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Regarding mix only 2-cycle oils, for older air and watercooled motors;
I would like to know which oils have provided the best success for you in your 2-cycle tender motor. Least amount of plug fouling, exhaust spooge, easiest starting, etc. Did you study flash points, viscosities and settle on a TC-W1/2/3 pre-mix? Are outboard engines really that much cooler running? Problems with separation, rust, smell?
Yamalube, Klotz Super Techniplate, Honda, Mobil, hardware-store special, Maxima, etc., what are your preferences for mix?
I'm not looking for a pure castor oil, but maybe a 80/20 mix or pure synthetic seems like the solution for many 2-strokes and curious about outboards, air and water cooled

For the air-cooled weed eaters on my property I've always used Maxima 927 at 40:1 but in my research the last couple of days I see it has a high flash point and castor oil. Regardless of these race qualities it was fast starting, had a clean piston, and always a coat of oil on everything when looking through the spark plug hole. Lower EGT's from outboards has me directed towards those TC-W3 oils for an older outboard outboard, but fear them as low spec oils sound similar to CAFE requirements and use of low-zinc motor oils. Basically, are TC-w3 oils really effective, or are they consumer,EPA/Warrenty solutions? For a few bucks i can try a bunch but wanted to hear what you folks are using regularly. Thanks in advance.
 

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I have a Yamaha 8 2 strk. and I use yamalube My engine is a 100:1 and I always mix a tiny bit on the heavy side, no smoke, no fouled plugs, no "spooge".
 

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How much older would these outboards be?

I recall in the 60's mixing 50:1 outboard oil for 2 hp Seagull outboards and doing the same mix for 250 hp racing outboards in the 1990's. I still use that ratio for my dink motor (15hp Mercury) today.

This is really too simple for me. The only research I have ever done on this is reading the label on the oil bottle and brand doesn't matter to me.

Do you guys turn everything into a science?
 

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I have a Yamaha 8 2 strk. and I use yamalube My engine is a 100:1 and I always mix a tiny bit on the heavy side, no smoke, no fouled plugs, no "spooge".
Me too, albeit with a Yamaha 6 hp.
 

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I have had many 2 stroke off road motorcycles, both air & water cooled. Tried many kinds of oil. Finally settled on Red Line synthetic at 50:1

Also have had many 2 stroke outboards, large & small, all water cooled. Before synthetics were on the market, I used many different petroleum oils, all at 50:1. Then they started labeling oils for air cooled & water cooled applications. I always used the WC designated oils. finally went to Red Line synthetic, I think it was designated WC? I have read that it is important to use the proper designated, air or water cooled, oil, both petroleum or synthetic. Synthetic oil smells awful, like burnt erasers. I think it smokes a bit less than petroleum oils?

I had a 2 stroke road racing Kart, used Blendzall, which was castor oil based, smelled good. That motor used to turn up to 11,000 RPM & occasionally run a cylinder head temperature of 400 degrees & it never seized, gooey exhaust residue, however.

Many, many oil choices, all saying they are the best. Most/all outboards that I have seen
since the late 50' have fixed high speed jets, so you are not likely to seize them by running too lean., but the gas/oil mixture can be critical. I stayed with the manufacturer's
spec of 50:1 when switching to synthetic, although I read that you can run up to 100:1 with synthetic, "you bet your motor" :D

Paul T
 

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Does it really matter? Do you really gain anything by burning expensive synthetic oil?

My outboard is 50 HP (I have electric trolling motor on my dinghy), and I have never had a problem just using the cheapest TC-W3 I can find at the specified 50:1 blend ratio.

My feeling is don't try to outsmart the manufacturer's recommendation. Do what they say by doing what they recommend. No need to buy their brand of oil, as long as you get one that is industry certified at the proper rating. Get a "W" type if it's water cooled.

Never had any problem attributable to the oil I use.
 
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How much older would these outboards be?

