SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
is Awesome!
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everybody!

Some of you will remember one of my early threads, in which I posed the question on using the boom to crane a lightweight dirtbike on and off.

well for various reasons it appeared that said idea was not quite as sound as I thought it was. But...

Yesterday I found a solution!!!!

Let me introduce the FX...

The way is was explained to me is that if you imagine a continuum with an enduro bike at one end and a mountain bike at the other, then the FX fits somewhere in the middle.

125cc (bigger models in pipeline)
57kg (125.4lb)
125mpg

Now at 125lb you could lift the bike on and off without a crane, you could even lift the bike (with care) onto a tender and presto you have transport when you arrive at the beach!

I have just reserved one of these bikes!
I think they are INSPIRED!

And yes they have already thought about the sea air/corrosion issue!
And they have a 'Marine' version with extra corrosion resistance and fully encapsulated electrics!!!

And at just $3'999 (((Brand new))) they are a bargain!
Here is the website for further details:

FX Bikes Mountain Moto World’s Lightest Motorcycles 125lb 125cc 125mpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
656 Posts
Wow, that's interesting. I had expected that you would eventually settle on a motorized bicycle but you were more creative than that. What size tender will you need to haul something like that?
 

·
is Awesome!
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Wow, that's interesting. I had expected that you would eventually settle on a motorized bicycle but you were more creative than that. What size tender will you need to haul something like that?
That's what I had thought I would end up with too, I found this website yesterday quite by accident, but I am so glad that I did!

I think a certain amount of trial and error on hardstanding will be required, but just off the top of my head I think something like an Avon 310 would be be enough.

At 57kg thats about the weight of an average sized... woman, so from a position of weight in the tender perhaps something even smaller could be used.

But care would need to be taken to protect the tender from any sharp points on the bike. I will post another thread when the bike arrives and then can post real world findings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,475 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,446 Posts
Also, is the "marine" version equipped for carring stuff? Ideally some of that wheel travel would be reduced and collapsible compartments and a load carrying platform provided. Show us a picture with the cycle in the dinghy.
John
 

·
is Awesome!
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
No lights- how do you plan to license it for the road?
I don't know what the score is with road reg in the states, but to register a bike in the uk is fairly straight forward process.

You can get a 'daylight only' MOT (MOT = annual road safety check) which allow you to use the bike on the road only in daylight hours with no lights at all as long as you have a horn and a reflector on the back.

To get a full MOT for use day or night you need a horn, dipping headlight and stop/tail light on the back (but still do not require indicators) horn/lights (as described) is a fairly simple DIY job.

There are lots of aftermarket (universal fit) parts designed specifically for the purpose of converting off road bikes for dual use.

Things like this:

and this


Although light, it's still a pretty big package.

I like something like a di biasi better:
I have seen the DiBlasi before and whilst it has some advantages of being smaller/folding etc it is strictly a road going only and I really like the idea that the FX can go offroad too.

Similar to DiBlasi is this cool little electric thing I found that might be of interest



YikeBike - The world's first super light folding electric bike. | Urban Freedom
10kg only for the Carbon fibre version!
Fully electric and that looks like a great little tool, but for me the winner is still the FX because it will happily go offroad too.
 

·
is Awesome!
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Also, is the "marine" version equipped for carring stuff? Ideally some of that wheel travel would be reduced and collapsible compartments and a load carrying platform provided
Hadn't thought of that, but I would think it would be relatively easy to add a simple carrying rack above the rear mudgaurd just like you can fit to a regular dirtbike like this:

And use some good old bungee cord...
Beyond personal transport, for food shopping etc I guess a rucksack would be the way forwards.

Show us a picture with the cycle in the dinghy
As soon as mine is delivered I'll post a new thread showing my real world findings :)
 

·
is Awesome!
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Ideally some of that wheel travel would be reduced
You really need that level of suspension travel to be useable offroad.
But the idea or collapsable compartment is a great idea though.
Something that unfolds above the rear mudgaurd for carrying stuff would be great idea, kind of like a folding basket or something similar for when being used for carrying stuff.
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,288 Posts

The way is was explained to me is that if you imagine a continuum with an enduro bike at one end and a mountain bike at the other, then the FX fits somewhere in the middle.
What a sweetie. It reminds me a lot of a trials bike. A 125 is plenty big enough to keep up on the highway but I'd change those knobbie tires for something a little smoother for road use - learned THAT from hard (pavement hard) experience. :)

You'd definitely have to have a thickly padded carry bag or something if you wanted to put it in an inflatable - look at those footpegs :eek:
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
76 Posts
If/when I ever get a yacht bike, I would have something more like this in mind...

Electric or manual to be more versatile. And it folds up as well!

 

·
is Awesome!
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
No lights- how do you plan to license it for the road?
Also, according to the manufacturer's website; there is going to release a full dual sport version with lights and indicators at some point in the near future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
I wouldn't go with that FWIW. Looks like a lightweight play bike, not good for transporting goods, no passenger possible. Gimmicks are great, but for a tender to a boat, I'd go reliable, well known and predicatable. Especially if travelling out of the country. Few things appeal to me less than the idea of arguing why a border guard should understand that my piece of paper makes a not originally road legal bike road legal in a language I don't speak well.

