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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All
I own a Pearson Vanguard (1965) dinette model which I recently bought in Harpswell, Me. I sail her out of South Portland, Me. I am familiar with these boats however I am looking to connect with other Vanguard owners to share ideas, experiences and knowledge about these classic seaworthy boats. I came across the Pearson Vanguard Homepage but it hasn't been updating in 10+ years.One thing in particular I'm trying to figure out is the best way to mount a reefing system on the original wooden boom. She's all set up with slab reefing on the main but the hardware was never installed on the spars. Thanks for your time - Ben Welch
 

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Just screw the hardware to the boom with wood screws. Assume the boom is hollow so 1" #10 screws should work fine.

Have always thought the Vanguard was the best looking of the old Pearson's. Searched for one when I was looking to get back into sailing but couldn't find one on the Left coast. Settled for a Pearson 35.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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Hello All
I own a Pearson Vanguard (1965) dinette model which I recently bought in Harpswell, Me. I sail her out of South Portland, Me. I am familiar with these boats however I am looking to connect with other Vanguard owners to share ideas, experiences and knowledge about these classic seaworthy boats. I came across the Pearson Vanguard Homepage but it hasn't been updating in 10+ years.One thing in particular I'm trying to figure out is the best way to mount a reefing system on the original wooden boom. She's all set up with slab reefing on the main but the hardware was never installed on the spars. Thanks for your time - Ben Welch
We owned a Pearson Vanguard hull number 155 for 5 years. She was destroyed in 1969 when she was driven ashore in a storm and lost her ballast keel. My comments are based on memories which are nearly 50 years old. But here goes....

My recollection is that the early Vanguards had a chromed bronze clew fitting on the aft end of the boom that included the crank for the outhaul and had a ring that could rotate as the boom was rotated to provide roller reefing. That ring has bails for the topping lift and mainsheet. The bronze version of this fitting also had bails on either side of the ring. The later boats had a Marinium Fitting (aluminum alloy) and I don't believe that the Marinium version has the side bails.

At the other end of the boom, the gooseneck has a bail facing downward for the downhaul, which had a block with shackle in that bail that was part of a tackle for the downhaul.

If I wanted to rig clew lines for slab reefing, here is what I would do. If I had the early bronze clew fitting I would shackle a single swivel bullet block on each side of the boom on the side bails of the ring fitting. If I had the Marinium version without the side bails, I would install a larger shackle on the bail for the topping lift and add a single block on either side of the topping lift.

At the forward end of the boom, I would fix the boom so it can't slide and so that I could eliminate the downhaul tackle and would install two single swivel blocks where the downhaul had attached.

Then I would put a double block on the downhaul tackle lower attachment point or install a bail on the deck inline with the pivot of the gooseneck and that somehow is tied back to the galvanized steel mast step beam, and attach the double block there. I would add a double rope clutch (Spinlock) on the deck aft of the mast and a small winch on the deck aft of that.

Starting from the winch each reef line would run through its own rope clutch, then through one side of the double block at the base of the mast, to one of the single blocks attached to the downhaul bail, then aft to one of the single blocks at the clew end of the boom, then up to the reef cringle and then end by being tied tightly around the boom essentially vertically below but ideally slightly aft of the position of the reef cringle on the sail when it is hoisted. If you do not have a loose-footed mainsail, to wrap the reef line around the boom, it would need to be installed by sliding it between the foot bolt rope and the track, and between the correct pair of slides.

You will need to add reef horns at the tack fitting as well. If you want to get a little fancy you can simply add a line that ties at the tack fitting and runs through the reef tack cringle, and then back to a cleat on the mast. This is faster and more reliable than using horn fittings.

I would check that the lines did not chafe the finish on the boom and if it did, I would add plastic, aluminum or or stainless chafe strips on the sides of the boom where the reef lines are likely to chafe the boom.

Jeff
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys for the ideas. A person 35 would certainly take the Vanguard in a race. I believe the boom is solid. It's laid up with individual pieces rather than one solid piece of spruce. However My main concern is installing hardware , i.e. Screws into the wood which would weaken the boom. I saw someone who had glue wood blocks onto the boom and then screwed the cheek blocks to those pads. Jeff sorry to hear about your Vanguard a concern for all of us. Your memory of the boom and fittings is right on. I need to draw out your idea to see it. Another Idea I had was to screw a genoa track onto the wood boom with cheek block cars leading to a cleat/s forward.
 

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Yes, the boom is hollow. Normally when you build a hollow wooden spar, you install solid blocking at any point where you intend to thru-bolt something to the spar. Otherwise you would use wood screws to fasten to the spar if the loads are not too great. In this case, I would be hesitant to use wood screws for the turning block.

One thing that I did not say above is that the blocks on the bails at the end of the boom should probably have a becket so that you can take some shockchord from the becket to the topping lift to hold them up so that they don't flop around.

This quick sketch might help you visualize what I was suggesting above.

<a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/40188220055/in/dateposted-public/" title="Vanguard Reefing_001"><img src="https://farm1.staticflickr.com/803/40188220055_0b26ff7e12_n.jpg" width="233" height="320" alt="Vanguard Reefing_001"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Interestingly, the boom was purposely made of wood because a wood boom was heavier than an aluminum boom and so it was thought that it would be less likely to lift up during a jibe and take out the backstay. That was how it was in the days before boom vangs were common.
 
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