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Hello--new to the forum--new to sailing--have a Pearson Renegade--think it was the 5th one built based on the plate I found in the parts--it is a shell--totally stripped out--with only the new bulkheads replaced. Stern well for an outboard--a long time project finally getting the attention it deserves. First--there was a Pearson Renegade web site--any idea where that went? Second--best source of interior/exterior picture--have everything in my garage--Cetol'd and Glossed and once it warms up (in the Northern Neck of Va)--would like to start putting together before bringing it to the yard for bottom paint and remasting. One look is worth a thousand pic--any Renegade owners in Northern VA/ Southern VA? Still have tons of questions (where did the bilge pump pump out to--did the head have a holding tank (there was a Konvert a Head in the Head so leads me to think it pumped out right through hull, etc etc)--any overall advice -- this really looks like a fun boat!

thanks!
 

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Wauquiez Gladiateur
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Hello--new to the forum--new to sailing--have a Pearson Renegade--think it was the 5th one built based on the plate I found in the parts--it is a shell--totally stripped out--with only the new bulkheads replaced. Stern well for an outboard--a long time project finally getting the attention it deserves. First--there was a Pearson Renegade web site--any idea where that went? Second--best source of interior/exterior picture--have everything in my garage--Cetol'd and Glossed and once it warms up (in the Northern Neck of Va)--would like to start putting together before bringing it to the yard for bottom paint and remasting. One look is worth a thousand pic--any Renegade owners in Northern VA/ Southern VA? Still have tons of questions (where did the bilge pump pump out to--did the head have a holding tank (there was a Konvert a Head in the Head so leads me to think it pumped out right through hull, etc etc)--any overall advice -- this really looks like a fun boat!

thanks!
The Pearson Renegade website is no more, but you may be able to find info on the wayback machine. I had hull 105 for 17 years, and can answer many questions and provide photos. These are great sailing, well balanced, very safe boats. The only weak links are the toerails (tend to leak, difficult to replace) and the gelcoat on the cabin top which is thin and tends to craze.
I put a bilge pump outlet on the starboard side through the lazarette, but it could go anywhere. we had a nominal holding tank under port v-berth, but totally too small. I would see if you can get a composting toilet to work. LEt me know if you have any questions.
 

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Welcome Mcarter! The Renegade was my "dream" boat for a couple of years, and during that time, I scoured the web for potential boats and read everything I could about it. Excellent choice on your part; you are truly a man of discerning taste. Traditional styling above the waterline, but a split underbody for more "modern" performance. Well done indeed. When I was looking, the pickings were slim; the choices were either in really crappy condition, or had been totally rebuilt and were waaaaay overpriced.

I think I know the website you are referring to; it seems to have disappeared a few years ago. I don't know the story as to why it went into the great 404 land beyond, but I can say that before it disappeared, it seemed to me that it hadn't been updated or actively managed for awhile. There is still this page on the general Pearson website:


There's also this site, which isn't specific to the Renegade, but may give you ways to contact other Renegade owners:


And sailboatowners.com has a Pearson owners forum section. You can probably pick up some insight there too.


There are lots of images of the Renegade interior on line which should give you a good idea as to where things go. However, if you have a stripped hull, this is your opportunity to make the boat what you want, and not be beholden to a 60 year old design. For example, you may want more battery storage than Mr. Tripp originally specced. And if you really have hull #5 from 1967, it's possible the head was piped directly overboard without a holding tank. Again, if you have a blank slate, don't feel obligated to put the boat back into "original" condition. Any boat can be improved.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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I will start by saying I have always thought of the Renegade as one of those unrecognized and forgotten gems of the era. To me this was one of Bill Shaw's best designs during the period and is one of my favorite 27 footers of the era. I read the prior posts and looked at a couple of the links above and would like to comment on a few things and provide a little bit of clean-up.
1) The Renegade was designed by Bill Shaw and not Bill Tripp.
2) Several articles mention that the Renegade was a CCA design. It may have raced under the CCA and was designed in the CCA era, but the boat appears to have been optimized for the MORC rule of the day, which produced much more well rounded designs than the CCA. Bill Shaw was active in the founding of the MORC and in developing the MORC rule. He came to national fame through his work on the MORC rule and remained a proponent through much of his early career. The more proportionately longer water line length, the vertical and proportionately wide transom, more powerful hull sections, and the amount of headroom provided were hallmarks of the MORC rule. (The waterline length, hull sections, and transom would have hurt the boat's rating under CCA.)
3) You can't just design your own interior and place things wherever you want to functionally. Any new layout needs to be engineered to maintain the weight distribution required to keep the boat sitting on her lines, and .to provide the structural reinforcing needed for the rig loads and attachment points.

