SailNet Community banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
To power a Cape Dory 25, I'm buying a new Tohatsu 9.8 with electric start, remote control/shifter, and 25" shaft.

My question/concerns are as follows: The company from whom I'm buying the engine wants $365 to install it (above the price of the engine, a bracket to disable turning). The install price seems excessive for a job that shouldn't take more than an hour (at most). They also want to tack on a charge for the cables required for the shifter. Charging for cables required to use a system that I'm already paying more for (remote shifter) seems to me like paying not just for a car radio but paying extra for the cables required to connect it. The company also suggests that for the warranty to be valid, they need to install and tune it (thus making their install required).

Does all of this seem normal? I'm not against paying for quality, but the price on the engine keeps going up and up!

Advice is welcome.

John
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,867 Posts
To power a Cape Dory 25, I'm buying a new Tohatsu 9.8 with electric start, remote control/shifter, and 25" shaft.

My question/concerns are as follows: The company from whom I'm buying the engine wants $365 to install it (above the price of the engine, a bracket to disable turning). The install price seems excessive for a job that shouldn't take more than an hour (at most). They also want to tack on a charge for the cables required for the shifter. Charging for cables required to use a system that I'm already paying more for (remote shifter) seems to me like paying not just for a car radio but paying extra for the cables required to connect it. The company also suggests that for the warranty to be valid, they need to install and tune it (thus making their install required).

Does all of this seem normal? I'm not against paying for quality, but the price on the engine keeps going up and up!

Advice is welcome.

John
"Price to install it"? In our area service prices are about $100 per hour. So, depending on how far he has to drive, both ways, plus an estimated 2 hours to mount it, install the cables and wiring, mount the shift/throttle controls, test it, & so on, the price may not be all that high. Having done a couple of installations, I would guess at least one hour, probably more. Nothing is easy.

"Charging for the cables"? All depends on their pricing structure. Some dealers may price individual components, while others may quote a "package price? One way to compare is to get A "turn key" quote from another dealer, which would include everything, including installation.

Paul T
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,064 Posts
I have never done an installation of an electric start outboard motor with remote control and shift cables but I have installed a new inboard diesel with new controls and cables and electrics and instrumentation. And having done so I would absolutely agree to having a pro installer do it for 365 bucks. Took me appreciably longer than an hour (more like eight hours with the routing and hanging of cabling and wires and the continual going below for one thing and coming above decks for the next) and a good bit of head scratching and planning.

The reason I did my own was I wanted to learn from it and to know my boat better.

And yes...you have to pay for all the bits needed. The control system is not free with the motor purchase.

I don't think anyone is trying to rip you off. Either pay the man or do it yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,346 Posts
I really don't think you need a 9.8 I say a 6hp. And for sure you do not need a e/start . A motor like you are talking about should have a thumb screw to hold it straight . Forget about the remote stuff . Just prop the lid up to get at the shifter . Plus the 6hp. will make a fine dink motor .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,857 Posts
I think that installation is certainly more than a one hour job. Control cabling would vary from boat to boat depending on the length required. Doesn't seem excessive to me.

I agree with fryewe - pay the price or install it yourself.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,867 Posts
I really don't think you need a 9.8 I say a 6hp. And for sure you do not need a e/start . A motor like you are talking about should have a thumb screw to hold it straight . Forget about the remote stuff . Just prop the lid up to get at the shifter . Plus the 6hp. will make a fine dink motor .
I can only speak from my own experience. We had a Coronado 25 on & out of San Francisco Bay, which can be nasty, at times. Long story short, we started with a 6HP 2 stroke with a lower pitch prop than stock. It was OK in calm conditions, but marginal, for us, in big nasty chop & strong currents. We changed to a 15HP 2 stroke, and lower pitch prop. Most all of the time we only ran it at about 3/4 throttle, but at times we used it all. Probably, the 9.9HP would have been OK? This was from 1970 to 1980

The 9.9HP & 15 HP were the same size & weight. The well in the Coronado worked really well but was a bit hard to get into. If I was to do it over, I would definitely get electric start & the remote shifter/throttle arrangement.

