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I have a Pearson 28. The inboard is shot. I will repower at some point in time later this year, when I have cash in-hand. In the short term want a motor. I am thinking about an outboard motor mount. Any idea what this does to the resell value of the boat in future? Assume that I will do an inboard repower.

Thanks,
Scott
 

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How about if I left it in place and sold with an inboard and an outboard?

Scott
Hard to say. I guess if I was a prospective buyer considering two or more of the same boat I would prefer one that hasn't been modified or had extra holes drilled into it. Also, unless extra bracing was added I might be concerned about the extra stresses on the transom, visible or not? It might not matter to some buyers but overall I don't see it as a benefit. Just my opinion, offered at no cost and for what it is worth. :)

Paul T
 

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As someone who owns a 1970 boat your at the that rock and a hard place point as unless you score and almost free motor your never going to recover any money if you are selling as the boat is expected to be in functional condition

My A4 powered Cal 29 surveys out at higher value than most of the diesel ones as many are of the diesels are hack installs or the boat has other serious deficiency's
 

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I think it's gonna depend on when you sell the boat...

If you haven't done the repower the mount will be appreciated...

If you have done the repower, it may still be appreciated as a better mount then the rail for dingy motor...

Unless the buyer is a "purist" an added mount shouldn't "detract" from the value...

And untill you repower or sell the boat you need a way to get in and out of the slip, so who cares what other people think... it's needful...

Either that or bite the bullet and do the repower..that will add to resale value, but probably not enough to cover the cost...

So almost any way you look at it you lose...except for the part where "you" get to use the boat...so again, who cares what other people value...?
 

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You will be unlikely to recover the cost of a new inboard anyway so I would not worry about any minor reduction in resale value from adding an outboard.

The outboard will get you sailing now at a low cost, and when you get around to a new inboard you can rethink how to deal with the outboard bracket.
 

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After you repower, get a small dink and keep the dink motor on the bracket. That could be considered a bonus.
 

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Scott, there's a school of thought that says anyone who bolts an outboard onto a boat in order to avoid inboard repairs is a butcher. And was too broke to keep up with routine maintenance. In that school of thought, they'll just walk away from your boat.

The other school of thought is hey, it's cheap and I want a cheap boat, I don't want to sink in another ten grand for an engine. I think that's the minority point of view.

Personally? I'd see the outboard and quietly turn around and walk away. If you absolutely must, find something that CLAMPS on, making no holes. And you'll need a deep shaft engine with a sailboat prop on it if you want to get decent use of it. And the money you spend on that, will make it harder to fix or replace the inboard.

Is your inboard absolutely for certain toast? Totally unrepairable? Or would it just make sense to sell the boat now as "needs engine" and take the loss as it is?
 
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