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My yard wants me to replace the teak deck on my 1983 Passport 40. I'm unclear as to whether it really leaks or if it's chainplates or another source that would be less expensive to repair. I'm unclear whether deck leaking has been a problem for Passport 40's in general. So far I've not read about delamination problems in the 40's. Also, does anyone know what year Passport 40's went to airex cored decks from plywood? An airex cored deck should be less susceptible to delamination from leaks, I assume, but again I'm uncertain that's true. What's others experience with Passport 40's teak decks and leaks? Appreciate any help. Also, as a postscript I've taken scrupulous care of the teak with semco every year. Literally no bungs have eroded either. In other words, the teak still looks beautiful, which adds to my angst about removing it.
 

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Are you having moisture issues below?

Bob Perry is a member here, maybe send him a PM if he doesn't see this on his own..
 

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A 30 year old screwed down teak deck will inevitably have many of the screws 'sawn free' from the fiberglass due to thermal cycling ... and most of the 'thiokol' used to lay the teak strakes upon no longer sealing.

A DIYer with such a deck in high suspicion of leaks will usually drill small 'weep holes' from below the under deck ascertain the zones of moisture intrusion ... then remove only the sections of teak strakes, repair the core etc only in that zone, re-mill the OEM teak (thats still in good condition) and simply epoxy-laminate the teak back down ... plus cosmetic repair, etc.
Would cost a fortune for a yard to do this at $70+/hr per worker and thats why they simply do the WHOLE repair at $70+/hr per worker, including destruction of all the OEM teak overlay decking.

Im pretty envious of teak decks that are epoxy 'laminated' .... and have the shoulder bursitis to prove that an old well maintained teak deck 'can' be recored, restored and then 'laminated' back down.
 

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Frankly, I don't know how you can stand to let that boat get wet. I guess a glass case big enough to hold it would be prohibitively expensive. :D:cool:
 

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I put on about 6-8K± nMi per year.
Most of what you see in brightwork, and 'shine' is acrylic-urethane copolymer (HoneyTeak) and most of what you see applied was done 8-9 years ago. About 2 days per year 'maintenance' to keep it that way. The boat is an '83.

:)
 

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I put on about 6-8K± nMi per year.
Most of what you see in brightwork, and 'shine' is acrylic-urethane copolymer (HoneyTeak) and most of what you see applied was done 8-9 years ago. About 2 days per year 'maintenance' to keep it that way. The boat is an '83.

:)
:cool: What constitutes "annual maintenance"? A fresh coat?
 

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Every two years ... quick power-buffing with 3M Perfect-it.
Intervening years, scuff up with Scotch Brite pad (100 grit), and quick lay down thick 'flow-out' coat of 'clear' overcoat .... and 'remedy' of any lifting, etc. at scarfs, etc.
Once you get a high build up of 'clear' just power buff.
Otherwise, dutiful quick repair of nicks & dings, etc. ... as is needed for 'any' coating to prevent major repairs.

With Honey Teak, the colder the ambient the better the 'flow out'. ... but with HT the 'learning curve' is quite steep.

Like most 'coatings' the flatter you get it during the 'finishing' the longer it will last.
 
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