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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The term one ship stupid refers to a person learning something wrong and teaching it to another never knowing the fault. With all the outlets for sailors these day I'm seeing quite a few interesting, amusing and often frightening results. Its winter and I thought this would be a fun topic to mull over the short days and cold nights. This thread I'm sure will be both amusing and informative.

Ok I'll start, I was walking through the Marina today and couldn't find a single sailboat with its jib lead cars on the proper way, they were all backwards. I guess even big boat manufacturers are suffering from one ship stupid these days. The locking piston should be on the front of the car not behind it. There are many reasons for this including ease of use and safety, not one boat in the whole harbor had them on right. Well I guess I didnt look at every boat but I spent a good hour walking the docks. Have fun kids :)
 

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At the risk of appearing stupid, can you explain why jib lead cars should be mounted with the pins forward? Is it because if they're mounted with the pins aft, the sheet leads over the pin as it goes back to the winch, making it difficult to access and perhaps impossible to release with the jib sheeted in? Are there other reasons? Simply stating that it should be one way and not another doesn't raise the cognitive level of the situation or involve much teaching.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You are right on the first part, also when adjusting under load the car is forced back and can do quite a bit of damage to your hand if car is backwards. Also thats just the design of it :)
BTW I appear stupid on a daily basis, not a bad thing or so they tell me.
 

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You are right on the first part, also when adjusting under load the car is forced back and can do quite a bit of damage to your hand if car is backwards. Also thats just the design of it :)
BTW I appear stupid on a daily basis, not a bad thing or so they tell me.
Maybe on a little boat like yours it can be adjusted under load, but you certainly aren't going to be able to do that on a bigger boat. I don't care which side the pin is on, if we came into the wind to adjust the block underway on the loaded side, you'd be risking more than a finger or hand from a flogging sheet. We always adjust the windward (unloaded) block and then tack.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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By the looks of most cleat hitches on the dock, this must be the way they got started. Just do as many figure eights as you can, until you run out of dock line, then do a hitch. Or just do 42 hitches. Or, if you're drunk, do a few hitches, then a dozen figure eights, followed by a few more hitches.
Tying a cleat hitch seems to be a big mystery to many. Walking down any dock, very few of these are tied correctly. It is not really intuitive to do it correctly so a bit of thought is involved. Cleat Hitch | How to tie the Cleat Hitch for a Halyard | Boating Knots

Maybe it's not a case of learning it wrong but more a case of not learning it at all. Sloppy knot tying is a candidate in many forms for this discussion. How many half hitches and granny knots have you seen in place of the correct knot:)?
 

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Tying a cleat hitch seems to be a big mystery to many..
Two rivers and a bridge. Look at a properly tied cleat hitch and it's two rivers and a bridge.

There was a thread here once, where people took pics of the grossest examples they could find. They were funny.

I buddy of mine calls the spastic over, under, around, hitched to death knot, the hatchet knot. Takes a hatchet to get it off.
 

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hmmmmmmmmmmmmm

I saw an amusing vid not too long ago on how to adjust jib cars under sail or load on a bigger boat...and I thought to myself why not just tack over adjust then go back

I mean is your sail going to die in one tack?

well basically this video showed a 2 man person job with a second "sheet" going down to a second winch that pulled in on the jib after the original sheetwas let slack...by slack the damn sail was out like a chute on a knockdown...

ok so the adjuster does this routine a few times and is yelling back at the helmsman who is in control of the electric winch who kind of had things in control

it took Im going to say a solid 3 minutes of work to adjust the now unloaded car...

now I dont know how slow some of us tack or if big boats dont like to but I just thought that this is one of those ship stupid cases with a caveat...it does work I just dont see why you would need to do this...

now racing you adjust stuff like this all the time

on small boats I have always stepped on the jib sheet...and moved the car as needed...no difference wether the lock was in front or back...however for ease of use most had the lock back

just sayin

some things indistry wise are supposed to be done a certain way, however that doesnt mean that doing it another way is ship stupid...maybe just DIFFERENT

I for one dont mind what direction a car lock is however I fully understand the way its supposed to be...

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaanywhoooo
 

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My 1,000 sq ft genoa can have the cars moved by one person, either forwards or backwards, under load, by using 4ft of 3/8 line, a rolling hitch and a round turn and 2 half hitches!

Just a matter of knowing where to tie the line for each adjustment!

And the cars are not on a pulley system.

Phil
 

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I'm confused as to why the OP is so certain that his methods are the most correct methods and that everyone else is "one ship stupid".

Since I've started sailing, I've learned that sailboats are as unique and as dynamic as human beings themselves. What is "wrong" on one sailboat, works very well on another sailboat.

I'm not about to start pointing fingers at people except perhaps in the grossest cases of poor seamanship.
 

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Swab
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Re: One Ship Stupid on a square rigger

My first long ocean passage was three weeks in an Australian wooden square rigger. Woe to the crew member who threw a "Yachtie hitch" on a cleat. "A clockwise round turn and three figure of eights" was the elegant standard.

While sail handling at night you had to know that every line was belayed properly in the same manner. No lights allowed on deck and no time to look and figure it out. To this day the only time I throw a hitch on a cleat is if the cleat is too small for three figure eights.
 

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Re: One Ship Stupid on a square rigger

I'm confused as to why the OP is so certain that his methods are the most correct methods and that everyone else is "one ship stupid".

Since I've started sailing, I've learned that sailboats are as unique and as dynamic as human beings themselves. What is "wrong" on one sailboat, works very well on another sailboat.

I'm not about to start pointing fingers at people except perhaps in the grossest cases of poor seamanship.
don't you know there is only one way of doing things, and if you spend more than $500 a month to live you are wasteful.

My first long ocean passage was three weeks in an Australian wooden square rigger. Woe to the crew member who threw a "Yachtie hitch" on a cleat. "A clockwise round turn and three figure of eights" was the elegant standard.

While sail handling at night you had to know that every line was belayed properly in the same manner. No lights allowed on deck and no time to look and figure it out. To this day the only time I throw a hitch on a cleat is if the cleat is too small for three figure eights.
To me that is key, consistency. More important is that things are done in a consistent manor, as long as it is safe. There are some things that are learned "wrong," but if they are safe don't stress yourself about others actions. Most of the time I have seen really bad hitches on the dock it is done by a guest. Though I will have to say power boaters seem to take less care with there knots, likely because they don't have to tie as many.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Re: One Ship Stupid on a square rigger

don't you know there is only one way of doing things, and if you spend more than $500 a month to live you are wasteful.

I'm sure you are smarter than the designers at Harken but I'm not. Looks like a little passive aggression going on with the $500 comment. I'd suggest you take a deep breath, lighten up and have a bit of fun, life is too short. :)
 

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I'm not about to start pointing fingers at people except perhaps in the grossest cases of poor seamanship.
I would tend to agree. However, everyone has a different continuum of what poor seamanship is. There are often trade-offs to doing things one way or another. Often the observer is not aware of the trade-offs that have been made in the sailors head because of their own priorities.
 
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