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A friend of mine, who owns and skippers the boat that won major races repeatedly here in Maryland the past several years actually sprays his bottom with Teflon.
I would be very surprised if he actually sprays Teflon on his hull. I have never heard of anybody doing this. The only reason to do so would be to keep something from adhering to the bottom and if the boat is dry-sailed, that would not be an issue.

All the cleaning notes aside - Chose your bottom paint wisely, ablative paint is not conducive to scrubbing, all you get is cloudly water. Hard paint or no antifouling (on lifts) is the choice of speed masters.
I beg to differ. While I am no fan of ablative paints, a diver who knows what he's about will be able to clean an ablative bottom properly without scrubbing off too much paint. Yes, paint will come off during the cleaning, that's the nature of ablatives. But depending on how frequently you clean your bottom, you can absolutely get normal lifespan from an ablative paint. And let's be clear, ablatives are no better at retarding growth than any other type of anti fouling and certainly need cleaning just as often.
 

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Be surprized then, I've seen it, felt it, seen the spray pattern. The paired Governor's Cups on the mantle says it works.. Unless of course he was being secretive about his tips and tricks...

but sailor's never do that.

As to scrubbing ablative paint, not ever doing it again "a diver that knows what he is doing" is outside both my skill set and my budget.
 

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And let's be clear, ablatives are no better at retarding growth than any other type of anti fouling and certainly need cleaning just as often.<!-- / message --><!-- sig -->
That's very true fstbttms, but frequency of use has a direct relationship to how often one's ablative bottom needs scrubbing. The waterline around our slipmate's ablative bottom has taken on the appearance of a long green beard. The boat barely makes it out 4 times a season.

Our boat goes out at least three times a week and I've not had to clean the Micron Extra ablative bottom even once this season. I scubadive from the boat frequently as well.
 

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Some experiences in our area that may be relevant.

1. C&C25 with OMC saildrive and 2 blade fixed prop. Lower unit suffered corrosion and prop removed (replaced with outboard on transom for rest of summer) - lower unit left in place. Boat was significantly faster and the next year with repaired lower leg the boat used a folding prop and was significantly faster.

Redwing 30 with folding prop had terrible reverse. The next year he used fixed two blade but boat was significantly slower in races - more than the 6 second/mile adjustment to handicap.

2. Most PHRF associations adjust for 6 seconds/mile for fixed 2 blade over folding/feathering and most are either 3 or 6 seconds/mile for fixed 3 blade over fixed 2 blade.

3. My boat came with relatively smooth bottom and I opted for KL990 ablative paint first 4 seasons. For season 5 took hull down to gelcoat (not at all fun) and used VC Offshore hard racing paint. 0.3 knot faster when clean than the KL990 when clean. Will likely be similar with smooth vs rough bottom such as you have described.

4. As season progresses I notice that top speed under power drops off significantly when bottom is dirty. 0.2 - 0.3 knot. The "dirt" is usually just a minor amount of slime. My signal that a hull cleaning ois long overdue.

5. Bought new main sail and did not heel as much or reef as often. Translates into forward speed.

6. Replaced 100% jib. Travelled upwind .5knot faster and close to 10 degrees closer to the wind. Night and day difference in certain conditions.

7. C&C 25 mentioned above read up and then tuned the standing rigging. Boat pointed significantly higher than before. Noticeably enough so that the other boats soon followed suit.

8. Said C&C 25 also faired the keel one Spring while doing lots of the other stuff. Not sure of the effect of this alone but that year this boat went from an occasional winner to the boat which only lost 3 or 4 times all season.

It all adds up. If you ever race at all then the satisfaction of being ahead opf boats you could never before catch and the comments and looks from your sailing friends on other boats will make those few minutes each season worth the days of effort before the season starts.

... or you could be the boat every body complains about that takes it all too seriously.

Replace the prop, tune the rig - these are easy. Clean the bottom and you will if nothing else feel better about removing the ugly - but it is a lot of work and probbably the best of all the changes mentioned.

Good Luck

Mike
Full tilt 2
 

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chuckles, he is likely using a hard bottom paint like VC17 that has Teflon in it. Very common amongst racers, that is what I use.
If done properly it does feel very very slick.

Gary
 

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That's very true fstbttms, but frequency of use has a direct relationship to how often one's ablative bottom needs scrubbing. The waterline around our slipmate's ablative bottom has taken on the appearance of a long green beard. The boat barely makes it out 4 times a season.

Our boat goes out at least three times a week and I've not had to clean the Micron Extra ablative bottom even once this season. I scubadive from the boat frequently as well.
Notice I didn't say that ablative paint doesn't work. My point is that two boats living side by side, sailed with the same frequency, one painted with an ablative and the other with a modified epoxy will get similar performance from their respective anti foulings, whether that be good, bad or otherwise.
 

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The boats in our area (HHI) simply are not hauled, cleaned or painted frequently enough. These old-timers take their boats out every 2-3 months, and they CRAWL out to sea, and then the CRAWL back. When they see me in the water cleaning, or when they noticed that I'd had the bottom painted, they make comments to the effect that I'm am overzealous whipper-snapper. Meanwhile their hulls have got to be delaminating their bottoms off.
 

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Isn't it true that if you ancor where a fresh water river enters into a bay it will do a good job in cleaning your bottom ?
 

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The boats in our area (HHI) simply are not hauled, cleaned or painted frequently enough. These old-timers take their boats out every 2-3 months, and they CRAWL out to sea, and then the CRAWL back. When they see me in the water cleaning, or when they noticed that I'd had the bottom painted, they make comments to the effect that I'm am overzealous whipper-snapper. Meanwhile their hulls have got to be delaminating their bottoms off.
I was once told by a prospective client that he sailed faster with a coating of slime on his hull. :eek: :rolleyes:
 

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Isn't it true that if you ancor where a fresh water river enters into a bay it will do a good job in cleaning your bottom ?
Fresh or brackish water will do a pretty good job of killing whatever marine life is on your hull, thereby cleaning it. Takes awhile though.
 

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FB,
Isn't it amazing what you can learn from smart people? Here are a couple more "smart facts": Jack Daniels improves liver function, and sniffing glue improves memory.
 

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Only if your boat is normally kept in salt water. If you normally keep it in brackish or fresh water, it will do nothing, since that isn't going to kill stuff that normally lives in fresh/brackish water.
Fresh or brackish water will do a pretty good job of killing whatever marine life is on your hull, thereby cleaning it. Takes awhile though.
 

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Depends on the current of the river but I guess it be like a powerwasher.
 
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