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Looks nice.
I wonder what the chances are that the Ryobi 18 volt lithium batteries would work in this unit? A few years back I found a 12 volt high speed charger for the Ryobi batteries and it's like magic! 20 minute charge for hours of run time. But it was expensive and it is pretty big, therefore I wouldn't like to have to have a second 18 volt system aboard.
Did yours come w/the AC adapter or was it and added expense?
The plugs are different between the brands. I'm sure that's intentional.

DeWalt also makes a high speed charger, if that matters. Although, when I run the generator, it's usually for at least 90 mins and can't ever recall the 18v even taking that long with a regular charger.

I should add something about the DeWalt. I think it says to leave the filter in for Wet vac ops, but it works substantially better if you remove it.
 

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The problem with most inverters is the waveform is not usually a pure sine wave, but instead a modified sine wave or in some instances, a square wave. Most motors will run, but not efficiently, and the same holds true for microwave ovens - Don't ask how I found all this out. ;) My inverter is a modified sine wave and is rated at 2500-watts, has a built-in circuit breaker and it is connected to my bank of house batteries just 19 inches away with heavy-duty, tinned, battery cable. Sure sucks down a lot of battery when you use the microwave oven, which is the same as the OP's shop vac - 750 watts.

Gary :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Sure sucks down a lot of battery when you use the microwave oven, which is the same as the OP's shop vac - 750 watts.
Thanks, Gary, that about settles it. Just remembered I recently picked up a DeWalt drill kit which came with two 20V batteries and a charger, so I'm only looking at ~$100 for their vacuum with the AC corded option. It's bulky and won't stow as nicely as the little Shop Vac, but otherwise it seems like an upgrade all around.
 

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We bought a portable rechargeable Dirt Devil at a factory outlet store. It sucks in more way than one ;) Not cheap and not good.
On the other hand, we bought a 12v mini shop-vac style at, I think, Princess Auto in Canada (like Harbor Freight). We have that on the boat and it works great. Can't recall make, but probably no-name from China. It looks like this one, which was selling for about $20 on eBay.


Kind of cheap unit and would not recommend for live-aboards. OK for occasional use.
 

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baja-
The consumer market for vacuum cleaners could have been written for the ToolTime tv series, if you remember that. "More Power!" and higher numbers must mean better, even when they don't. (As in golf scores.(G)
You get the same thing in home hair dryers, it is very hard to find one under 1600 watts, which happens to be the full load that a 110-120VAC line with a standard 15 amp fuse can safely cary. (Or the wiring in the wall can handle.) And that's the only reason they stopped the war at "1600" watts.
With your shopvac, that's probably one hp rated output power, which means it could be 25-50% higher input power needs. And since a motor is an inductive device, another 25-50% more power during the starting surge. So the power demands get really ugly fast, yes.
Some vacuum makers (like Dyson) stopped playing the "More watts must be better!" game and use more efficient motors instead. But generally, vacuums are advertised like monster trucks. The less MPG they get, the better they must be?
I don't think your battery vacuum will be able to compete with a shopvac, but by the time you try to provide 2000W of DC inverter power on a boat...getting the job done a little slower won't seem so bad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Thinking about the 12V versions has now begged a parallel (pun intended) question: assuming the 12V model vacuums tout the same "1HP ~ 745W" spec, that still means 60A. That's a lot of juice for the typical cigarette style accessory plug on a boat, and it isn't directly attached to the battery like a big inverter but instead fed by the spaghetti of 18ga wire and 15A fuses in your average DC boat system. I expect the fuse to blow immediately upon startup, and even if for some reason it doesn't, then the wiring and DC panel and everything else between the lighter plug and the battery will be getting pretty warm pretty quickly.

Or so I think.

And then I see the specs for FreeAgent's automotive style vac:

Voltage: 12V
Current: 5A
Power: 90W

90W is a lot less than 745W. So either it's way more efficient than my little 1HP Shop Vac, or it's only 1/8th as effective. Hmmm...
 

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The DeWalt does not plug into the cig lighter. To run on DC, it uses a rechargeable battery. Alternatively, it plugs directly into a 110v AC receptacle and doesn't require the battery at all. Naturally, you recharge the battery with a 110v device as well.
 
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