attached in kind of a sloppy way. I guess they have lasted 25 years so they are not too cheaply made but they look it.
 

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Buying windows from Marks Plastics is gonna run you about a 1000.00 bucks for your Islander. I have a great plastics guy here and am going to have him cut new windows for me out of some 1/4 plexiglass. he reccomended that I use Plexi instead of Lexan as it will not scratch as bad. If I remember right you just bought this boat correct? Does it have the vinyl headliner around the windows? If it does while the windows are out look at the plywood behind the headliner and make sure it isnt dry rotted. In my bahama 30 I have taken out the entire headliner and going to put up some teak plywoodalong the main cabin where the windows are and an easily removable headliner to be able to access deck hardware. If you want any pictures of what stuff in your bahama looks like while it is taken apart let me know.

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Buying windows from Marks Plastics is gonna run you about a 1000.00 bucks for your Islander. I have a great plastics guy here and am going to have him cut new windows for me out of some 1/4 plexiglass. he reccomended that I use Plexi instead of Lexan as it will not scratch as bad. If I remember right you just bought this boat correct? Does it have the vinyl headliner around the windows? If it does while the windows are out look at the plywood behind the headliner and make sure it isnt dry rotted. In my bahama 30 I have taken out the entire headliner and going to put up some teak plywoodalong the main cabin where the windows are and an easily removable headliner to be able to access deck hardware. If you want any pictures of what stuff in your bahama looks like while it is taken apart let me know.
Jeff
Yep just got the boat and this is the first real rain so that is why I am just finding it. Luckily I did not go with my initial plan and replace the cushions right away that would have seriously annoyed me.

Yep mine has the vinyl all over the place. A lot of the staples have been removed as they have rusted and stained the vinyl where they were. I like the headliner in certain places but it is a pretty bad covering in other spots. I have been trying to come up with a way to clean it up and make it look better but am not having much luck coming up with anything better. If you have any ideas I would gladly listen. :) I have been thinking of putting shelving under the window there but every time I start thinking about it the project snowballs and I get cold feet. My mom is pretty handy with ugly problems I will have to see if she has any ideas.

Pictures of what to expect are always welcome. I have been trying to take lots of pictures of things when I have them apart for future reference and in case anyone else wants to know. I just got a video of what it looks like when you take the knotmeter plug out to replace the paddlewheel on it. That was pretty exciting. Sadly I was not paying attention to which way it came out so now I think it is not quite straight so I have to figure out which way its supposed to go.

I was figuring windows would be around $300 each for the plastic ones. I think the post I saw was from 06 and he said he paid $260 or so. I don't want to spend the money on it but it just seems silly to me to try and fix that one window as its already been messed with for some reason. So I could get it apart and find it won't go back together any better than it already is. I can't imagine having new windows in your boat is one of the most satisfying things to get. But having them leak is pretty uspetting. :) Replacing both the starboard ones would at least keep the appearance the same and save me a bit short term.
 

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The head liner I am building will be a couple of removable panels in the main overhaed. I will build the same style to cover the underside of the deck by the settees. I should be starting on it here in the next few weeks after I replace the bulkheads I have taken out. The PO used different colored stains or teak oil in the cabin so I am stripping everything and going to varnish with an epifannes satin.
Along the hull I have seen some bahama 30s with teak slats that looked really nice. Shouldn't be to hard to clean paint install carpet then the slats over the carpet.
The windows I am going to install wont have that dumb molding ring. When my plastic guy cuts my new windows I am going to have him cut them an inch bigger all the way around. This is going to make rebedding way easier down the road like SD suggested. The countersunk machine screws will be every couple inches and should give the boat a more modern look. When I talked to Mark at Marks Plastics he quoted me around 225 per window a couple months ago.

Jeff
 

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I would recommend replacing the overhead with panels attached to furring strips that are epoxied to the hull.
 

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Tough to tell from the pictures what the set up is...but in the 'for what it's worth' category. When I replaced the portlights in my 72 NorthStar, I bedded the 1/2" plexiglass in the cutout hole that it sits in without the frame. I made sure with 3m 4200, that they were solid and water tight without any assistance of the 2-piece frame that trimmed and held them in place. Then I set the frames in place with 3m 4000 - more for cosmetic purposes that strength. This gave me the confidence that messing with bedding around the frame fasteners would have minimal effect on the strength and water-tightness of the plexiglass.

Sorry to blab if you don't have a similar set up.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The head liner I am building will be a couple of removable panels in the main overhaed. I will build the same style to cover the underside of the deck by the settees. I should be starting on it here in the next few weeks after I replace the bulkheads I have taken out. The PO used different colored stains or teak oil in the cabin so I am stripping everything and going to varnish with an epifannes satin.
Along the hull I have seen some bahama 30s with teak slats that looked really nice. Shouldn't be to hard to clean paint install carpet then the slats over the carpet.
Carpet? Is that to keep it from stressing? Or is that another word for the padding/insulation in there. I was thinking of some kind of slats as well but the angle and the curves seems like it would be beyond my skills. It would really look good after it was done though.

