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I am in the process of buying a 22 foot Catalina. The boat i have decided on has no motor. I will be buying a new motor. I have read some conflicting advice on the size of motor to do the job right.
Looking for a motor that will take us in and out of the inlet without a struggle.
Price is not a factor.
I hear from some a 4HP is fine and others say nothing less than a 6HP.
Looking for opinions. Also thoughts on brands to steer for and which to avoid.
The sailing we will be doing is recreational and learning.
 

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A 4hp is probably fine on a boat that size. However, I would go with a 6hp for some extra power if you need it, like fighting a strong current. Also, I would definitely invest in a long shaft model. The largest outboard manufacturer in the world is Tohatsu, and most others are just rebranded, more expensive Tohatsu's.

Tohatsu Outboard Motor 6hp 4-Stroke
 

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I don't like the internal tanks add they are a mess when you have to fill them. My last boat with an outboard had a 9.9 hp with a 5 gallon external tank. I sailed almost every weekend and refilled it maybe once a year but just disconnecting the tank and taking it with me made it real easy.

Not sure if a Catalina 22 has a spot for a tank locker.
 

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Thx Eric, Looking at your link brought up another question, external or internal tank?
If you have the space I would go with external. You won't have to fill up as often and you can detach it and take it with you to fill. However, if you are going to use it on a dinghy as well, it would be simpler to have an internal tank.
 

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We have a Tohatsu 6HP 4 stroke which runs perfectly. It has an integral tank, a little bit over 1 liter, about 40 minutes running time at wide open throttle, or can hook up to an external tank, which we use now. It seems to start a bit easier with the external tank, as it is pressurized with the primer bulb. I used to carry an extra quart of fuel which was very easy to re-fill the integral tank, but never had to use it in the boat.

Tohatsu 6hp Four-Stroke Outboard Model # MFS6CDS

I believe the 4HP & 6HP motors are the same size & weight. Based on our experience in & out of San Francisco Bay in our Coronado 25, I would recommend the 6HP, long shaft & lower pitch prop. Or, if you could find a good 6HP 2 stroke I think they are about 15 to 20 pounds lighter?

What ever you get, I recommend you drain the carb if you are not going to use it in a week or so. I have used this additive for many years with no fuel related problems, no affiliation, other additives may work as well, or better.

Fuel Additives / Treatments | Berryman Products

Paul T
 

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I had a merc 5hp 2 stroke with inboard tank on a 25ft folkboat all the power and more that I needed...and internal tank...on a spring loaded bracket it was the bees knees

a 4hp is fine...something you can carry wth one arm if need be

keep it simple
 

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Fortuitous
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I would say nothing more than 6HP.

If money were no object for me, I'd get a Tohatsu Sail-Pro. It's a 6HP, long shaft engine with the high-thrust prop and generator already included.

On my C22, I have a long shaft Tohatsu 5 with the generator and high-thrust prop added as aftermarket options (some by me, some by the previous owner) so mine is nearly a Sail-Pro, but it probably was more expensive to do it like that in the long run, and I'm missing that extra horse.

The 4, 5, and 6HP models are all the exact same block. The only difference is that the carb on the higher HP ones allows the engine to develop more RPMs, but they all weigh the same. Modern Mercuries and Nissans in this size are also rebranded Tohatsus.

The bigger considerations than HP in my mind are the shaft length and prop. Most outboards in this size are meant to get small, light boats (like dinghies and little fishing boats and things) up on plane, so they have high pitched props for high top speed and short shafts since rowboat transoms aren't that far from the water. Your C22 will never get on plane, and will never go any faster than the hull speed, so you're better off with a lower pitch, high surface area prop to get your boat moving. The long shaft is to keep your prop in the water when riding over waves.

I love my elephant ear prop.



Anything over 6HP and you're just wasting gas and making your transom sit lower in the water, in my opinion.
 

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I've been researching on this for awhile. The 6hp seems to be the accepted size for a 22 foot trailerable sailboat. Gives ya enough oomph to make progress against waves/currents/winds. Nissan, Johnson, Evinrude and Mercury are all rebranded Tohatsus at 25hp and less. The only other options are Honda, Yamaha and Suzuki. Honda only has a 5hp not a 6. For all these reasons in addition to my 45+ years in motorcycling I settle on the Yamaha. EXCEPT (there always is one lol) that Yamaha will only ship to an accredited Yamaha dealer. Who of course will add his fees into the mix and price the Yammy right out of the conversation. Therefore the Tohatsu wins.
BTW the given weights of the latest 4 stroke models (without alternator) are exactly the same as that given for my '71 Johnson 2 stroke longshaft. Howboutdat?
 

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Just to add another opinion for what it's worth, my C22 had an 8HP Yamaha on it when we bought it. I love it. Strong, quiet, reliable, easy starting, easy to work on, easy on gas when run at low to mid throttle, everything on it is high quality.

The previous owner got that large of an engine because they often sailed in the San Juan Islands, which have some strong tides and currents and I don't doubt that they needed the extra power at times.

For our sailing in inland northwest lakes, it is a little oversized and I would agree that a 6HP would probably suffice. Speed on the water tops out before full throttle.

The only thing that I don't care for about this motor is its weight at almost 90 lbs. That's a load to mount and dismount when you're trailering like we do. Why I dismount it every time is another story for another time. Otherwise, I agree with what else has been said so far.

