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Same colossal project of a boat I’ve posted about a few times. Sustained fire damage from blow-over from a neighboring boat. Fiberglass needs considerable recoating. The boat is at my dad’s shop and I have his auto mechanic (w/ some experience laying fiberglass) doing the work. Figuring it out and learning as we go.

What I can’t figure out is how the heck to deal with the cabin areas that had a patterned non-skid surface. It’s simply not an option to resort to non-skid paint and have half the cabin mismatched from the rest of the boat. So far my research has turned up that these patterned non-skid surfaces are only done by the manufacturers and not repeated after a boat leaves the factory. Any innovative sailors out there figure out a way to mold this pattern onto a deck? Any advice is much appreciated!
 

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You can make your own mold like posted above, or buy Flexmold Non-skid Pattern Mold | Non Skid Mold Patterns | Gibco Flex-Mold - they make pretty much every pattern used.

I've done both. The Flexmold is expensive for large areas, but they sell an inexpensive repair kit containing a 1'x1' mold.

If you need a large repair, then I would make a mold. If the need is smaller than a square foot, I would use the Flexmold.

Mark
 

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Using silicone molding compound, to pick up and replicate a pattern from non-skid and then apply it elsewhere, is not uncommon or hard. If you've ever seen "europavers", they use the same process (make a big silicone mold and press it into wet concrete) to make concrete walkways look like laid stone. Masonry suppliers and construction suppliers should have the stuff available in bigger cheaper sizes than the crafts stores do. And you may be able to find a masonry worker who is familiar with the process and willing to do it on your boat. Already having the skills could make the job easier.

But since you have to "tile" the area multiple times, and find a good original to take the pattern from, it can wind up being a better (cheaper, faster, prettier) job grinding down the remaining non-skid and simply applying new. Either by roller, or with an adhesive non-skid material. All depends on what you've got.
 
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