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1982 Helms 24
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am headed back down to my boat tomorrow and I hope someone can help me out with the outhaul. I don't have any pictures with me, but I would like to understand how the outhaul works for the Helms 24. Currently I have some pulley's and line, but it does not look like enough line. Does anyone have a diagram of how this one works or pictures?

thanks
CMessa
 

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This brochure https://boatbrochure.com/products/helms-24-brochuremight have the detail you seek... but it might not. A picture would help a lot, since otherwise we have to guess. Though it might take a while, you could also try looking for pictures of Helms 24's to see if any include a helpful view. My guess is that the outhaul dead-ends at the outer end of the boom, goes through the clew of the sail, back out to the end of the boom and then forward to a cleat somewhere on the boom where you can get to it. It may be internal, so you don't have to worry about it snagging your head when you tack. Going through the clew gives you a 2:1 purchase, which may be enough on a boat this size. If there is a block and tackle setup inside the boom, all bets are off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know, I should have a picture, this is the best I have right now.... I was hoping maybe someone had a picture that would help me out before I got down to the boat. I know we will figure it out, but I like to work things out in my head before I am at the boat.

What you said makes sense from what I remember, I just know that the only cleat I have is all the way at the other end of the boom, near the mast. I don't have enough line to go that far. It is not internal and there is a shackle at one end of the line that connects to the clew. The other end connects to the boom near the aft end. I have attached a picture of the boom, but there are two pulleys on the other side that I can't find a picture of yet. I actually don't think that pully you can see is related to the outhaul at all, looks to be going in the other direction. Maybe there is a reefing system involved here too.....

I will check out that link you sent, if I could find some manuals for these Helms boats, that would be awesome!
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Sounds like the outhaul needs to reach the cleat at the forward end of the boom. It's usually placed there so you can ease the outhaul on a run, even after you've let the boom all the way out. With the black band where it is, the line that shows dead-ended on the port side seems suspiciously outhaulesque. The cheek block does look like part of a reefing setup. That line would likely lead to the gooseneck, then down, and then back to a winch somewhere.
 

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My Selden boom is set up with a car at the aft end which the clew of the main is shackled to. That car is attached to a wire which runs over one of 4 blocks at the aft end of the boom to unseen connection to a line inside the boom. That lone exits at the forward end of the boom is led to a block attached to a ring on the mast and then through leads to the aft end of the boat where it is cleated.
 

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Lots of ways to rig an outhaul and no way to know if yours was changed at some point. So even if someone chimes in that owns a Helms 24, it may or may not help you. Take some better pics and someone may be able to help.
 

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As pointed out above, there is insufficient information to generate precise, step-by-step instructions, however here are some general rules:
1) if the mainsail is attached to the boom all along the foot (boltrope in a slot, or sail slugs in a slot), then it is sufficient for a beginner to just tie a short loop of light line between the clew cringle and some fixed point on the end of the boom. Experience will tell you how tight to tie it. Start with just hand tight.
2) if the mainsail is loose-footed (attached only by the tack and the clew), then it is designed with more adjustment in mind. However, you can probably start with just 2 loops: one through the clew and loosely around the boom (it must be able to slide at least a little bit) and one to the end of the boom like above. There could be a dedicated strap for around the boom.

The whole point is just to stretch out the foot of the mainsail on the boom. The hardware may become more obvious once you have sailed a few times.

Also, it looks like there is a block for a reef point on the boom. You can figure out reefing later (just sail in lighter winds the first few times).
 

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1982 Helms 24
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
As pointed out above, there is insufficient information to generate precise, step-by-step instructions, however here are some general rules:
1) if the mainsail is attached to the boom all along the foot (boltrope in a slot, or sail slugs in a slot), then it is sufficient for a beginner to just tie a short loop of light line between the clew cringle and some fixed point on the end of the boom. Experience will tell you how tight to tie it. Start with just hand tight.
2) if the mainsail is loose-footed (attached only by the tack and the clew), then it is designed with more adjustment in mind. However, you can probably start with just 2 loops: one through the clew and loosely around the boom (it must be able to slide at least a little bit) and one to the end of the boom like above. There could be a dedicated strap for around the boom.

The whole point is just to stretch out the foot of the mainsail on the boom. The hardware may become more obvious once you have sailed a few times.

Also, it looks like there is a block for a reef point on the boom. You can figure out reefing later (just sail in lighter winds the first few times).
Thanks for the information. I was able to get down this weekend and with all the info from this post, I was able to run the outhaul from the fixed location at the aft of the boom, through the clew, over to the other side of the boom and through a pulley. Then I had just enough line to make it to the cleat at the front of the mast and tie it off. Seemed to work fine! I am sure there could be more adjustments made, but we managed to sail for about 3 hours and nothing broke, so I think we are OK.

I want to look into the reefing more, but for now I am fine sailing in lighter winds. Maybe next spring I will dig into that more. I found that lubricating slides for the main sail and bearings in the furler is probably going to needed sooner than anything else!!

thanks for all the help again everyone!
 

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Sounds good Cmessa! You can always tweak the outhaul arrangement as you get some experience. McLube is a great product for lubricating the sail slides. A bit pricey, but worth it. As to lubing the furler, check the manual or go online to figure out what the MFR recommends. All are a bit different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
@paulk Thanks for the link to the brochure! I got my reproduction yesterday and it looks great. It is really cool to see the standard options and what was available as an extra! It is supposed to have shag carpeting in it someplace, lol!

It would be cool to see a Helms 24 with some of the optional features, mine has a few, but the inboard motor would be awesome to see. I definitely have the room for it, but would like to see how they managed to put it in there. I have never seen one online with an inboard motor.

Cmessa
 
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