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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a Beneteau First 235. It has a Nissan 9.9 on it now and it didn't start when I got the boat. I havn't took it apart yet but it got me thinking about buying a new outboard. What size do some of you have and what would get if you could get what you want? I want the smallest lightest thing I can get away with. I plan to use this boat for racing and cruising around Charleston SC with maybe a longer trip here and there. What size shaft do I need? Tohatsu makes a 6hp 25" shaft that would be sweet but I really want an internal tank, to get that I have to go to a 20" 4hp motor. I'm wondering if that would work? I basically have to push off the dock and I'm sailing, the boat before my Catalina didn't even have an engine, and I sailed that thing around here for over a year like that. What are some experiences and opinions? Thanks
 

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6 hp would be the min i would want unless i was a small lake sailor. a 9.9 is over sized but sometime the wind and current will make it the perfect size

yes you want as long of a shaft as you can get
 

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Outboard size for 23ft sailboat

For small boats, engine power is related to boat displacement. A sailboat outboard should be a small as possible (low engine weight and correct proppellor pitch) The last one is mostly forgotten.

The formula is roughly, 4 hp per 2200lb

Then go to the internet to find a propellor calculator to determine your propellor size.

Petrol engines are mostly lighter than diesel (Tohatsu)

Good luck!!
 

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4 Hp

Hello,

My catalina 22 came with a long shaft Tohatsu 4 HP motor with internal tank. In flat water it would reach 6 kts. I never motored much and that motor worked great for the 1 year I owed the boat.

Good luck,
Barry
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Long shaf

Thanks, Barry by long shaft I suppose you mean the 20". I'm leaning toward the 4 hp Tohatsu because I like having an internal tank. the boat supposedly weighs 2500 punds. I did an online calculator that suggested a 5hp to reach hull speed. Thanks





 

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Discussion Starter #6
Pulling my own chain a little!

Hmph, have to write 3 characters.
 

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The problem is the currents in Charleston can be wicked...you need a bit extra there. I'd go with the 6hp. As to the shaft length...it should be measured from the top of the transom mount to the surface of the water. You may need a long (19-21" measure) or an X-long if more than 22".
 

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I would go with 6hp..I have a Columbia 22 displacement 2200lbs. I use a 4hp Yamaha and wished at times I had 6hp...The 4hp can be a bit slow getting to
"Rudder Speed" some marina's are tight and its best to get enough speed fast to get rudder...Also going out or coming in against a tide can be a bit of a grind..Not another feeling in the world like having almost full throttle and no head way......You will also tire of an inboard tank should you get a few miles out and boom the wind drops to zero, the extra fuel is worth it,trust me:)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thrust

Thats a good point with the thrust issue. It would be nice to have that quicker acceleration. I'm 50-50 torn between the 6 and 4. Someone mentioned a 5 that had an internal tank. The wind around here is pretty reliable. I've been sans engine on my last boat and only once the whole year had to anchor and wait for wind, there was actually wind just not enough to fight the current. I just need it for docking, when I cruise I'll carry the extra tank. Hopefully 'll have this boat for years to come so I want to make the right decision. I guess it would be better wanting less than more. Hmmm. best case scenario its perfect :) Thanks for the input, getting me thinking.
 

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We have an old Suzuki 8 medium (20") shaft on a Chrysler 26 (5000lbs) and hull speed is never and issue . . . unless there are waves and the boat hobby horses. Then the propeller comes out of the water repeatedly and screams. Get the longest shaft available! Honda makes a really good 5hp and 8hp with 25" shafts. I imagine the 4 stroke 5hp Honda would be more powerful than my 2 stroke 8hp Suzuki. If we keep the C26 we will buy the 9.9 (25") Honda. Btw . . . I spoke with a Coast Guard mechanic and he swears the Honda is the most dependable outboard made. I'm not married to any brand. I love our Suzuki . . . it's just too short.
 