"Don't work hard, work smart". :D

Paul T
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
Hi John, welcome to Sailnet, hopefully you'll hang around beyond this thread!

First, $365 is not a lot of money to spend at a boat dealership, or a boat yard either.

From a quick check of a few Tohatsu outlets, the dealer is being truthful about the warranty issue:
NO SHIPPING ON REMOTE MODELS
Tohatsu does not permit the shipment of any remote model engine
As for charging you for the cables, this is appartently the standard from Tohatsu:

NOTE: Kits do not include the (2) 33C universal control cables for throttle and shift (these should be purchased locally based on length required).
This only makes sense, as the length of cable needed will of course vary widely from one model boat to another. The cables can't be extended, and there's also not a lot you can do with cables that are longer than needed.

While some say you don't need the 9.8, electric start, I'm sure you made an excellent choice there. Hell, on some sailboats, where an OB is squeezed into a well, the Tohatsu power tilt might make sense, too.

Pay the money and enjoy! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
I put a Yamaha 9.9 on my 4200 lb O'day 25. I appreciated the power when running head on into heavy chop with 20+ wind. A big difference between the Tohatsu and Yamaha is that the Yamaha has the shifter on the tiller, just behind the throttle. Easy to reach. When entering and leave the slip my hand is on both tillers for better steerage at very low speeds. Instead of investing in a remote setup I went with power tilt. Great back saver and the admiral can now lower and start the OB if needed.
That said, I agree with the others that $365 seems reasonable for a quality install of remote controls.
 

·
Old enough to know better
Joined
·
4,345 Posts
You should have bought a power boat.
And you should have kept your fingers off the keyboard, so I guess you'r even.

As others have said the price does not sound outrageous. It does suck to pay a big chunk of change to have something installed after laying the money out for an expensive piece of hardware. If you want to cut costs you could go with a used motor. My preference would be to find a used 2 cycle as the new gas outboards just seem to sensitive to fuel freshness for my taste. It does not seem to make a difference as to manufacturer either. Even if it was the same price for a well rebuilt 2 cycle vs new 4 cycle I would go 2 cycle. Yes they smoke a bit, and are noisy, but they will start every time!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,867 Posts
And you should have kept your fingers off the keyboard, so I guess you'r even.

As others have said the price does not sound outrageous. It does suck to pay a big chunk of change to have something installed after laying the money out for an expensive piece of hardware. If you want to cut costs you could go with a used motor. My preference would be to find a used 2 cycle as the new gas outboards just seem to sensitive to fuel freshness for my taste. It does not seem to make a difference as to manufacturer either. Even if it was the same price for a well rebuilt 2 cycle vs new 4 cycle I would go 2 cycle. Yes they smoke a bit, and are noisy, but they will start every time!
Totally agree. I have had many 2 strokes over the years. Properly maintained,
that being new plugs once a season, mine were bullet proof, simple, and substantially lighter than comparable 4 strokes. We bought a 4 stroke 6 HP Tohatsu for our fishing boat a year or so ago. It is a bit fussy about how you start it, but it runs perfectly. It weighs about 60 lbs, about the same as a 15HP 2 stroke we had.

Bought the 4 stroke because of the existing ban on carburetor equipped 2 strokes on nearby Lake Tahoe. Otherwise, I would have looked for a good used 2 stroke.

Paul T
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
I think if you check some outboard online sites, you'll see that the remote throttle / shifter / ignition plus associated wiring and cables are a separate equipment purchase... before any installation.

Consider the installer will be drilling the wall of your cockpit footwell to a) install & seal the controls, b) route and secure the cables & wiring, c) testing everything, and finally, standing behind the installation. In my experience, your quote is fair.

Last year I needed to have the boatyard repair my remote-control outboard setup... I needed a few parts where the cables connect to the engine, and parts and labor for that was $200.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top