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I've decided to bring back a Alberg 30 to life from the depts of despair. I plan on doing extensive cruising but sadly money is tight so I'm looking to find a project boat and work on it over the next 2 years. The boats in this range have either no engine or the engine needs replacement. So I'm thinking of converting the lazarette into an outboard well and removing the old Atomic 4 engine. Assuming all goes well what does everyone think of cruising with an outboard?
I'll be going with a long-shaft 9.9 hp Nissan or something similar with a reserve tankage of 4 x 3 galon cans. I know I won't be getting the same range as an inboard diesel but given the shoe string budget and wanting to keep the engine as simple as possible is this a viable solution for long-term voyaging?
My thinking is that with good routing/planning I'd keep motoring to a minimum and sail most of the time whenever I can. And money and space for the existing engine can be used for better purposes.

Cheers
 

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An Alberg 30 is a lot of boat for 9.9 hp outboard.

The lazarette is aft of the rudder, so control under power isn't going to great.

Why not a smaller boat that already has an outboard well designed in?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
agree but sadly the Lazarette will only first 3 Gal size tanks. (at least based on the current design i'm thinking of)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks arbc
In Terms of maneuverability, the outboard well design allow the engine to be rotated for 90 degrees of thrust in whichever direction. This renders the boat much more maneuverable compared to the inboard which is a pain to back up.
 

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Fair enough, my brother has an Alberg 22, and it has the same arrangement. Outboard well aft of the rudder, outboard can rotate like you describe. It works on the 22. He uses a Honda 5 hp on that boat, which is 3500 lbs.
 

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Ten hp should be adequate. I know of a Triton that does well with an 8 hp, and it's only about 600 lbs less than the Alberg 30.

After the A4 is removed there will be plenty of space to install a 12 gal tank, or even larger. It has to be installed to meet ABYC specs. They don't appear too cumbersome. By the time you buy 4 tanks and the necessary fittings, you could probably buy a permanently installed 12 gal tank for not much more.
You can get some guidance at this link. https://www.westmarine.com/WestAdvisor/Fuel-System-Installation-Checklist
 

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You can fit a lot of rum and canned goods into that old engine space.
Plan it so goods are secure.
I would have zero gas stored inside. Thats just me...
What do you plan to do with her?
Where are you going?
Pretty boat
 

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One consideration is power generation. Many (most?) outboards in that size don't have a rectifier to generate 12v power, although you can add them to most it seems... even then they don't put out anywhere near the amperage that an alternator on a diesel might. Not saying that's a plan stopper, just something to consider if you think you're going to have significant power draws (fridge etc).
 

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You don't need even significant power draws, GPS and VHF will drain the batteries to the point where it will take a lot of outboard running time to replenish. Lights and pumps add a bigger deficit. A portable generator is a possible option.
 

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One consideration is power generation. Many (most?) outboards in that size don't have a rectifier to generate 12v power, although you can add them to most it seems... even then they don't put out anywhere near the amperage that an alternator on a diesel might. Not saying that's a plan stopper, just something to consider if you think you're going to have significant power draws (fridge etc).
I agree, I am looking to make my trailer sailor into a cruiser and think the limit of the outboards power output will be the limiting factor. I am thinking if he can't afford a working inboard, refrigeration is unlikely also.

It seems like taking a boat removing the motor and altering the transom to fit an outboard will be an extensive task. A used 9.9 will likely cost you $1000 new with alternator $2400. I don't see this as a money or time saving alternative. That time and effort would be better spent rebuilding an Atomic 4. The ability to have a better source of DC generation and maybe hot water would benefit you in the long run.
 

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For power generation, in this situation, you could consider going with having a solar panel and close to zero electronics.

LED nav Lights, a simple VHF with a small screen that displays numbers only, tablet for navigation, basic alcohol stove, hand pump for water, no fridge.
 

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I've decided to bring back a Alberg 30 to life from the depts of despair. I plan on doing extensive cruising but sadly money is tight so I'm looking to find a project boat and work on it over the next 2 years.
Be careful, this math rarely works. Bringing a boat back to life, often costs more than one in seaworthy condition already. IMO, the only boats worth resurrecting are those with strictly cosmetic issues. Mechanicals, rigging, sails, decks, engines, etc, cost more than they're ultimately worth. Almost every used boat sells for some fraction of the dollar that was actually spent on it.
 
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had a Honda 9.9 on the transom of an o'day 27 which is a pretty heavy boat. Pushed it fine to 6 knots in smooth water. That honda never let us down and generated 12V for charging. Could augment with some cheap solar as well. Maybe a prop change for your particular boat?
 

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If you are like us and only use the engine to get in and out of marinas, very limited powering at sea and prefer to sail if at all possible, a 10hp outboard will be adequate for powering in low wind/wave conditions. We cruised in a 20,000# boat with only a 25hp auxiliary and never felt the need for more power. FYI, Yves Galenas of Cape Horn Self Steering fame sailed an Alberg 30 around the world solo without an engine. Later on he made a mount for a larger outboard (25hp?) for cruising the Intercoastal Waterways that necessitated a lot of powering. He has a DVD of the trip that's well worth the price. http://caphorn.com/en/integrated-models/ I wouldn't give up the lazarette for the outboard. Would use a transom mount to keep it from robbing valuable storage space. Not the best location for engine location in significant seas but those conditions are almost never encountered without wind to sail.

Even if the outboard has generating capacity wouldn't expect it to supply much battery charging capacity. The alternators or whatever on outboards seem to have pitifully small output. Would want solar/wind charging capability as the primary battery charging source. If you keep the boat simple with limited electronics, no refrigeration, etc you can get by with with modest charging capacity. We cruised/lived aboard without refrigeration and got by just fine. There are a lot of people on this list that you can only cruise in a 40' plus boat with A/C, Refrigeration, Surround Sound Big Screen TV, etc You can easily circumnavigate with a hand held VHF, 5" display plotter, LED nav and interior lights with limited a minimal solar/wind charging capability. For me, sailing is not about lugging all the detritus of a condo out to sea.
 

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I cruise an Allied Seawind 30 with a 6hp Tohatsu on a stern bracket and so far don’t really miss the inboard diesel after it failed.

My boat is 12,000lbs and the outboard pushes it at close to hull speed at half throttle.

The real difference comes when docking, the small outboard prop doesn’t have a ton of bite and the boat cannot be stopped quickly. The learning curve is steep and I avoid docking whenever possible and when I need to it takes a few go arounds to get the angles right. And it took a few bruised ego days to get even remotely adequate at docking

I have 135 watts of solar between a 35 and a 100 watt panel and 450ah of battery between four gc2 batteries.

With a little care I haven’t had issues running batteries low.

It’s all in what you can deal with

Jeff
 

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The real difference comes when docking, the small outboard prop doesn’t have a ton of bite and the boat cannot be stopped quickly. The learning curve is steep and I avoid docking whenever possible and when I need to it takes a few go arounds to get the angles right. And it took a few bruised ego days to get even remotely adequate at docking
If your outboard takes it a high thrust prop can help with this. I put one on our Yamaha 8HP (not a high thrust model outboard, but has a high thrust prop available for it) and it helped quite a bit with reversing and stopping... seems to help a bit with going forward but I didn't notice a change as much there as with the stopping power. FWIW.
 
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