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Buy the 4 hp. If you need the additional 2 hp just buy the 6 hp carburetor and bolt it in place of the one that comes on the 4. The 4 hp Tohatsu is a 6 hp engine with a restricted carb on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks

Just the info I was looking for! I'm going to look at the Honda 5hp and compare prices with the 4hp Tohatsu. Thanks
 

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Hmm

Buy the 4 hp. If you need the additional 2 hp just buy the 6 hp carburetor and bolt it in place of the one that comes on the 4. The 4 hp Tohatsu is a 6 hp engine with a restricted carb on it.

Does that mean I could have the 5 or 6 hp with an internal tank by swapping out the carb? or does the larger carb use the space where the tank is? Thanks
 

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I use an 8 hp on my Oday 23 (which is heavier than your boat (over 3000 lbs.). It is more than adequate. I'm no expert, but I haven't seen an outboard larger than 4 hp with an internal tank, and 4 hp is definitely too small, especially if you have to deal with currents.

For shaft length, 15" is standard; 20" is what is considered a "long shaft". Some manufacturers also offer 25" models. If you can, go for the extra length. The first time you are in any sort of seaway, you will appreciate it.

Also keep in mind that if you buy a new engine, you no longer have a choice of two vs. four stroke engines; they haven't made new small two stroke engines for a few years now. This is good for the environment and your fuel consumption, but also means that you need to make sure your outboard bracket can handle a four stroke engine. There are two reasons you need a stronger bracket: fours weigh more than their hp equivalent twos; and fours generate more torque. There have been a number of threads here debating whether you really need a bracket rated for a four stroke. A number of posters have questioned the need for a four stroke bracket if they (for example) have a 8 hp four stroke engine to be put on a bracket rated to handle a 20 hp two stroke. The 8 hp four stroke weights a lot less than a 20 hp two stroke, but how much of that is offset by the increase in torque? I have no idea.

The practical implications of replacing a two stroke bracket with a four stroke can be considerable. The new bracket might require drilling thru the transom, adding support on the inside of the transom, replacing or augmenting the "spacer" block (that angled hunk of fiberglass between the bracket and transom), etc. Nothing insurmountable, just enough of a pain to make one look for every reason to keep the existing set up.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Sailing!

If I'm in enough wind to make a seaway I'll be sailing :)

Seriously, I've thought that it would be nice to take enough fuel and have an extra long shaft so if I'm offshore and there is a swell without wind, I can motor home. Realistically though I've never had that problem. Generally if there isn''t enough wind to get you back there isn't enough wind to get you there in the first place. :)

I have turned around because I felt like the wind was dying, and I didn't have a motor if it did. I really wouldn't want to anchor in a busy rolling inlet.

Also it would be nice to have something to get me out of the way of all the huge ship traffic in Charleston, that and something for around the dock is why I'm leaning towards the 4hp. It'll probably be a few weeks before I get something so keep the opinions coming and I'll let you know how it turns out.
 

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Misanthrope
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Snider,

Yes, buying the 4 with the internal tank and then putting the 6 hp carb on will give you a 6 with the internal tank....Or you might wait a week and see what new model engine gets released for the 2010 model year:) There is a six with internal tank that is coming out....But, I think it will only be in the 25" leg model. You can look on our website after August 1st to see when they will be released.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Thanks

I was looking at your site before you chimed in here and was more than likely going to order through you guys anyway :)

Whats your opnion on length shaft and size for what I'm looking for? Still say 4hp 20"? Thanks Brandon


Edit: Forget I aked that, just found the long thread over in gear and maint. on Tohatsu. I'll make my own choice :) any words of wisdom though would be nice.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Weight

I guess all I'm saving by getting the 4 over the 6 is some money, especially if a 6 with a internal tank is coming out. The only way to go lighter would be the 3.5. So I guess the 6hp extra long shaft internal tank model would be the wise choice. Unless the weight goes up due to the tank. Hmmmm this is getting interesting.
 

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Misanthrope
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The weight goes up two lbs on the internal tank model or will once they release it. Discusions about shaft length usually end up with agreement that people get by with a 20", but a 25" leg makes it an all weather outboard.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Prop

Nice. I have the same boat as that other fellow with the long outboard thread. I think that new model will serve my purpose perfectly. If I look you guys up online can you set me up from the start with the prop you suggested for my boat? Thanks Brandon
 
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