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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking to paint the hulls on my new project cat and was thinking about going with a dark blue or navy. Any disadvantage to a dark hull color? I guess it would get hotter in direct sunlight but are there other issues? I don't want to do the standard white but i'm not sure how dark to go???

I was thinking about Awlgrip Marlin blue for instance.

Any opinions would be appreciated.
 

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Telstar 28
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What is your project cat made of. If it has a foam core or uses epoxy resin, you'll probably want to stick with light colors. Foam core and epoxy resin-based laminates have a fairly low thermal deformation point, and if painted dark colors can distort in sunlight. :)
 

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Hunter 33.1
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In Florida definitely a light color. I spoke with a Coast Guard pilot who did not like white boats because they blended in with the white caps during heavy weather. BTW my boat is white and will be repainted white, the heat here in New Orleans is just to much for dark colors. I made the mistake of painting the non skid on an oDay 25 I rebuilt years ago light gray and it was to hot to walk on bare footed in the summer. It was repainted quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hmmm. Yes the boat IS epoxy resin. I REALLY don't want to do white but maybe navy is not the way to go. If you are familiar with Awlgrip's Marlin blue, I wonder if that would be too dark???

painting the non skid on an oDay 25 I rebuilt years ago light gray and it was to hot to walk on
Double Hmmmm. I was thinking of blue hull with a white deck and light gray nonskid. That may be an issue.

Out of curiosity, how dark was your nonskid. Was it similar to Interdeck's gray or was it a true light grey with non-skid added in. The reason I ask is that I have thought Interdeck's grey is a tad on the dark side.
 

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Telstar 28
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Marlin Blue is pretty dark, especially if you're down in Florida, and have an epoxy resin boat.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
SD,

Would you consider Marlin blue TOO dark. i.e. a no go.

I am OK with a warmer hull as I don't plan on much time in the hulls and the boat is nearly 30 years old so the epoxy resin is quite hard and aged...I don't think it would be as susceptible to softening from heat anymore. Then again, I could be wrong. :rolleyes: I don't need a saggy boat:eek: :D
 

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Hunter 33.1
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Double Hmmmm. I was thinking of blue hull with a white deck and light gray nonskid. That may be an issue.
It was 1990 and it was the lightest gray Brightside Polyurethane Interlux produced. I would suggest that you do a some testing before you lay down the paint it will save you time and give you peace of mind.

Good Luck
 

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It was 1990 and it was the lightest gray Brightside Polyurethane Interlux produced. I would suggest that you do a some testing before you lay down the paint it will save you time and give you peace of mind.

Good Luck
Yes, the grays can get surprisingly hot in direct sun. Try to keep it as light as possible -- sometimes this will require blending it a bit with white.

We had gray non-skid on two previous boats and it was fine. But it was a very light gray.

As for the hull, given how you plan to use the boat, I would paint it whatever color you want. There is something very satisfying about indulging your preferred paint scheme. It's not often we used-boat owners get to do that.:)
 

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One disadvantage of painting a white hull dark is any chips in the paint will be very noticable.
 

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I am a wee bit partial to red, but that's another story. On the inside of the hull I can feel at least 10* difference in the white strip, and the rest of the hull. We have so much ventilation, and insulation I don't think I would notice the difference in heat, but another boat might.

Imagine is epoxy cold molded, and she has spent nearly 7 years in Florida with nearly half that time in the Bahamas, and S. Florida. 3+ years in the Caribbean before I bought her. I have never noticed a problem with the epoxy, and I have had to do some repairs. Notice...I did say never noticed. Now SD has put fear in me......lololol....i2f
 

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SaltwaterSuzi/CapnLarry
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Do NOT paint a white fiberglass boat hull a dark color. The heat difference in the laminate affects any uncured resins - and there are always some. The resins will cure further and shrink to the point that the weave of the fiberglass itself will show. I've seen it several times.

If you have access to a temperature gun point it at a dark hull in the sun and then at a light hull. The difference is amazing - like up to 120 degrees different. Egg frying temperatures.

We have, here at Hartge's, a professional painter who has been in the business for about 25 years. He is an awlgrip expert. He advises never to paint a light colored boat dark - he calls the affect 'print-through', if I remember correctly. Some people refuse to believe him claiming their boat is old enough that there could be no further curing. He painted one boat about two years ago - a big power boat - that was built in the late seventies or early eighties. The owner insisted on dark blue. The boat's hull now looks like a dark blue waffle.
 

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I concur that white has a big advantage in hiding the dings and chips that come with age...reason alone to go with white.

Whatever color you select, be sure to see a boat actually painted in the color before committing, as the small chips can be somewhat deceptive, If you don't actually see the paint on a boat, you may be in for an expensive surprise.
 

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moderate?
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LarrySue...I have had two white boats painted awlgrips darkest blue and sailed in the tropics. Neither had print through. It all depends on the boat and the layup. (and the quality of the prep work and job). And dark blue is arguably the prettiest color for a boat.

That said...I would never paint a boat ANY dark color if heading to the tropics. They get WAY too hot to touch even the INSIDE of the hull and add to daily amp use on the fridge. Other than the heat factor...the dark colors are a pain to keep clean as every little thing shows.

I like Mainesails light "stars & stripes" americas cup blue a lot and that might be a good choice if something other than white is desireable.
 

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Telstar 28
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Yes, and AFAIK, age has little to do with the thermal deformation characteristics of epoxy resins. :)

SD,

Would you consider Marlin blue TOO dark. i.e. a no go.

I am OK with a warmer hull as I don't plan on much time in the hulls and the boat is nearly 30 years old so the epoxy resin is quite hard and aged...I don't think it would be as susceptible to softening from heat anymore. Then again, I could be wrong. :rolleyes: I don't need a saggy boat:eek: :D
 
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