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RL24 (Rob Legg) Kookaburra
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I have seen pictures of boats that have AC and/or electric ranges. Just curious if this is run off many batteries and solar power, or is it pretty simple to get power off your engine,be it an inboard/outboard or just an outboard? I didn't see any generators unless they were tucked away.
 

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These boats you are talking about...were they actually running these devices while away from the dock?
If they were, and you didn't see any generator, chances are close to 100%, they had an installed marine genset. You would need an awful lot of battery power to run anything but a very small AC unit and especially a power hungry electric stove.

I've got a 16,000 BTU AC unit on my boat. Only runs when I'm at the dock.
 

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RL24 (Rob Legg) Kookaburra
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That makes sense. Yeah it was just pics of modifications people had done and they were selling the boat so I didn't see them as they were underway. Logical though that it would just be used when they are in a marina.
 

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One of the most inane things that boat builders do is install electric stoves.. since the inverter/battery use for such a thing is impractical it means a generator is the only way to make it work.

When you get around to spending weekends on the hook you'll know which boats have electric stoves when you hear the generators fire up at dinner time... and breakfast time.... and coffee time....
 

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Yes, a camping stove will work fine on a small boat. Just don't store propane in the cabin, as it is an explosion hazard. On my 22 footer I do most of my cooking in the cockpit, which is where I keep a couple of the little camping propane bottles.
 

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There are different options. Some do use small camping stoves, but mostly, people use rail mounted marine grills. most are connected to small propane canisters. My boat has an installed marine oven with cooktop. While mine runs on CNG gas, most are connected to propane tanks, either mounted outboard or in dedicated, sealed propane lockers.
 

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Don't call me a "senior"!
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Get an unpressurized alcohol stove. Much safer than propane, and cheaper to properly install. No remote tank, no dedicated locker, no tubing, no solenoid, no sniffer needed, and no ka-BOOM if any of the aforementioned components fail.
 

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One of the most inane things that boat builders do is install electric stoves.. since the inverter/battery use for such a thing is impractical it means a generator is the only way to make it work.

When you get around to spending weekends on the hook you'll know which boats have electric stoves when you hear the generators fire up at dinner time... and breakfast time.... and coffee time....
I disagree with you regarding electric galleys. I didn't want explosive gas inside my cabin, so I installed an electric galley; both oven and hobs. I don't need to run the generator to cook. The inverter and 1000Ah battery bank are up to the task just fine. And when I'm on the boat I don't go to a dock more than once or twice every 6 months, I'm a liveaboard and not a weekend sailor so the energy balance has to work - and it does.

 

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I disagree with you regarding electric galleys. I didn't want explosive gas inside my cabin, so I installed an electric galley; both oven and hobs. I don't need to run the generator to cook. The inverter and 1000Ah battery bank are up to the task just fine. And when I'm on the boat I don't go to a dock more than once or twice every 6 months, I'm a liveaboard and not a weekend sailor so the energy balance has to work - and it does.

The OP apparently has a 24-ft boat. Not very likely that he'll have a 1000Ah battery bank or a genset.
 

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Glad it works for you, Zanshin, and kudos for being able to get by without a genset to make a pot of coffee.. but I'd submit that you're among the minority of those who use electrics and don't need to run the gen. Plus you're a sailor and probably more sensitive in that area - and 1000aH capacity is more than most choose to buy or even have space for.

Certainly here we get forced to listen to and smell generators everywhere as described - but admittedly mostly power vessels.

I think the biggest issue with propane is awareness, good equipment and common sense practice.
 
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There really is no one right answer. Pretty much every option has some advantages and some drawbacks. On large boats with substantial battery banks an induction cook top can be a great addition since it allows you to get rid of an explosive fuel source. And they don't heat up the interior as much. On a smaller boat they doesn't have the battery capacity they don't work since you have to be at the dock or run a generator to operate them.

Propane or gas works great but there is limited storage capability on small boats. And requires carrying an explosive fuel source that can and has blown up boats.

Alcohol stoves work fine but put out a lot of humidity and go thru fuel quickly...

As with most things on boats there is no one right answer.
 