The windows I am going to install wont have that dumb molding ring. When my plastic guy cuts my new windows I am going to have him cut them an inch bigger all the way around. This is going to make rebedding way easier down the road like SD suggested. The countersunk machine screws will be every couple inches and should give the boat a more modern look. When I talked to Mark at Marks Plastics he quoted me around 225 per window a couple months ago.
An inch bigger? Are you getting a different type of window or are you going to cut the hole bigger? I was considering glassing in the holes and cutting new ones for the oval style ports but it would change the look of the boat too much I think to be any usable idea and would cost just as much since you need more of the smaller windows.
 

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You'll have to re-bed the chainplates - it is about a half day job. Make sure that when you remove the shrouds that they are secured to a line led to winch to help assist the mast from not bending to the opposite side (trust me you have to do this).
..
Are you talking about rebedding the chain plates with the mast still up. i have been wanting to try and do this but am not sure if the halyards will hold the mast steady for the 5 or 6 hours it would need to. What if i did one side at a time? Any comments or suggestions folks
 

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A tensioned halyard attached to the rail should be fine. The loads that hold the mast vertical are minimal; it's when the boat heels while sailing that the shrouds are under strain. Just do your work on a day when it's not blowing 30 kts in the marina and you will be OK. Do one chainplate at a time; don't pull all of them and expect the mast to remain properly tuned (or up).
 

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I was thinking that too but there are the same seams on the other windows.
My boat has the same type of portlight; what appears to be a seam is an edge that is formed where the seam is located on the mold; not a glue joint. I'll take another look at mine; but I'm pretty sure that there is no glue between the frame and the lexan window.

Lexan is about 4x stronger than plexi; so for safety you should use UV stableized lexan for replacement. In addition since the plastic frame design is somewhat weak; storm shutters attached outside of the windows would also be a good idea if you are taking the boat cruising.
 

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A tensioned halyard attached to the rail should be fine. The loads that hold the mast vertical are minimal; it's when the boat heels while sailing that the shrouds are under strain. Just do your work on a day when it's not blowing 30 kts in the marina and you will be OK. Do one chainplate at a time; don't pull all of them and expect the mast to remain properly tuned (or up).
i have been looking at this on my boat and I am not too worried about it assuming I can get a calm day without powerboaters creating big wakes I don't think I will have too much trouble with the shrouds. On my boat the chainplates are attached on either side of the bulkhead with the same bolts so I can't really do one at a time. I am going to try and figure something out with 2 winches but baring that I am thinking the shroud that goes to the masthead is the more important one so will make sure that one is well secured. Is that reasoning correct?

As to the offending window I think I will take it apart and see if I can reseal it as is and then start planning the larger project of replacing the windows and the headliner. I kind of wanted to start the headliner in the V as that is in worse shape but I guess you have to make lemonade when you get the chance...
 

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Carpet? Is that to keep it from stressing? Or is that another word for the padding/insulation in there. I was thinking of some kind of slats as well but the angle and the curves seems like it would be beyond my skills. It would really look good after it was done though.

The carpet will be a tan in color with closed cell foam behind it for insulation. The tan color is to help make the interior feel warmer and lighter. Using teak slats that are about 1/8 in thick will bend to the contour of the hull. Then I just need to mark the slats right so that the butt nicely at the ends.

An inch bigger? Are you getting a different type of window or are you going to cut the hole bigger? I was considering glassing in the holes and cutting new ones for the oval style ports but it would change the look of the boat too much I think to be any usable idea and would cost just as much since you need more of the smaller windows.
With the windows being an inch bigger all the way around it will make it so that my holes in the windows aren't right be the edge and give me a little more surface area to put my sealant to ensure a good seal between the window and the cabin. When the sealant cures I will carefully go around the windows with a utility knife cut the excess off. Then I will lay a bead of sealant all the way around the edge of the windows to give it a little more water tightness and prevent my clumsy a$$ from gettin something caught in the window edge and causing damage.

Hope this helps. I sent you a PM about removing your windows.

Jeff
 

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OP, here is another option for your leaking windows. I am probably going to try this, or something very similar, in the coming few weeks. My port window leaks like a sieve. I guess thats what the guy who sold me the boat meant when he told me there were no leaks at all. To be fair, i never asked if there were any waterfalls! :eek:

Anyhow, this looks like an interesting project:

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance-articles/33774-surface-mounted-ports.html
 
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