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Señor Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

So, glutton for punishment that I am, I've started a winter project:



That's our aux -- a reliable Perkins 4.108M that (as you can tell from the staining) has developed a bit of an oil leak problem that is even high by Perkins standards. We also were getting a pretty noticeable exhaust stain on the stern, which didn't indicate good things...

After a lot of deliberation about whether or not to repower, I decided to bring this lump home to tear her down and see just how bad is is. I'll do a complete inspection, measuring the components against workshop manual specs, to see what all needs to be replaced.

At this point, I figure that at best I can get by with a top end job. If the cylinders liners show significant wear, then those'll need to be replaced.

The deal breakers will be if the block, crank, head or other major components need to be replaced.

Stay tuned...

What fun!
 

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Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

Hey Tom, I know how good you are at this type of stuff and that the rebuilt will be bettrr than new. Good luck my friend. Lake Macatawa just isn't the same since you left (3-4 years ago?), literally. I don't know if you could get into your old slip, we are down to record low water levels.
Have fun with your project.
 

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Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

I'll be watching this thread. Lots of pic's please.
I don't have a perkins but I know enough to know a diesel is a diesel even if you have that funny shaped knob on the end of your confusulator.
 

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Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

Pics and descriptions as you go Por! This should be a great learning thread!
 

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Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

Yes, picks please you never know when they could come in handy! That should keep you busy for a while. I rebuilt an MG motor, it never really ran much better afterwards, but hey it was built by Leyland and fired by Lucus, and I figured if I got it started I was ahead of the game! 500 miles was the longest between breakdowns! But I sure learned a lot, and had fun with that little thing!
 

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Señor Member
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

Yes, picks please you never know when they could come in handy! That should keep you busy for a while. I rebuilt an MG motor, it never really ran much better afterwards, but hey it was built by Leyland and fired by Lucus, and I figured if I got it started I was ahead of the game! 500 miles was the longest between breakdowns! But I sure learned a lot, and had fun with that little thing!
Paul -- You're gonna jinx me!!! There's way too many similarities :D

- The last engine I tore down and reassembled was from my Triumph GT6;
- The Perky is also of British heritage;

I'll be happy if I solve the (major) leak issues...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

Chapter 1: Getting the Beast Home

Not too many pics here, so please accept the descriptions and let your mind's eye paint the picture.

The first thing I did was to strip the engine of all the major external components. Since I'd pulled the transmission late last spring, the engine was pretty much bob-tailed anyway. I left the bellhousing on since the rear engine mounts are bolted to it (more on this design feature later in the story...) I pulled the heat exhanger/exhaust manifold, starter, raw water pump, alternator, and oil sump drain pump. I labeled each wire as it came off of the block.

I loosened the top nuts on the motor mounts; this wasn't as easy as it sounds. Besides the expected rust issues, the rear portside is masked by the bump-out in the bellhousing for the starter. I ran a chain fall down from a pair of 2x4's across the companionway opening and put some tension on the motor to stabilize it and unbolted the motor mount bracket from the bell housing. Once that was free, lifted the engine a couple of inches just so I could get a wrench on the motor mount nut. Anyway, long story short -- got all the motor mounts loose.

The next focus was prepping for transport and offload back here at home. I taped over all of the openings from the parts I'd already pulled. Here in the garage, I constructed the cradle in the shot above from 2x3, 2x4 and 4x4's. I also built a knock-down cross-beam that would be large enough to get a trailer under. I used 4x4's for the uprights and the crossbeam; everything else is 2x4's. Here's a look at that set up.



After that it was just a simple matter of getting the crane scheduled, renting a U-Haul motorcycle trailer, and getting it done.

After I dropped the dodger, frame and boom gallows, I took an extra hour to protect the companionway.



The crane showed up on time (0900), and the crane operator and I did a quick walk through. Since it was just him, I had to be up in the cockpit. Being somewhat cautious, I decided to suspend the chainfall from the crane hook so I could take it real slow if need be. I used the chainfall for the first six inches or so, then gave hand signals to the crane operator. All in all she came out real easy. By 0930, I was bolting her down in the cradle on the trailer.

After an uneventful trip home, I got her off the trailer. At that point I had to start disassembly in order to get it ready to pop on the engine stand. I had to pull the bell housing, damper plate, flywheel and rear end plate. At that point, the engine stand yoke will (just) line up with bolt holes in the block. There's also (barely) enough room to remove the rear main seal housing.

The only mishap was that one of the damper plate bolts snapped off below the surface of the flywheel. That's gonna be a treat to fix...

Next chapter: The Tear Down
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

Hey Tom, I know how good you are at this type of stuff and that the rebuilt will be bettrr than new. Good luck my friend. Lake Macatawa just isn't the same since you left (3-4 years ago?), literally. I don't know if you could get into your old slip, we are down to record low water levels.
Have fun with your project.
Tim,

Thanks for the vote of confidence! Hopefully it's warranted ;)

I've seen the dismal water level reports -- I think I'd have been stranded there at Yacht Basin. Hopefully, the levels will improve for you guys. Of course, that'll need a LOT of snow this winter :D
 

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Tartan 27' owner
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Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

Glutton for punishment? Maybe, but I have a feeling that you are going to do what it takes, no matter what. Besides, you've got all winter to work on it. We'll all be watching and enjoying your reports.

