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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 25 Irwin that I am planning to repaint the full topside.

How much should I plan to spend, and what are the proper steps? I am a professional painter and plan to paint using a HVLP inside a ventilated spray booth. If there is a better way I am all ears.
 

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OH, the topside. glad I caught that before I posted my first response. My new to me boat is painted. I cant help personally although I have seen lots of tutorials that look pretty straigh forward. I will have to follow for any pointers as I will be doing this again oneday. If you search here or even yahoo it you will find a bunch of good advice and vids, etc...
 

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I've never sprayed one, but have done a number by roll and tip. If your experience is doing cars, there won't be much difference. If your used to doing houses, you'll have to pay a lot more attention to surface prep. The surface must be absolutely perfect or the high gloss paint will accentuate rather than hide any blemishes. Not just smooth but fair. Long hours of long-board sanding to eliminate hollows and lumps. A lot of pros add a little flattener to the paint to give some"hide".
Also, spraying LP paints (Imron, Awlgrip), can be dangerous. Supplied air respirators must be used or the drill will be : Spray, spray, fall down dead.
 

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First, a clarification is required. Do you really mean 'topsides' (ie the hull between the waterline and the gunwales) or do you mean cabintop/deck/cockpit? Sorry if you've got it right but it's a common confusion.

As a pro painter you'll know that prep is all. I've sprayed Awlgrip with a HVLP unit (sort of like a reverse vacuum cleaner and pressure pot) and it turned out OK, not 'pro'. (Far from perfect but perfect from afar ;)) Could easily have been my technique rather than the tool, in any event it was a very easy convenient setup to use. I borrowed it from a friend that refinished tubs and showerstalls as a sideline.

Temp and humidity control was another likely factor in our 'less than pro' result, but with a booth that should be manageable.

If you're doing the deck, then the application of nonskid areas becomes an issue not present when doing the hull/topsides. We painted the non non-skid areas first, then taped off the nonskid parts, and sprayed Awlgrip and a mix of griptex in a single application. Very uniform and looked great, not the most effective grip though - it did get better with time as some of the paint wore off the grip (not visibly)

If I was doing it again I think I'd look into something like kiwigrip for that part of it.

Suggest removing as much hardware as you can manage - again not a big deal if you're doing the hull, potentially a bid deal when dealing with winches, stanchions, handrails, etc.

Another issue when doing the deck is access... at some point you'll have to 'walk and spray' on some areas - it's a challenge too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, I am looking at doing the hull between the waterline and rails along with the deck. Everything on the deck needs to be reseated so I figured I can kill two birds with one stone.

I have both experience In a body shop and painting new construction.

Saturday I went out to torreson marina and they had a bunch if paint reps out there. It looks like awl grip is the winner. Just need to wait for warmer weather to get started.
 

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Sounds like you'll do fine. Just make sure there's no scaffold posts in way of your normal spray 'fan' pattern - ie where you're arm is moving. Don't ask why I know this ;)

I liked the Awlgrip, but many recommend their 'Awlcraft' product so check that out. Others will say that Interlux Perfection is also easier to repair after the fact.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think I should be set.

My main thing is cost. Anyone out there have any idea about what I am looking to spend?
 

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I haven't done it myself, but I've had it done, so take this from once it came. Once it worked out well, once pretty bad.

In the bad job, they tried to use a rotary sander. The glossy result was a like a fun house mirror.

In the good job, they used something called "high build" and then long board sanding with boards about 4 feet long (hard work). They used some sort of blue stuff between sandings, to find the high and low spots. They kept going until that all went away. The glossy result would allow you to shave from your dingy if you wanted to, nearly perfect reflection.

This was all in dark green, I think white maybe more forgiving. Good for you doing this yourself!
 

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Dark Green will be a tad more forgiving than Black or dark Blue, but for a nice, distinctive forgiving colour we used Whisper Grey.. different enough to stand out against all the other bleach bottles, but not so critical on the fairing front.
 

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I think I should be set.

My main thing is cost. Anyone out there have any idea about what I am looking to spend?
Well that is the killer, with the price of paint today, I would say don't worry about it and just sail it like it is. But if you are in the business that is likely not possible! Though I had a next door neighbor who was an auto body guy, and very good at that, who drove beaters. Never could understand that one.
 

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Sounds like you'll do fine. Just make sure there's no scaffold posts in way of your normal spray 'fan' pattern - ie where you're arm is moving. Don't ask why I know this ;)

I liked the Awlgrip, but many recommend their 'Awlcraft' product so check that out. Others will say that Interlux Perfection is also easier to repair after the fact.
I've decided to use Interlux Perfection with Interlux epoxy undercoat, which is a great undercoating, for the next hull paint job. I just used it on the topsides (white) and liked the way it brushed on. Was planning to do the hull with Awlgrip again but the cost of the stuff now would make me feel downright foolish paying that much for paint. I have spray painted two other boats with Awlgrip but am protesting with my feet at the current price. Maybe the Perfection isn't quite as hard or durable as the Awlgrip but I'll live with it. When you bump into something, it doesn't matter what kind of paint. You're going to have a ding anyway. After a number of years any finish will need repainting. Price being even remotely similar, I'd pick Awlgrip but having used both would say they are both excellent paints.

Humidity and temperature are the two big variables when painting outdoors, especially with roll and tip. I've seen some disastrous results with Awlgrip roll and tip because of impatience in waiting for the right conditions. I can tell you from experience that Interlux Perfection will dull off if you paint too late in the day and nightime moisture hits it before it really sets up, so paint as early as possible. Awlgrip sets a lot quicker, almost like an automotive acrylic lac. and can be double coated, if spraying, almost as quick as you can get around the boat for the second coat.
 

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Just FYI Awlgrip can be rolled and tipped, OR sprayed... Awlcraft 2000 is spray ONLY. The advantage to Awlcraft is that it is a buffable paint, Awlgrip is not. Alwcraft can be buffed back to perfection, Awlgrip can not. Abosolutely DO use a flatener with the deck, or the super high gloss of the paint will show every single flaw. If you do any roll and tip, you must tip asap with the flatner added, or you will strip out the flatner as it floats to the top and will be left with areas of high gloss, and flattened streaks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I am thinking about PPG Delfleet paint for the boat versus Awlgrip or Awlcraft.

Anyone have good results with Delfleet?
 
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