CT110 or Yamaha 125 would be my choice. or a light small 250 if you can afford the space/weight. Something with an actual dealer network, common parts and known reliably. If you really want to go lighter still, a 50CC 2 stroke scooter upgraded to 70CC scooter would work well as well. That FX strikes me as the worst of both worlds; The motorcycle equivalent to a jetski. I once upon a time considered a similar bike as a cool alternative, I thought, a GASGAS with a hotted up WR250F engine in it.
I am very grateful I didn't. Expensive and frequent servicing, constant demand for parts and hard to find. As a on boat motorbike I'd think toughness and reliability would be priorities.
I have a WR250R insetad, which shares little in common enginewise, tough, reasonably light, 42, 000 km valve service intervals(vs 300, not a typo, for the GasGas).


Something that is commonly known and predictable and tough would be better in my books.

EDIT: This is a rider I met along the road, I think he's in Albania in the picture. If he can ride this all over the world, you can use it as a tender reliably I think. Fuel injected, reliable, used as delivery bikes worldwide.
EDIT2; BL, I wouldn't want one of those on my boat! Can't take it on the road around here, and could get you in a lot of hot water just about anywhere.



$5 a day, dirt roads RTW on a 125cc Yamaha YBR - ADVrider
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,288 Posts
I wouldn't go with that FWIW. Looks like a lightweight play bike, not good for transporting goods, no passenger possible. Gimmicks are great, but for a tender to a boat, I'd go reliable, well known and predicatable. Especially if travelling out of the country. Few things appeal to me less than the idea of arguing why a border guard should understand that my piece of paper makes a not originally road legal bike road legal in a language I don't speak well.

CT110 or Yamaha 125 would be my choice. or a light small 250 if you can afford the space/weight. Something with an actual dealer network, common parts and known reliably. If you really want to go lighter still, a 50CC 2 stroke scooter upgraded to 70CC scooter would work well as well. That FX strikes me as the worst of both worlds; The motorcycle equivalent to a jetski. I once upon a time considered a similar bike as a cool alternative, I thought, a GASGAS with a hotted up WR250F engine in it.
I am very grateful I didn't. Expensive and frequent servicing, constant demand for parts and hard to find. As a on boat motorbike I'd think toughness and reliability would be priorities.
I have a WR250R insetad, which shares little in common enginewise, tough, reasonably light, 42, 000 km valve service intervals(vs 300, not a typo, for the GasGas).


Something that is commonly known and predictable and tough would be better in my books.

EDIT: This is a rider I met along the road, I think he's in Albania in the picture. If he can ride this all over the world, you can use it as a tender reliably I think. Fuel injected, reliable, used as delivery bikes worldwide.
EDIT2; BL, I wouldn't want one of those on my boat! Can't take it on the road around here, and could get you in a lot of hot water just about anywhere.



$5 a day, dirt roads RTW on a 125cc Yamaha YBR - ADVrider
Obviously those are more substantial bikes but do any of them weigh 125 Lbs and fit in a typical dinghy? A Honda Cub weighs almost twice that (200 Lbs)
 

·
is Awesome!
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
The WR250F is one of the best dirt-bikes available & is on my shopping list, but will be kept in my brother's garage to ride with him when back home.

But at it's heart, it is a competition bike capable of landing 30/40/50ft jumps etc and as such needs to be very tough, that toughness comes at a cost... weight! Ok, yes its less than 100kg (220lb) dry weight but that is too heavy to think about keeping on a small boat and you would need to crane it on and off etc

The little FX is light enough that it could be lifted onto the dockside without a crane, and (i think) put onto a tender safely, as long as some care was taken to protect the tender.

Any use abroad is going throw up problems regardless of what you were to take with you.
as long is the FX is properly road legal then it shouldn't (in theory) be a big problem.

Initially however it will be used as a commuter tool and play thing around the UK, if for example I decided to sail up to Scotland and explore some of the Scottish islands then I can do so on the little FX without needing to hire a car etc.

Here is a picture of the 'paps of Jura' for you all to enjoy, I lived on the west coast of Scotland in 2010 and fully intend to go back that way sooner or later and explore some of those waters in my little boat...
 

·
Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,688 Posts
What registration problems might you run into trying to use the roads in foreign countries with a motorized bike of any sort? It's difficult enough getting my bike to shore in a lot of places. You can easily pedal 20 miles or so with a regular bike to get supplies in a backpack. Anything farther than that and it's time to rent something with a motor ashore, get a taxi, a bus, or bum a ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,680 Posts
Hey, if you have to ride, you have to ride. I get that, I have a couple of bikes myself. Go for it, if you must.

However, I'm quite suspicious of dead lifting 125lbs into a dinghy. I'm trying to envision my wife, just lying on the dock, while I am sitting in the dinghy and trying to pick her up and put her aboard. Not quite the same, but that would be hard. Now I'm trying to imagine getting it off the sailboat at anchor. Not gunna happen for me.

Naturally, you're going to have to wait for pipes to cool down when you return as well.
 

·
is Awesome!
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
However, I'm quite suspicious of dead lifting 125lbs into a dinghy. I'm trying to envision my wife, just lying on the dock, while I am sitting in the dinghy and trying to pick her up and put her aboard. Not quite the same, but that would be hard. Now I'm trying to imagine getting it off the sailboat at anchor.
I think for the most part you could use the boom as a make shift crane, with a little ingenuity I think this could be done easily enough.

The only scenario I can see that it might be an issue is if the boat is tied up along side another. Then it may be a taxi ride instead.

Naturally, you're going to have to wait for pipes to cool down when you return as well.
Good point!
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top