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This is a real big Ooops! I would expect that there a career or two ending over this mistake!

Navy ship runs aground off Honolulu - Military- msnbc.com


And apparently, they were unable to get it off today, even lightened and with more tugs.
Quite possibly. They were on sea-trials so it's not at all unlikely that there was a system failure of some sort and not a navigational error that caused the grounding. In some cases the Navy has used merchant mariners to take their ships out on sea trials after yard periods, particularly where the cause for the yard visit was a critical system like the steering gear or such. They use a smaller but much more experienced crew so as to have more trained manpower available when something unpleasant occurs. Couple of acquaintances of mine took the Belnap out on trials after her yard stay to repair the damage caused by the John F. Kennedy cutting her in two.
 

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The Captain and the Nav are done, and the Nav LPO is probably cooked too, though possibly not quite as obviously as the other two.

The Navy has a really dim view of officers who ground their ships. Look at the record of what happened with the USS San Fransisco in 2005, they hit something that wasn't even on the charts and they canned the CO, the NAV and and the LPO I think. (I've also read the stories of the navigations dept saying that they don't have time to update all of the charts with all of the thousands of items in the "notice to mariners", as a former nuke I have zero pitty for them)
 

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That's the last time they use one of Cam's GPSes.

While I feel for those guys...does the Navy no longer have lookouts? Even in the crappy picture, the contrasting water colour of the reef is easily seen.
 

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“Clearly, the ship is not where the ship should have been."

Duhhhhhhh, I guess you could say that!

"The investigation will determine exactly why the ship got to the point where she was in shoal water"

I guess it will, but I can tell you the answer now: Somebody f***ed up! It's as simple as that.

I kinda feel for the CO. Twenty years of doing everything right to get where he got and then some stupid JO OD messes him up. But, that's the way it works, and in the end, it probably works better that way. When you let little things happen, what happens to the big things?

Society grants few people as much power as that possessed by a captain of a ship at sea. With ultimate authority comes ultimate responsibility! We should all keep that in mind the next time we leave the dock.
 

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XTR,
What navigator? Last I knew, navigation was still a collateral duty for officers on USN surface ships! And a hearty "Hear, Hear!" to your point on the NtM. There's only one chart on board at any given time that must be up to date; the one you're using. Anyone who insists on updating the entire portfolio is either a pencil-pushing bureaucrat or a moron. Especially where the ship operates as the Navy does their's.

You correct the charts for the proposed voyage to San Francisco and then, when orders change, you correct the charts for Puget Sound. If you never get orders for Puget Sound you haven't wasted a bunch of time updating a chart for which a new edition will likely come out before you ever go there.

It's hard to believe that you can have an entire sonar department as well, yet no one is tasked with "job one" with monitoring water under the keel!

Unfortunately for the Navy they periodically have these incidents when the mission of the moment seems to eclipse the practice of good seamanship. It's an organizational thing, that makes things like navigation a collateral duty. From personal experience it would come as no surprise to me if a friendly call on the VHF saying, "Hey, Capt., 'yer runnin' outta water over there" wouldn't be heard either. Monitoring the VHF is for mere mortals too. The kind who have the bridge fathometer running.
 

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Apparently there ARE a couple of known bumps in the area, sounds like someone got distracted and unless they can prove their systems were jammed by Al-Queda agents operating out of the airport...

"Lucy, you got a lot a 'splainin' to do!"

I'd have posted a chart snippet, but the upload manager simply says "failed" with no indication why. The file size/type are within bounds, must be the same gremlins that boarded that ship.
 

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Notice to Mariners: Big freaking U.S. Navy ship is currently marking out the hazard to shipping known as Bozo Reef...Avoid area...but you knew that, right?

I'm sorry, guys. This is right up there with Sir Cloudesley Shovell (great name, eh?) and what happened to his squadron in 1707: HMS Association - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The only positive of that disaster is that it prompted a push by British science and the Royal Navy to develop a better method of determining longitude, which led to the lunar method and Harrison's chronometer, which changed cartography utterly.

What this incident will tell us...aside from the fact that they had technological advances that would have seemed like witchcraft to Admiral Shovell, and still managed to hit a clearly visible reef...remains to be seen.