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I actually partialy dismantled the on board three burner propane stove and oven that came with my boat. For two years I have been using a wide base single Coleman burner that works very well for cooking on the stove cooktop:
THE BIANKA LOG BLOG: RETHINKING PROPANE ON BOARD: PLAN A
Heats water fast, very stable and is portable enough to bring into the cockpit if one does not want to heat up the cabin in summer. Been using it for two seasons. As far as cooking with electricity I did spurge this year and bought a small bread maker that I operate off of a sine wave inverter. I make fresh bread every couple of days. It takes about 2% of my battery ( 48 volt) capacity that is easily recharged by my solar panels and wind turbine. Have not had to fire up the generator in three weeks. Also makes Pizza dough that I then cook on a cast iron skillet on Coleman burner. Mmmmm!:)
 

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I have seen pictures of boats that have AC and/or electric ranges. Just curious if this is run off many batteries and solar power, or is it pretty simple to get power off your engine,be it an inboard/outboard or just an outboard? I didn't see any generators unless they were tucked away.
With some exceptions, such as Zanshin, most boats with electric cooking run a generator every time they use the cooker. A/C has even fewer exceptions to the "must run generator" mantra.

Okay, sounds good. Do you guys use something like a camping stove then?
Marine propane cookers work pretty much like gas cookers at home.

Get an unpressurized alcohol stove. Much safer than propane, and cheaper to properly install. No remote tank, no dedicated locker, no tubing, no solenoid, no sniffer needed, and no ka-BOOM if any of the aforementioned components fail.
There really is no one right answer. Pretty much every option has some advantages and some drawbacks.
Exactly.

Resistive electric cooking is a huge consumer of power.

Induction electric cooking has about half the power requirement.

Both require a significant power source - some combination of huge battery bank, generator, and/or really substantial alternative (solar/wind) power generation.

Propane is fast and hot (like induction cooking), easily adjusted, and so common that service and parts are readily available. Propane is one of the most common (perhaps the most common) cooking fuel in the world. You can get propane anywhere. The system requires maintenance to be safe. Propane is explosive and heavier than air so proper installation and operation is necessary to use safely.

Alcohol stoves use a non-explosive fuel source. I'm not aware of any equipment that is gymballed. The heat output is half of propane. The flames are transparent which has led to burns and fires.
 

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If I were going to put an electric stove aboard, I think I would use induction. The type that use magentic tech and stay cool to touch, but you must use steel pots and pans. An normal electric stove top will stay hot enough for some time to burn yourself or burn something that may fall on it. That's seems undesirable in a rolling galley. Both fuel based and induction are essentially off when they're off.
 

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I've used both alcohol (with pressurized and non-pressurized stoves) and propane on the boats I've owned. Lots of bad information on both in this thread. Alcohol is an excellent fuel for boats, especially small ones if you use an non-pressurized stove like an Origo. The burner heat output is about the same as a propane and the fuel is readily available in most hardware stores. And no, the burner flame is not invisible. Propane is safe as long as you have a proper and maintained installation with a vented locker for the cylinder, solenoid shutoff valve, etc. I am comfortable using either on a boat. You just have to follow the necessary precautions.
 

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Jim, we've used both alcohol and propane over the years and I agree both are viable fuels each with their own issues and practices.. but in our experience the heat output is noticeably less with alcohol - according to the specs nearly half.

From another online source:

Ethanol, also known as ethyl alcohol, contains approximately 12,500 BTU of heat per pound.
Methanol, or methyl alcohol, contains just over 10,000 BTU of heat per pound.

White gas contains approximately 20,000 BTU per pound, or nearly double the amount of denatured alcohol.

Propane contains approximately 21,500 BTU per pound, more heat than any other campstove fuel for its weight.
Butane is a close second, with just over 21,000 BTU per pound.
 

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Propane is safe as long as you have a proper and maintained installation with a vented locker for the cylinder, solenoid shutoff valve, etc. I am comfortable using either on a boat. You just have to follow the necessary precautions.
Or you can use CNG. It can be hard to find, but no need to have a dedicated, vented locker for the tank. A leak in the line doesn't have the potential disaster waiting to happen as propane would have.
 
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