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The charts have always been an issue for me. My cruising ground is the Mediterranean. I have a subscription for Navionics charts for the Med (which I use on my B&G chart plotter via an SD card. Am I right in thinking that these won't work on OpenCPN?

If so does anyone know of charts that would work on OpenCPN for the Med that don't cost a fortune.

I do like the idea of planning routes on my PC rather than at the chart plotter which is outside.

Sent from my LYA-L09 using Tapatalk
We use CM93 charts - love the planning use but also they are great when the CP does not work. When we came into Herzliya we found out Navionics chip for the Med did not include Israel or Egypt - we just fired up our tablet and the Bluetooth gps and had great charts -
 
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As for planning -
1st - we have OpenCPN on the computers and use RayMarine Navionics for actually sailing at the helm.

2nd - we plan our trips using OpenCPN and get a lat/lon for our destination and then go to our CP and check and put it in. We do not put in intermediate waypoints - we work those out as we go along when we have to make course changes -

3rd - we never add weather until I do my forecast and decide when we will leave - We do all planning on 5k and all of us know we can do better than that but we use 5kt and plan on daylight entrances.

4th - we rarely enter the same port or harbor more than once -(unless wintering as we are now and doing day sails) so we want to see - to us entering an unknow port/harbor in the dark with charts that may or may not be accurate is not at the top of our to do list.

5th - right now we are planning a long summer sail across and up and around the northern Med - but first we got to get our of Egypt to someplace and using OpenCPN we can look at nm angles on the prevailing winds and anchorages for a rest and good protection from prevailing winds - if things go well and the winds cooperate we will do a 4-5 day sail and if not a 3 day sail and then day jumps to get to where we want to really start our summer - as well as where we will check into Schengen (that is a longer discussion)

6th we have used track on occasion - going into and out of some ports we do a track in so we can follow our route out as it may be shallow or confusing or not marked - example going into the Rio Dulce we laid a track as we followed another boat in but we were the lead boat on the way out and simply followed our track -

7th all options are open once underway - example - if we leave on a wx window that says we got what looks like a great window for a 5 day sail and once underway (we check the wx 2x a day when underway on long sails) if the wx changes we deviate from the plan and will change course for the shorter sail and get tucked in before the potential blow hits.
 
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A5th - right now we are planning a long summer sail across and up and around the northern Med - but first we got to get our of Egypt to someplace and using OpenCPN we can look at nm angles on the prevailing winds and anchorages for a rest and good protection from prevailing winds - if things go well and the winds cooperate we will do a 4-5 day sail and if not a 3 day sail and then day jumps to get to where we want to really start our summer - as well as where we will check into Schengen (that is a longer discussion)

You might want to start a new thread on that as some here have experience in that area.
Here is the right forum --> https://www.sailnet.com/forums/iberia-med/
 

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What model MFD do you have that supports Navionics and Bluetooth? .....
Our recent bareboat had a Raymarine Axiom Pro. I was blown away by it. Keep in mind, my perspective is on some really old stuff, but I've been exposed to just about every generation for the last 20 years. This was amazing. Easy to customize everything on one screen, charts, routes, true and apparent wind, SOG and STW speeds, even the autopilot controls.

I'm not sure if it supports bluetooth or wifi, but I know it could connect to a tablet as well. We didn't do that.
 

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OpenCPN is a geek's dream, with infinite possibilities for integration of navigational data. The power (and complexity) may get even greater with the upcoming version 5, for better or worse. But you do not need all that complexity, as it can function very nicely as an ordinary chartplotter.

There are two unescapable aspects of using OpenCPN that may make it a little more difficult to set up than a turnkey chartplotter:


  1. OpenCPN does not come with charts out-of-the-box. You need to bring your own charts. For those in the US, free charts are available and easily downloaded, especially with the downloader plugin. So the first time you use OpenCPN you may need to select the folder where the charts are located. This is not hard to do, and it puzzles me that it intimidates some people so much. Once you have them, they are always available even if you're out of Wifi range. One benefit of this approach is that you can put the charts anywhere, including on an SD card so you can take them home for updating (where you likely have faster Internet) and/or move the SD card between different computers to have them readily accessible. You could also sync them to the cloud, though they may take up a lot of space that requires paying for upgraded capacity. That's why I keep them on SD cards.

