SailNet Community banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am planning to run lines back to the cockpit by using a mast plate with turning blocks under the bottom of the mast. By having the vertical force on the lines pushing on the mast rather than pulling on the cabin top, it reduces stress on the cabin top. I did this on my previous boat with success. However, 5 hours before signing the papers, I broke my foot and was unable to see the configuration of the mast and the deck (the mast is unavailable until later in March). I have been unable to find the bottom of the mast cross section dimensions in order to buy the correct plate plate If anyone has this information or knows where I can find detailed plans, I would appreciate it. I also need to know if there is enough space between the key and the edge of the mast to make this work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,113 Posts
it is a keel stepped mast. Are you planning to put a plate around the mast? It will still need to be fastened to the cabin. Sold my P28 so I can't help with the dimensions, but it is a great boat to sail.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
it is a keel stepped mast. Are you planning to put a plate around the mast? It will still need to be fastened to the cabin. Sold my P28 so I can't help with the dimensions, but it is a great boat to sail.
I was only in the cabin two or three times. If I remember correctly, on the boat I have (hull #78, 1960), the mast sits on a beam running across the boat and does not sit directly on the keel. As I understand it, the mast has a "key" that sits into a rectangular hole in the round wooden mast base which sits on the cabin. When the previous owner recored the boat, he put solid glass over the beam for added strength I plan to cut a hold in the mast base plate that allows the "key" to fit into the hole. I have only good things about the boat.
 

·
Senior Smart Aleck
Joined
·
2,152 Posts
If your Pearson was manufactured in 1960, you have a Pearson Triton, designed by Carl Alberg. The Pearson 28 first appeared in 1977 and was designed by William Shaw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,446 Posts
If your Pearson was manufactured in 1960, you have a Pearson Triton, designed by Carl Alberg. The Pearson 28 first appeared in 1977 and was designed by William Shaw.
Actually it was 1975 with deck changes in 1976 and keel changes in 1977 and all have a keel stepped mast.
The 28-2 was introduced in 1985 and has a deck stepped mast.

So which model does the OP refer?
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Barquito,

Thanks for the photos; they help out quite a bit. I know it is doable. I can get an idea about the "key" size and location from the photo that has a chisel and hammer.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top