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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have a reliable mechanic who travels to look at our 4hp Tahatsu for the dinghy. Don't want to have to lug it in the SUV.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not many places around that will do that anymore, Dave. Especially, the smaller engines.

What is the engine doing? Maybe I can help you a bit.

Gary :cool:
Pretty sure it has varnish in the carb. Has some bad gas in it. Also it stalled out last year when i would put it into gear unless i raised the rpm some
 

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Sailor
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2 stroke or 4? Try running sea foam carb cleaner through. It sounds like the carb needs to be cleaned. 2 stroke engines are really easy to remove the carb, take apart and soak in seafoam cleaner. The 4 strokes are not difficult but the jets are smaller making it difficult to clean. They have to be cleared by pressurized air.

I have used Lincoln at MasterTech Marine, Atlantic Resort in Pasadena for repair and he is competent and will walk you through doing it yourself if you need help without charge. His number is (410) 437-7052. He might be willing to come and get it ??

Good luck,

Tod
 

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Tartan 37
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Probably need to disassemble let the carb and clean it...I've done this on mine. It's fairly easy, and if you want to ensure the gaskets and all are in good shape Defender sells carb kits for Tohatsu. I keep a spare on the boat.

I won't be down this weekend, have a conference to go to in KC, but would be happy to do it with you one week night next week perhaps.
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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Not many good traveling outboard mechanics. Travel time eats up their day and there is enough business to keep them in their shops with better tools and supplies.

Rebuilding a carb is only spooky the first time.

You'll want to drag the engine ashore anyway to avoid the risk of dropping fussy little bits into the water. You'll want a sawhorse tall enough to clamp the outboard on and muffs for testing. A sheet of cardboard to avoid dripping anything on your workspace is helpful (MD Clean Marina). You can use a bicycle pump or dinghy pump to generate enough air for a carb rebuild in the field; most dinghy pumps have adapters for fenders that help increase pressure.
 

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Most outboard carbs are very easy to disassemble and clean. I've done dozens of them, and the smaller motors are the easiest. I use Gumout and lacquer thinner for the soaking, then steel wool the needle valves and blow out the jets with canned air. Most of the time, that's all it takes, however, there are times when you need to flush the entire fuel system, tank and lines, with some solvent to get out all the nasties that have accumulated over the years. You would amazed at the stuff I've removed from the insides of built-in fuel tanks.

Good luck and I hope everything works out OK for you,

Gary :cool:
 
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