Those of you who love(d) and owned British sports cars should enjoy this: Lucas - Prince of Darkness - Lucas Electrical Humor Jokes
Apologies if you have seen it before.
 

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Nice work so far. I hope it turns out better than mine did...after pulling the W50 I decided it just wasn't worth the time or money to do anymore. Fortunately it sounds like your engine is pretty healthy and worth a overhaul. good luck!
 

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Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

Some people will simply do anything to save a few thousand bucks.
 

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Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

So, glutton for punishment that I am, I've started a winter project:



That's our aux -- a reliable Perkins 4.108M that (as you can tell from the staining) has developed a bit of an oil leak problem that is even high by Perkins standards. We also were getting a pretty noticeable exhaust stain on the stern, which didn't indicate good things...

After a lot of deliberation about whether or not to repower, I decided to bring this lump home to tear her down and see just how bad is is. I'll do a complete inspection, measuring the components against workshop manual specs, to see what all needs to be replaced.

At this point, I figure that at best I can get by with a top end job. If the cylinders liners show significant wear, then those'll need to be replaced.

The deal breakers will be if the block, crank, head or other major components need to be replaced.

Stay tuned...

What fun!
Your problem is the color. REAL diesel engines are supposed to be grey. Paint it grey and it will start running again.

HEHE!

Sounds like a fun project. Can't wait to see it.

Brian
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

Your problem is the color. REAL diesel engines are supposed to be grey. Paint it grey and it will start running again.

HEHE!

Sounds like a fun project. Can't wait to see it.

Brian
But Brian, I thought that the accepted wisdom is that blue makes it go fast? ;)
 

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Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

But Brian, I thought that the accepted wisdom is that blue makes it go fast? ;)
A blue STRIPE under the rub rail makes it go fast. Not the color of the engine. How silly. You can purchase your blue stripes directly through Catalina Yachts. Let me know if you need the number.

Brian
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

Perkins 4.108M: The Teardown

Disclaimer: Not too many pics here -- greasy, grimy hands and digital cameras are a bad combo.

I took my time disassembling the engine, giving all of the parts a first-pass cleaning as they came off to get the majority of the grime off. I kind of used a wide variety of cleaners, together with brass, stainless and regular tooth brushes. Spray Nine did a god job on light dirt. Purple Power was a little better, but plain old mineral spirits was probably the most effective and gives the best bang for the buck. For cleaning non-threaded fastener openings, I bought a cheap gun cleaning set from Wal-Mart; the bore brushes included work well for holes up to 3/8". For the larger holes I laid on a set of pipe cleaning brushes from the plumbing section of Lowes. For the nooks and crannies I broke out the dental tools.

I hit all threaded openings (and fasteners that were still in good shape) with thread chasers.





Each assembly went into its own ziplock bag, complete with fasteners. Those assemblies that were too big for bags were wrapped in packing stretch film. I gave all the iron parts a quick wipe down with ATF or WD-40 first to keep rust at bay until the engine goes back together.



Getting the cylinder head off was a bit of a struggle. I had to use some wooden door shims between the block and the head to get them to come apart. Once the head was off, I saw why. Several of the studs had developed a decent layer of rust, which kind of jammed things up.





All in all, I only had to hit a half-dozen or so fasteners with heat to get them out. The cheapo propane torch definitely came in handy. A couple put up real fights, but they eventually came loose. Repeated applications of PB Blaster, heat, and perseverance eventually won the day.

Several of the head studs are getting a little pitted...



Some of the fasteners are just not worth saving. Here's what most of the bell housing studs looked like. It'll be much better/easier to just replace them.



Getting gasket residue off is time consuming. For small parts that came off the block, I chucked a brass brush into the drill press and let the machine do the hard work. For the bigger parts, it was a combination of tools: a putty knife I put a chisel point on; utility knife blades; safety razor blades; and an old putty knife blade I had sharpened like a card scraper.

Clean mating surfaces:



The broken damper plate bolt eventually came out. Initially I drilled a hole for the easy out only deep enough to get the threads to bite, then let it soak with PBB. No joy... Heat, then more PBB and soak a couple of days; still no joy. Eventually I drilled completely through the length of the bolt so that the torch flame would get heat to the whole part -- JOY!



Next Chapter: Measurements
 

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Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

Nice work, and well-written, porf. Hopefully this will demystify the process for folks who think the internal combustion spinnaker is a box of black magic.
+1 on PBB- it's like Frank's Red Hot around stately jones manor.
 

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Re: This Ought to Keep Me Busy...

Great post, Porfin.
 
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