Oh, wait...Shovell might have recognized binoculars as a sort of double telescope...but wondered why the hand up in the crow's nest didn't shout out "thin water ahead! Breakers!".

Sorry if this seems harsh, but I've been thinking about it all night on and off, and I'm getting pissed off. How is this different from landing a perfectly functioning jumbo jet on a neighbourhood eight miles from an airport?

And lest anyone think this is an anti-U.S. rant (yeah, it's definitely a rant), Canada has nautical morons worthy of deep-sixing as well:

MV Queen of the North - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bah. No excuses.
 

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To all you captains out there, just remember that 100 "attaboys" gets wiped out by 1 "Oh sh*t!"

And you know that was the captain's first thought when his ship came to a sudden stop.
 

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To all you captains out there, just remember that 100 "attaboys" gets wiped out by 1 "Oh sh*t!"

And you know that was the captain's first thought when his ship came to a sudden stop.
And here all along I thought it was "10,000 attaboys":eek:
 

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None of you have any idea of what happened out there so this is all speculative bullsh*t by a bunch of armchair skippers. :rolleyes:

Bridge crew is done............
Sad part is there might be some good men there.
"Some" good men? I'd say they were all good men (and women), serving their country in uniform.
 

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Sailaway21,

Where are you getting your information about merchant captains on navy ships and navigator being collateral duty. It's been a long time since I was in the Navy, but my son was doing his two weeks training just this week (he's a reserve officer), and he made reference to the navigator in some of our discussions.

The captain's career is indeed over, no matter what the conditions. Probably a couple of the officers (navigator, officer of the deck) will have also reached the end.

Whenever, we entered a harbor (and I believe it's the same now), a pilot familiar with that harboar came aboard. And there's a treacherous relationship here...the captain has to follow the pilot's recommendations, otherwise if there is an incident, the captain is finished. And if he follows the pilot's recommendations and an incident occurs, he is finished.

Navigator is an official assignment, just like engineering officer, executive officer, and captain. Officers on ships that are in line for all of those jobs are called Naval Warfare Officers with a designator of 1100 (some few exceptions).

Where did you get the information about not keeping charts up to date...there is a navigation department that does that. Also, when we did it, we used fire control radar to get bearing and distance ranges to known objects, sonar may or not being on with all the whale protection rules now, surface radar would have been on, and GPS would have been in effect. All that said, if you have been on a large ship, you know that they have limited maneurverability and the channels are narrow...apply a change in rudder setting a little too early or a little to late and you're in deep trouble.

As to merchant captains in charge of commissioned Navy ships, it did not happen when I was in and I don't think it happens today, but I can't say for sure....if so it's not like the Navy I knew.

The circumstances of this event will be cleared up by the investigation. A steering failure could cause such an event. Channels are relatively narrow and shoaling, reefs can rise rather quickly. Time will tell.

But don't just trash the Navy unless you really know for sure....just my two cents worth and not trying to start a fight.
 

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I don't know how things are done nowadays, since I have been retired for some time, but when I was a Navigator on a destroyer it was not a collateral duty. I had a lot of other jobs at the same time, and they were all collateral. Unfortunately, bad things happen to good people, and the good people in the Navy know that. I don't see how this could be an instance of non human error - hitting something not on the chart. That won't sail. Good people screwed up, and they are going to have to pay for it. CO, XO, Nav are certainly toast, and that's as it should be. You have to demand the best to be the best.
 

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There are no mechant captains controlling US Navy ships. The pilots used are Navy/Naval pilots.
Now a Navy Officer coming from a Maritime Academy, who has activated his Navy Reserve statist could increase his Merchant Mariner's License while serving in the Navy. But it would have no role in the job assignments of his Navy career.
Granted someone dropped the ball here and has brought down a couple of more Officers with him/her. But in my Navy experience I have found that some people get tunnel vision about the job at hand and lose the big picture. And this may be what happened. Someone forgot that when the ship is not connected to shore or anchored, it is in the providence of the elements. And the elements of the weather and sea currents can be sneaky little Bastards.
 

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While we are sitting in our ARMCHAIRS we might as well have a beer or two.:cool:
After didn't the Captain of the Exon Valdez have a drop or two after his third mate ran his ship aground?:rolleyes:
 
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