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I bought a '79 Columbia 29 this spring, and at first the paint looked great, but because we have a dog on board, I wash the boat about once a week. Here it is the middle of August and I have paint peeling all over the place. I am starting to wonder if the previous owner didnt us e a hardner or maybe just slapped cheap house paint on it. Any suggestions on repainting it, cost, and how long it should last?
 

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We painted our 1961 Columbia 29 MkI decks 3 years ago. I think that is that part of the boat you are talking about here. I used Interlux's epoxy primer, and at a few peoples recommendation Brightsides on the deck. It looked great to start with, but 3 years on it looks kinda shabby in the high traffic spots. If I was starting from scratch again there is no doubt I would used the Perfection epoxy style paint. We used Perfection on the topsides and it is extremely hard and scratch resistant. It's taken 3 years of wood dinghy abuse rubbing the sides in stride.

The only plus about Brightsides are it's price and it's easy to touch up. The downside is it needs touching up.
 

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Barquito
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Painting a boat correctly is either a lot of work, or really expensive. Doing it yourself involves removing deck hardware (sometimes trivial, or really difficult), and tons of sanding. However, if you do the work yourself, the supplies only cost something like $500. If you are using Interlux products, I would use Brightsides on the topsides, and Perfection on the deck. Perfection is sensitive to wind, temperature, and humidity. You need to pick your days.
 

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Barquito,
Nice looking boat first off! What's your reasoning with brightsides use on the Topsides? Just for touch up reasons? I've found Brightsides to be completely intolerant of water contact. Meaning where my decks run off to the scupper holes in the toe rail, there is a small area where water will collect after a rain. After two years this started to peel and come up. :/ Also where I left my mainsail battens on deck for the winter water collected under them even with the cover on and peeled it the first year... The perfection however seems to almost be impervious, after 2 years with a small section near the waterline under the water all year towards the bow it shows no signs of coming off. Next boat repaint is an epoxy style/ LPU paint all the way!

Yea I found Perfection to be touchy to wind and especially sunlight. When they say to apply it in shade they mean "APPLY IT IN SHADE OR ELSE" luckily I learned that on the first coat! :)

Yea deck work involved pulling all hardware and fittings save the mast which was up, and the windows which the previous owner had just installed. I don't think it came out too bad. If I'd have used a nonskid paint on the top sides over the brightsides it probably would've worked out tons better.
 

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I used Interlux Interdeck non-skid on my boat - after three years the deck is still looking great. I did the cockpit when I first got the boat also with Interdeck and after 10 years or so it was still looking good. I redid the cockpit when I had to replace some of the core because of water into the Balsa Core - when I redid the whole boat I mixed gray and white to get a lighter color than the base gray that tended to get hot when the sun was out, even here in Seattle.

see below for the article I wrote on the "adventure" of painting

I added sprinkled on a larger grit to more grip.


The New Non-Skid | Boating Safety Tips, Tricks & Thoughts from Captnmike
 

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I am surprised how many choose a less expensive and less durable paint, like Brightsides, over Perfection. The expense in a paint job is labor, whether paid out of pocket or one's own hours sanding and prepping. Why invest all that only to cover your work with less than the best, which today is a two-part polyurethane? We are probably talking less than $200 difference here for a 30 footer.
 

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Barquito
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Nice looking boat first off! What's your reasoning with brightsides use on the Topsides?
I used Perfection on the deck and topsides. I guess what I was trying to say, is that if you were going to use Brightsides anywhere is should be the topsides, rather than the deck. I used Brightsides on my dinghy b/c I plan on sanding and repainting every few years, anyway. I told myself that if I ever paint a boat again, it will be indoors (or at least under a DIY cover).
 

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Painting a boat correctly is either a lot of work, or really expensive.
It is work, plan on doing a lot of sanding. When it's all said & done I'll be into it for a boat buck + for materials. Primer-$150, Paint=$540, Kiwi Grip, $200-300. Toss in sand paper, rollers, thinner, etc.

Glad it's only 28', couldn't imagine doing this to a 40'
 

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I bought a '79 Columbia 29 this spring....
The last Columbia 29 was built in 1969. Might you mean the Columbia 8.7?

I have found Brightside to be quite durable. My bridgedeck was painted with it after I installed a new traveler in a different location about 4 years ago. I live aboard and step on it daily and it has held up well.

Interlux Interdeck is basically Brightside with grit added.

I would bet the prep was badly done.
 

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The last Columbia 29 was built in 1969. Might you mean the Columbia 8.7?

I would bet the prep was badly done.
My Columbia rolled off the line in 1961. There are still plenty of these old Columbia's around. With solid hand laid up hulls and conservative engineering they've held up well and represent a great value for a good sailing cruiser. I took 2nd in my Division in the Clipper Cup race on Lake Michigan! :D

No my prep work was pretty much flawless. I've worked at auto body shops and painted many cars and motorcycles, and 3 boats of my own. Used lots of different kinds of Lacquers, Acrylic, Enamel (on a classic 1950's Cadilac), Water based ect. Anywhere that water stays on Brightsides for more than a day its gonna come up from my experience. I'm glad others have had good experience with it. I'd hate to think my friends purposely steered me wrong.

As was said, for just a little more money you get an LPU paint which is superior in gloss, gloss retention, hardness/ scratch resistance, adhesion, and water tolerance. It's a pretty easy call if you're doing a large project. I know I won't ever bother with Brightsides unless it's on a dinghy. For me using it on decks was a mistake. I have many scratches it just seems really soft to me compared to many of the other paints I've used.
 

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The Columbia's were not badly built, especially the early ones. Later ones were not as well built.

The original poster stated he has a 1979 Columbia 29. That doesn't exist.

In 1970 I worked for a company that built the interiors - all wood parts - for the Canadian Columbias.

Sorry you had such bad luck with Brightside. It has worked well for me and many others. What did International Paint (AkzoNobel) have to say about your problems?

Yes Perfection is a better paint, harder and glossier. Does require more care in application and is pricier as well though.
 

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Sorry for not checking back sooner. I never bothered calling Akzo Nobel. I probably should have after the first winter when it started peeling. I'd heard this would happen if you used it on a dinghies bottom left in the water so I figured thats what was going on. I just chalked it up to live and learn. I'll be applying another coat to the decks again this upcoming spring, because I'm locked into using it now I'll see how it holds up. I'll also plan to get around to finally putting down some nonskid... :) Hoping that might help keep the scratches down, or at least being able to see them.
 
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