Follow my blog at stingysailor.wordpress.com
 

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I've never understood the "strong current" thing. Hull speed is hull speed. You could hang a 25HP motor off the back, and you still won't be able to get much over 6.whatever knots through the water, right?
 

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while thats true what more hp gives you is "reserve" OOMPH if you will

while Im and advocate of keep it small and simple just enough to get to hull speed there are cases when its great to have a little more power

but just so you dont think Im a hp guzzler my auxiliary power on my islander 36 sloop is a 15hp longshaft outboard...

roughly 1hp per ton! jajaja
 

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Just to add another opinion for what it's worth, my C22 had an 8HP Yamaha on it when we bought it. I love it. Strong, quiet, reliable, easy starting, easy to work on, easy on gas when run at low to mid throttle, everything on it is high quality.

The previous owner got that large of an engine because they often sailed in the San Juan Islands, which have some strong tides and currents and I don't doubt that they needed the extra power at times.

For our sailing in inland northwest lakes, it is a little oversized and I would agree that a 6HP would probably suffice. Speed on the water tops out before full throttle.

The only thing that I don't care for about this motor is its weight at almost 90 lbs. That's a load to mount and dismount when you're trailering like we do. Why I dismount it every time is another story for another time. Otherwise, I agree with what else has been said so far.

Follow my blog at stingysailor.wordpress.com
8hp fourstroke? man thats heavy

on another thread we are talking wieght and my johnson seahorse is longshaft old 80s tech 2 stroke extremely reliable and the thing weighs the same

80lbs or so...

there is a big difference between an 8 and 15...I love yamahas btw

awesome engines my fav are the enduro versions used for panga fishermen here

most reliable engines made:)
 

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Freedom isn't free
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Did I miss what waters you are motoring in?
4hp is fine even in current for a 22 footer.

In the 4hp range you have the option of internal tank with external tank connections. It's true that 4hp and 6hp in a modern brandy new outboard will be about the same weight, and they'll also be stupid heavy (60+lbs).

An older good running 2 stroke 4hp will run you about 35lbs.

Some things to think about... if you rarely use a lot of fuel (seldom motor)... a large external tank gives LOTS of reserve, but also SITS a long time. Without starting another ethanol is crap debate... lets just say, sitting modern fuel isn't good for a motor.

If you are talking about buying new... I strongly recommend you consider buying a LEHR propane 5hp. My opinion is the initial outlay for a slightly pricier external tank (fiberglass), puts the motor slightly higher in price than its' equivalent 4 stroke gas, but it pays off in an easier to maintain cleaner running outboard.

If I were buying new, LEHR would be my first stop. I am told they are mostly the guts of a Yamaha. I think most of the modern small 4 strokes are made by Tohatsu

PS: I have no affiliation with them, and couldn't care less, I've just spent a small fortune maintaining motors over the last 4 years. I didn't buy my boat to maintain a motor, and hate working on them. I'd prefer something rock solid and nearly maintenance free. My 3.5 HP 2 stroke (when it runs right) gives me hull speed at 3/4 throttle.
 

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aka $tingy Sailor
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Just a word about the whole hull speed debate. You can look at it like a car.

If you have to pull out of a parking lot and cross four lanes of heavy traffic to get where you're going and you can only do a maximum of 35 mph, would you rather have a Yugo or a Yukon? Your top speed will be the same in both but one will get you there quicker than the other.

What's true on the street is true on the water; "There's no replacement for cubic inch displacement." It's an exaggeration, of course, but you get the idea. And the prop matters too. In the present reality, we're not talking about a big difference anyway.

Just sayin'

Follow my blog at stingysailor.wordpress.com
 

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All depends on the waters you sail in. We had a Coronado 25 in & out of San Francisco Bay, which can be very nasty at times, strong currents against big winds make for serious chop inside and big capping swells outside. We started with a 6HP 2 stroke which was Ok in calm conditions but struggled in bad conditions.

We went to a 15 HP 2 stroke, same size & weight as the 9.9HP. End of struggling, it would punch through anything that you wanted to punish the boat through at hull speed.
The 9.9 HP would probably been enough, but there were a few times we had the 15 flat out to maintain speed.

I would think the 6 HP Tohatsu, with long shaft & low pitch prop would get it done on a 22 foot boat. As the 4HP & 6 HP are the same size & weight, I would suggest the 6 HP.

Paul T
 

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Yes- the same situation as exists with the 9.9 and 15 hp. The 4 hp and 6hp weigh the same and fuel consumption difference is negligible. Why not have more power? Except with the 4/6hp difference: is an alternator available on the 4hp?
As far as electric start- you must go to the 8hp to get that.
 

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For what it's worth, I forgot to mention that the Yamaha F8M comes with an alternator. At least this one did. It is supposed to put out 10A at full throttle.

I just installed the rectifier/regulator (not included) and will be testing the output soon. The results will be on my blog.

So, if battery charging is or will be an issue for you, this is something else to consider. If the output is enough for my needs, it will eliminate or delay the need and additional expense of a solar panel setup.

Follow my blog at stingysailor.wordpress.com
 

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Most boats i see in the 22 ft range here in the great lakes have 8-9.9hp outboards. My Edel 665 has an 8 hp yamaha which is great for motoring out with a full load of passengers.


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