  2. OpenCPN may need to be interfaced with a GPS dongle. This is true for any navigation program. Most laptops do not have internal GPS. Virtually all smartphones do, so if you buy a smartphone app you don't need to worry about this. But we all know that there are many iPad owners who are shocked to learn that their Wifi iPad model does not have an internal GPS, so even Apple devices are not always that simple. I run OpenCPN on three inexpensive Windows tablets, two of which have GPS built-in. On my own boat I don't actually need the built-in GPS because I have a GPS antenna that feeds my DSC radio that also broadcasts over Bluetooth and Wifi, which OpenCPN easily picks up. But the internal GPS is very handy when I take my tablet onto charter boats or friends' boats.

Maybe these two issues are too intimidating for some. But personally, I find the user interface of OpenCPN to be extremely intuitive, and the first-time setup of charts and GPS is a distant memory that I quickly moved past. I really like having the exact same program running on my big screen at home (for planning future routes) and on my little tablets on the boat, where I automatically synchronize the routes, waypoints, and tracks using Google Backup and Sync whenever I'm in Wifi range.

I think that OpenCPN has a lot going for it, but I'm fine if some prefer to use a smartphone app, fixed mount chartplotter, or handheld GPS. I have those too, but OpenCPN on a Windows tablet (with no moving parts) has become my default navigation tool with all the others playing backup.
Hey there,

Im working to get my pi set up. I have opencpn/plotter installed and running fine. I followed a tutorial to set up realVNC to remotely access my navigation system on a tablet in the cockpit. I'm connected to the pi on my tablet via the pi's internal wifi, but now I can't connect my pi to the internet via my wifi Hotspot. I bought a plug in wifi stick, but I'm nervous to set it up for fear of messing with the code I input for the realVNC wifi connection.

Do you perhaps have any insight on how to set up a secondary plug in wifi connection to access the internet?

Thank you for reading,
-Billy
 

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[...]
Do you perhaps have any insight on how to set up a secondary plug in wifi connection to access the internet?
I guess I'd ask first if your hotspot provides an access point, and if you intend to leave it on all the time? If you do plan to leave it on all the time and it provides an access point, I would probably connect the pi and your tablet to the hotspot, and only deal with one wifi setup. If the hotspot AP won't be on all the time, then you'll probably need to go down your current plan of configuring a second wifi adapter.

When you plug in the second wifi adapter, it will appear as another ethernet adapter on the system. I don't know which tutorial you followed to have the pi host an AP for your tablet, so I can't speak with authority on how to avoid breaking that link. What I can tell you is that it is pretty easy to set up an additional network adapter under linux. After getting the wifi connected with the right SSID (network name) and password, it should be as easy as enabling DHCP on that adapter. There is one caveat, though, and that is it could end up on the same IP range as the on-board wifi AP that you're using for the tablet connection. If that were to happen, though, simply unplugging the USB and rebooting should get your tablet link back.
 

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I guess I'd ask first if your hotspot provides an access point, and if you intend to leave it on all the time? If you do plan to leave it on all the time and it provides an access point, I would probably connect the pi and your tablet to the hotspot, and only deal with one wifi setup. If the hotspot AP won't be on all the time, then you'll probably need to go down your current plan of configuring a second wifi adapter.

When you plug in the second wifi adapter, it will appear as another ethernet adapter on the system. I don't know which tutorial you followed to have the pi host an AP for your tablet, so I can't speak with authority on how to avoid breaking that link. What I can tell you is that it is pretty easy to set up an additional network adapter under linux. After getting the wifi connected with the right SSID (network name) and password, it should be as easy as enabling DHCP on that adapter. There is one caveat, though, and that is it could end up on the same IP range as the on-board wifi AP that you're using for the tablet connection. If that were to happen, though, simply unplugging the USB and rebooting should get your tablet link back.
Hey, thank you so much for your response! I actually figured it out after a little more research. I found a tutorial on YouTube that covered this. His YouTube channel is SirReal if anyone else reading this thread is interested. The video is called raspberry on a boat #12.

Thanks again for your response, I really appreciate it!
 
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