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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all. Recently having purchased a boat, this last weekend I finally went through all the work order receipts etc from the PO. Having only bought my boat 3 months ago, I now know more about inspecting and looking at things myself than I ever did before, I imagine that knowledge should increase, and the next time, if there is a next time, I'll be way better prepared and meticulous. So anyways, upon inspection of the service records it appears I have a few major projects coming my way.

AGM batteries x 4 (6v in parallel) = 10 years old.
potential fuel tank issue
Life lines replaced in 06'
rigging inspected in 10'
Plotter not working, damaged screen (was aware of pre-purchase)
Electrical system upgraded at the same time batteries, new panel, etc..
Lines replace in 06'
Dodger canvas and sail cover replaced in 10'
Lots of engine maintenance done when PO purchased in 04'-06'
Head rebuilt and major engine maintenance in 16'.
replace screens
chainplates re-bed in 10' (but a few leak through the covers/ Im working on this)

Lots of other stuff. I could go on about what I would do a bit differently next time, for one all these upgrades that were mentioned by the broker were honestly done, its just that I was under the assumption that 'just done' met recently; not 10 years ago. My mistake, I learned something though.

I'm having the rigging inspected this weekend, at this point I'm pretty sure I need to replace the standing rigging for safety, piece of mind and safety. Plus I never found anything that said the rigging had ever been replaced, only inspected ( with n o details to the inspection).

My thinking is telling me to start with the things that are safety issues/ concerns and that have to deal with the overall well being of the boat. Replace Batteries (how ever, they fully charge and I'm leaning towards the thought that the PO really only used his boat as an office/ man cave as he was a Hollywood writer) and the boat was majority of its time on shore power. Thoughts on batteries? Engine, I'm looking at having that inspected after the fact as well. It runs like a champ, fires up first go everytime, no worries however I don't know jack about diesel engines, maybe a little but not much. Looking at taking a class when this mess is over. Really I just want someone to run some oil samples, and give me a once over and some basic knowledge of fuel filter systems, etc...

Really those are my 2 major issues that I want to have a baseline knowledge of their condition, which is why the inspections/ surveys. Most other stuff I don't feel is as pressing when it comes to the safety of my vessel and occupants.

So first I'm looking at rigging, mechanical and electrical. Seem like the most important aspects.

In the fall I will need to have the boat hauled and attack the bottom, torque keel bolts etc.. Change thru hulls, and anything below waterline that needs attention. Please feel free to advise me on things to look at and consider while boat is on the hard. I'd like to prioritize my plan of attack in order of must do out of the water items and things that don't necessarily need to be done on the hard. This will be costly as lay days are expensive, so having a list and angle of approach pre-determined would be quite helpful in order to maximize my efforts and minimize my time/$ on the hard. Thank you.
 

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Hello,

Congrats on the new boat and I hope you love it, use it a lot, have lots of fun, and learn some new skills too.

You are definitely going in the right direction. Safety first. Do research, etc.

You can do a basic rig inspection yourself. All you need is a magnifying glass, some rags, and someone to haul you up the mast too. Of course, having an expert do it would be better, but make sure they let you observe and ask questions.

My typical advice to new boat owners is to change as little as possible for the first season. Use the boat as much as possible, but don't change anything. At the end of the season you might find your priorities have changed. Anyway, if things don't work right then obviously you need to make improvements now.

Regarding the batteries: Do you have access to shore power or not? Do you plan on spending weekends (or longer) away from power, etc? If all you will be doing is day sails and you will be connected to power at night, then as long as the batteries can start your engine after a day of sailing you are OK for now. If you you don't have shore power, and will be using the boat over night then battery condition and configuration is a lot more important. A simple battery test is to turn on electric items you would normally have on during a sail - VHF, instruments, maybe an AM / FM radio, perhaps a light or two. Leave them on for 2-3 hours. Then try to start the engine. If the engine doesn't start then your batteries are definitely bad. BTW when batteries fail it's not because they don't charge (they do) but they don't have enough capacity to provide power for a long enough time.

I read a lot about head maintenance and canvas, but nothing about the sails and sail handling gear. How many sails do you have and what condition are they? Do you have a headsail (and / or main) furler and what condition is that? Do the winches work? That's a lot more important than a dodger or bimini.

Good luck,
Barry
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I read a lot about head maintenance and canvas, but nothing about the sails and sail handling gear. How many sails do you have and what condition are they? Do you have a headsail (and / or main) furler and what condition is that? Do the winches work?
Yes all winches recently serviced and working, sails in good condition, lines in good condition but old, will replace. Sails will get me through a few seasons. jib on furler (furling line replaced in 10' too), no extra sails aside from spinnaker which I'm a long way from exploring. I've been sailing her, logged up a 100 miles or so at this point. Will need to adjust the stuffing box, thats on the list for this weekend.

hnash its am 88' Catalina 36.
 

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What stood out to me was the " Potential" Fuel tank issue! Care to elaborate on that? Is it gunked up, corroded? What's the potential problem?

If it's serious that would be job # 1 in my mind.

DO stop the leaking chainplates as they could cause more serious and costlier damage if the leaking continues.

Have the batteries checked, that's a relatively easy fix, It's only money ;-)

Inspect the standing rigging and go sailing. Tune it or have it tuned. Everything else can be sorted out as time and money allow.
 

