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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the early stages of preparing to paint my 81 Cat22 for the upcoming season. Right now it has some type of antifouling paint that stays on your hand when you rub it or anything else it touches not to mention it kinda looks like broken egg shell in places. This makes for a less than smooth bottom and I am assuming more drag. I have really been reading the last week on what to go back with and just not really sure what direction I should go. I originally had decided to do a barrier coat and then paint over it to get the paint scheme I wanted. After reading some other posts it got me thinking maybe I do not even need a barrier coat. The boat sits on the trailer year around when not sailing. I live in Kentucky mostly sailing on water here and plan to do a few trips a year to the coast lasting about a week to two weeks at a time. Its mainly for racing. I have some cracks in the gelcoat that I have sanded down to the fiberglass to inspect and seems to be just that cracks in the gelcoat with no damage to the under layer of fiberglass. So questions are:

1. Do I need a barrier coat?
2. Do I need antifouling coat?
3. Neither but I do need to cover the bare fiberglass with a primer? before
I put a new coat of paint on.
4. What type of paint should I use?

I have read where some guys say you want a smooth bottom others have said you want a less than smooth bottom with lines running along the hull to grab the water and keep you going straight. Some paints are really expensive. I really do not think I need that. I am just starting and mainly racing on a small inland lake.

I just truly have no idea.
 

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A barrier coat is not necessay and not recomended. The probability of osmosis increases if a barrier coat is applied to an old boat.

If the boat is in the water for the race, one or two days, you do not need a antifouling. You can always check the situation after you remove the boat from water. If you see a lot of life on the hull you have to use an antifouling.

It is always a good idea to apply the primer of the antifouling before you paint the boat. It increses the adhesion of the antifouling.
 

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I'd just do a smooth epoxy bottom coat, and be done...
the problem you presently have is there is already ablative on it... so you are likely going to need to take the bottom down to gelcoat... best way to do that is soda blasting (use a service that has done it before)...

then you can use something like VC Performance Epoxy... it'll keep short stint drops in the water fouling down, and also provide a pretty mirror smooth finish...

Don't forget to fair the hull, long board it.. and consider shaping the keel and rudder.

While you are at reducing drag, remember sails are equally important to produce lift and reduce drag... bagged out sails are a bear to get proper shape.

None of this will do you any good if you can't get your starts down (mine stink)... I do great on the rest of the course, and lousy at the starts, and it kills me every time.

I am assuming you are doing One Design racing with your Cat 22... those folks can be pretty hard core... and what a great class to do OD in... inexpensive boats, that are as common as you can get... Good luck! Study up on their tuning guides!
 

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One of None
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"A barrier coat is not necessay and not recomended. The probability of osmosis increases if a barrier coat is applied to an old boat. "

Uh... what?

I've watched my friends painting sailboat bottoms every spring based on the need to win races... sorry, I just don't buy into paint making that difference worth the cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The boat is a 81 model with many years of wear and tear. Part of the reason for addressing the bottom is for a faster boat but the other reason is me wanting to make her look good as well. I have a paint scheme in mind that I really want. The dull bottoms or pain color white or gray color do not appeal to me. When looking at the Catalina22.org website you see all this pictures of races from seasons past and man some of those boats look good. That is what I am after as well as having a faster bottom. Problem I am having is that the barrier coats do not seem to come in a variety of colors. Or do they and I am just not looking in the right place? Thinking maybe just going with topside paint? Or maybe even an imron paint? Cuss cuss spit spit automotive paint?
 

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One of None
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do you know if the boat is in the water fresh or salt, more than a few days it will have slime or growth on it that quick?
 

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Barrier coat is also a primer...
Typically you'd do barrier coat on a boat that has been soda-blasted, to make the glass more "waterproof." What you apply on top of the barrier coat is YOUR call..

If you want smooth, the VC Epoxy is an option... As far as getting colors on top of your smoother than a baby's behind, er, bottom, I don't know I've really seen people do that. I suppose you could just as easily do a 2 part paint over the barrier coat. Not sure it'd really hold up well though, something like perfection. But honestly it isn't really designed for below the waterline.