To explain, it is not always obvious that the interior design of a boat was designed with specific weight distributions in mind. While in reality, the designer somewhat back engineers this, meaning that they do a table of weights for the boat that lists the weight of each fixed object and the location fore and aft and side to side of the centerline of the boat. The net result of those calculations will provide the overall weight of all of the fixed items on the boat, and center of gravity fore and aft and side to side. The overall weight of the fixed items is subtracted from the design displacement of the boat and the difference is used to determine the weight of the ballast. The placement of the ballast is determined to place the center of gravity of the ballast so it brings the center of gravity of the entire boat into line with the center of buoyancy. Items are moved side to side to keep the boat from listing. The issue of balance is much more critical on small boats than bigger boats which are more tolerant of moving moderate weights around the boat.

If the intent is to design a completely different interior then you would need to essentially back engineer the original design, calculating the weight and weight distribution of the designed interior to locate the center of gravity of the boat as designed (You can skip the hull, deck, rig and ballast if you are not altering those items), and then calculate the weights and locations of all of the items in the new design to try to end up close to your calculation of the original weight and center of gravity.

Similarly boats of this era had very little internal framing. What little internal framing that they had existed in the form of bulkheads and knees. Often the structure that served as shroud attachment points were disguised as a shelf support or the shelf itself, or might simply be a locker or head bulkhead. Hull stiffeners were often bunk flats and shelves. If you take glassed in elements out of the boat, then alternate means of reinforcement need to be developed and engineered for the loads.

Jeff
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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In my defense, I note that they are both "Bill".
In your defense one of the articles made same attribution to the wrong Bill. Also the Bills knew each other and the hull form of the Renegade was closer to one of Tripp's designs than Shaw's later work.
Jeff
 

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Wauquiez Gladiateur
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Some of my favorite things about this boat include the size of the bunks. Wide and long. I have a bigger boat now and miss those bunks! Also the cockpit drains are directed to heavy duty fiberglass tubes that extend above the water line. No inaccessible thru-hull valves. Water from the side decks goes to a drain that scuppers internally below water level; very clean, safe and no ponding. Lots of lazarette storage (both sides of cockpit). Negative: outboard motor can cavitate in heavy seas, but then you should probably be sailing anyway. The boat in my signature was our Renegade.
 

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Some of my favorite things about this boat include the size of the bunks. Wide and long. I have a bigger boat now and miss those bunks! Also the cockpit drains are directed to heavy duty fiberglass tubes that extend above the water line. No inaccessible thru-hull valves. Water from the side decks goes to a drain that scuppers internally below water level; very clean, safe and no ponding. Lots of lazarette storage (both sides of cockpit). Negative: outboard motor can cavitate in heavy seas, but then you should probably be sailing anyway. The boat in my signature was our Renegade.
The one I looked at years ago (for very short money) in Maine had a BMW diesel in it. Did they make a model with an outboard well? As with the Ariel, or the Commander, as I recall, the outboard well was an option. One thing to look carefully at is your mast compression post. I have no issues with deck stepped masts, but an Ariel I looked at once had the split in the doorway leading to the vee "hidden". The piece of oak was cracked through, and only a virtually imperceptible deformation - I won't even call it a depression - was visible in the deck when the mast wasn't stepped. It had been cleaned, caulked and painted. The mast step is in the middle of the white oak doorway header and the compression is taken across the header by the sides of the doorframe. But I can't remember if it's the same with the Renegade.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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The one I looked at years ago (for very short money) in Maine had a BMW diesel in it. Did they make a model with an outboard well? As with the Ariel, or the Commander, as I recall, the outboard well was an option. One thing to look carefully at is your mast compression post. I have no issues with deck stepped masts, but an Ariel I looked at once had the split in the doorway leading to the vee "hidden". The piece of oak was cracked through, and only a virtually imperceptible deformation - I won't even call it a depression - was visible in the deck when the mast wasn't stepped. It had been cleaned, caulked and painted. The mast step is in the middle of the white oak doorway header and the compression is taken across the header by the sides of the doorframe. But I can't remember if it's the same with the Renegade.
That is good advice. Looking at the drawings it appears that there is a bulkhead on the centerline below the mast and I assume there is a header in the top of that bulkhead. All of that structure will need to get added back.

The Renegade either came with an optional Atomic 4 or an outboard well standard.

Jeff
 
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