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Good advice already. Focus on all safety items first. Then maintenance items. Do not upgrade, until you've used your boat for a while.

No matter how old, new, well maintained or not, all 'new-to-you' boats have a laundry list of things to be done. I will perform all routine maintenance, unless I'm 100% certain of the last time it was done, not just told so.

Early this season, I was asked by one of the dock hands how my projects were coming along. I replied with my hands about 3 ft apart and said, "this is how long my project list is". Then I close my hands to within a few inches and said, "this is how many I need to get done to go sailing and ignore the rest". (for now) The list will never, ever be complete.
 

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Prioritize:

1 safety items
thru hulls, sea cocks
steering helm & AP
engine cooling
engine leaks - oil, fuel, water
plumbing system leaks
propane system leaks
standing rigging
running rigging
ground tackle
winch operation
dock lines and fenders
flares, harnesses, PFDs
BASIC hardware / replacement spares
VHF radio, depth sounder, speedo, GPS

2. Cosmetic & performance
sail condition
sail covers
clean,lubricate, polish stainless steel, varnish, wax etc. waterproof

3. Upgrade
electronics
AP
Sails
cockpit cushions, dodger, bimini, canvas
ground tackle
deck hardware
 

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When doing a major overhaul of my boat I found the U.S. Sailing's safety equipment requirements to be a helpful checklist to consider. It's available on-line. Even meeting coastal standards I found to be challenging.
 

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Congrats ...you are on the right course

As far as batteries...this is an area you can waste money or set yourself up for future success. It sounds like the P0 knew what he was doing there. If they are working and charging well don’t replace till necessary .

Our 6 volt Lifeline AGM lasted in excess of 10 years. All batteries require some preventive maintainence. AGM the easiest and last the longest if taken care of. Take the time to read up and learn before you replace. Figure out your daily electrical diet the type of use you will do and then work from there.

I never wanted to ever worry about what I had electronically or used so I went with 6-6 volt AGM with an amp rating of 720 ah combined or 360 usable. My daily diet is 62 after replace lights with LED and reinsulating the fridge box. That means I can safely spend 5-6 days at anchor with rechArging. We don’t have solar as we don’t cruise a lot. Our engine has an accompanying 100 ah Balmar alternator so it charges the AGM quickly ( first 75%) and AGM accepts charges quickly. 6 volt have thick plTes and you get more deep cycles as a rule.

That’s a very superficial over view but read up on this. Ask questions. Feel free to PM me.

Congrats on your new toy😀😀😀😀
 

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.....
I never wanted to ever worry about what I had electronically or used so I went with 6-6 volt AGM with an amp rating of 720 ah combined or 360 usable. .
Congrats on your new toy😀😀😀😀
Could you explain how to determine the amp hr rating when you series wire 2 6volt batteries.... if the are each rated 200ah... is it 200ah or 400ah... My uneducated guess is that it would be 200 ah for the pair in series.
 

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To make 12V using 6V batteries: Basically add up all the 6V battery amp hours then divide in half... Then use only half/50% of that number.

For example:
I have 2 each 6 Volt Size L16 Wet Cell batteries for one house bank. Each 6V battery states it has 420 Amp Hours at 6 Volts. So two making 12 Volts would give me 420 Amp Hours... Which on a regular basis I would not want to discharge more than 210 Amp Hours or 50%

Does that make sense?
 

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Could you explain how to determine the amp hr rating when you series wire 2 6volt batteries.... if the are each rated 200ah... is it 200ah or 400ah... My uneducated guess is that it would be 200 ah for the pair in series.
2-6volts combine to make 12 volt are same ah. So 200 ah is correct😀
 

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I would replace the rigging. It's too big a safety issue to "self inspect" and, without expensive equipment, even professional riggers can only inspect for obvious issues and can't see the micro cracks of metal fatigue. Rule of thumb is to replace every 10 years, insurance is the other issue around this: my experience is that an insurer won't cover rigging (or the damage failed rigging might do) after 10 years.

Good luck and look forward to hearing about your progress.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
When deciding to replace the rigging is it standard practice to replace just the shrouds or do you commonly replace the chainplates and tie rods as well? I'm meeting with a rigger tomorrow, any suggestions on things to make sure he pays particular attention too, things to ask etc..? Thanks.
 

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Depends on the condition of those components... which are easier to inspect than the wire. When I replaced my 15 year-old rigging 3 years ago, the rigger replaced all the wire components and up-sized the pins which hold the turnbuckles to the chainplates (drilling out the chainplates to the next size.) The turnbuckles were replaced, too, but that's all he changed directly associated with the standing rigging... with the mast down he also replaced halyard sheaves, VHF aerial and stitched some nice leather "gloves" to the ends of the spreaders to protect the sails from chafe.

BUT inspect where the chainplates fix to the boat, this is where poorly maintained hardware can work the hull, damaging it to the point of failure. ie the bolts pull out of the hull, even though the chainplates and bolts can be in good condition.

As an aside, the new rigging improved the boat's performance noticeably... though I suspect this is more likely to do with it being properly tuned for a change.
 

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Good advice above . Inspect the chainplates and components carefully. New rigging in bad plates doesn’t make sense.

Ours is rod rigging so we don’t have the issues that wire does. It had its own though.

Good advice in replacing sheeves when replacing running rigging.
 
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