Many anti-fouling paints come in various colors... like VC17m extra, comes in 3 colors, copper, red, and blue, but each goes on looking pretty "copper" in color, because that is the primary ingredient in its anti-fouling. Still other ablatives (which I would not recommend for your situation) come in red, blue, black, green, like Ultra...

I'd still lean on performance epoxy in your case (white).
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
do you know if the boat is in the water fresh or salt, more than a few days it will have slime or growth on it that quick?
Something to think about. As far as using it in Kentucky not worried about it at all. It has never stayed in the water more than two days since I have owned it. I have a fish/ski boat that I left in the lake for a week at a time never had any problems with it. As for staying in the Keys for a week, will that cause me problems, I do not think so but I really do not know.
 

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Antifouling does mostly two things. It deters barnacles, which are really a concern only in salt water, and algae, which can happen in either salt or fresh water.

If you only keep a boat in salt water for about two weeks, you might see a few tiny barnacles just starting to grow, but they should be easy to scrape off. The longer you leave it in the water, the bigger and more numerous they'll be, and the more securely they'll be attached.

The algae that grows on a boat in the form of slime is, I believe, a single celled organism. You won't be able to see it until it has grown for awhile, but it's there nevertheless, and algae creates drag and increases the boat's wetted surface, and it slows the boat. The slime that usually accumulates on a boat hull in 2-3 weeks can be scrubbed off fairly easily, but, it grows faster in an inland lake that is surrounded by farm land, because, when it rains, manure washes into creeks and thence into lakes, and that makes algae bloom.

Antifouling paints deter both barnacles and algae. If you only keep the boat in the water for a week or two at a time, you can get by without antifouling, especially if you scrub it after each haul-out. Personally, I would apply a hard finish racing antifouling paint.
 

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I haven't used Petit Vivid, but my friend uses it on his boat and likes it. It is a multi season, hard finish anti-fouling paint, good for racing and for trailer-launched boats, and it comes in a variety of bright colors. It sounds like it meets all your requirements.

Barrier coat is used to protect against blisters. Blisters became a major concern for boats built during the period from about 1984 until 1989. Your boat was built before that period. If blisters haven't become a problem after 33 years, IMO it's unlikely that they will become a problem. If they do, you can always barrier coat it then.
 

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I would respectfully disagree with sailormon6.. Blisters are a problem with nearly every layup of fiberglass... certain period glass boats are MORE prone than others.

My 1982 Catatlina Capri 25 had 4 or 5 blisters... from places that were not addressed with bottom paint (they were under the pads of the trailer, and looked like they were only painted with every 3rd or 4th time the bottom paint was applied).

My 1982 S2 7.9 has a few small blisters just now forming. The later years of the S2 7.9, from 1984-newer are less likely to have issues, but they aren't immune. This was a very well maintained and raced S2 up until about 2008.

My 1989 Catalina Capri 22, had about 4 blisters forming on it when I got her, from again, a neglected bottom. That boat was always trailer sailed, but water was against the hull on the bunks continually, and it was under the bunks where there was a problem.

My 1986 Catalina Capri 142, was a strict trailer sailor with a bare bottom... nothing but gelcoat. It was a lovingly cared for boat, but it developed blistering in the forward half of the boat... they were JUST starting to form when I sold her in 2008. I actually think the water intrusion was from inside on that one.

I have heard good things about Petit vivid. I am pretty sure when you do the bottom job you'll still need a barrier coat though.
 

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I would respectfully disagree with sailormon6.. Blisters are a problem with nearly every layup of fiberglass... certain period glass boats are MORE prone than others.
Isn't that what I said? "Blisters became a major concern for boats built during the period from about 1984 until 1989." That's not to say that blisters were never a concern outside of that period. I had a 1974 fiberglass boat and a 1981 fiberglass boat, neither of them barrier-coated, and each had a few very superficial blisters, which I easily repaired whenever they appeared. Neither of them ever had a widespread problem with them, or a problem that might result in delamination.

Catalinas built in 1989 were given a barrier coat from the factory. If your 1989 Catalina Capri 22 had any significant blistering, then either the factory coating must have been misapplied, or a prior owner must have sanded it away (more likely). As I recall, beginning in 1989, Catalina warranted their hulls against blisters for 5 years, but the warranty was voided if the owner sanded the protective coating away or otherwise damaged it.
 
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