I recall in the 60's mixing 50:1 outboard oil for 2 hp Seagull outboards and doing the same mix for 250 hp racing outboards in the 1990's. I still use that ratio for my dink motor (15hp Mercury) today./QUOTE]

The really old British Seagull outboards had a 10:1 ratio. Gradually, they raised it up to 25:1. "The Best outboard for the world" was anything but that, unless you factor in the notion that so much oil in the mix would make those motors last forever. Fouled plugs, filthy exhaust, "spooge", excessive noise and weight were all part of the um...er...uh... "charm".

Makes me think any of the complaints raised for 50:1 or 100:1 motors we commonly see today are quaint!
 

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Does it really matter? Do you really gain anything by burning expensive synthetic oil?
I can only speak from my own experiences. Top end was the same with petroleum or synthetic. With the advent of electronic ignitions, late 60's?, plug fouling was a thing of the past, assuming you had it jetted properly. Maybe the synthetic smoked a bit less?

My outboard is 50 HP (I have electric trolling motor on my dinghy), and I have never had a problem just using the cheapest TC-W3 I can find at the specified 50:1 blend ratio.
I have had 8 different 2 strokes, large & small, totally agree.

My feeling is don't try to outsmart the manufacturer's recommendation. Do what they say by doing what they recommend. No need to buy their brand of oil, as long as you get one that is industry certified at the proper rating. Get a "W" type if it's water cooled.

Never had any problem attributable to the oil I use.
For many years I was a massive "tinkerer", always thought I could make it "better", seldom turned out that way. One thing I never changed, that being the manufacturers recommended fuel/oil mix ratio. I bought my first new outboard in 1947, a Johnson 5 HP, IIRC recommended mix was 20:1. I think at that time they sold "outboard" oil, that was it, used to buy it in 2-1/2 gallon round cans, which later could be used as gas cans.

Anyway, I ran that motor for 40 years, cheap oil & all. Part of the pitch on synthetic was that you could run 100:1, but with my later motors I stayed with 50:1

I don't remember the incremental cost difference between Petroleum & synthetic, but I don't think it was double?

As mentioned, I ran bean oil in my racing Kart, at 20:1, but I think "nowadays" the serious bike & Kart riders use synthetic? Maybe for extreme use synthetic is better? However, for stock outboards probably either is fine?

Paul T
 

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I use any good quality marine oil. Emphasis on marine, as it contains additives to encourage more rapid breakdown in the marine environment, so it's less polluting.
 

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I have a Yamaha 8 2 strk. and I use yamalube My engine is a 100:1 and I always mix a tiny bit on the heavy side, no smoke, no fouled plugs, no "spooge".
I have the same engine. Yamaha put out a service bulletin changing the mix to 50:1, which I have been using since I got the engine. (rebuilt it a year ago, so I'm technically still bedding in, which would have called for 50:1 anyway)

It's a brilliant outboard, btw!
 

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I agree with the 50:1 cheap tcw3...

Everyone always "overthinks" oil...if it is slippery it is good;)
 

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I agree with the 50:1 cheap tcw3...

Everyone always "overthinks" oil...if it is slippery it is good;)
The problem of course is when something breaks even if it's the throttle linkage, and the oil mix is "not recommended" your warranty and oil companies will say "What did we tell you???" and then run for cover. :p

But I'm also a 50:1 anything-goes user.
 

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The problem of course is when something breaks even if it's the throttle linkage, and the oil mix is "not recommended" your warranty and oil companies will say "What did we tell you???" and then run for cover. :p
Interesting theory that a company would deny warranty coverage on your throttle linkage because you didn't use their recommended oil in the gasoline. The two are totally unrelated, and a company that did that would create so much ill will that complaints would be posted all over the web.

So what examples do you have of something like this actually happening?
 

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115 HP 16 year old Yamaha on my fishing skiff: whatever TCW-3 that might be on sale at NAPA or Advance Auto. Same for my 8 HP 9 year old Nissan dinghy motor. The motors have been bullet proof dependable.
 

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nothing like oil threads!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Interesting theory that a company would deny warranty coverage on your throttle linkage because you didn't use their recommended oil in the gasoline. The two are totally unrelated, and a company that did that would create so much ill will that complaints would be posted all over the web.

So what examples do you have of something like this actually happening?
I'm guessing you missed the little smiley thingy at the end of that statement.

I haven't anything further to add.:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p
 
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