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sloblowboat
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok i have a pearson 26 that i am going to run up the icw in south texas! the boat is in great cond sails rigging ect ! but it has a brand new coleman outboard on it! is that a safe motor to trust on this trip? it seems that everything i find is 50/50 on what folks are saying about it! i am going to need it on the icw going under the bridges ect they wont let you sail ! i am willing to buy a new motor but if i can save money i will. the trip will be about 200mile's all i need is another i told you so from the wife! thanks for any info that you have!
 

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what coleman? what engine does it use?...they obviously rebadge someone elses motor so find what motor they are using and maybe buy some common spares

but being new and a 200 mile trip I think you are fine and obviously you have your sails...
 

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it seem's to be a china made motor ? 5 hp
From what I've read it is indeed made in China. The reviews are very mixed with the biggest complaint being they won't start. Parts will be difficult if not impossible to get.

The other problem I see is that I think your under powered at only 5 Hp. The Texas portion of the ICW does not look very conducive to much sailing so it looks like you'll be a motor boat with auxiliary sails.

If your looking to avoid "I told you so" from your wife I would take this as an opportunity to upgrade to a name brand more powerful motor. Some Pearson 26 are running 15 Hps but none on Yachtworld has anything less than. 9.8 Hp.
 

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dude 15 on a 26 footer is way overkill....

youd be served well by a merc 5, johnson 6 2 stroke or similar to keep it simple or whatever but 15 just shows how little some owners know about correct size for their boat and how easily they are pushed into buying that size for their boat 15 is real heavy and awkward for a small 26 footer...

a yammie 8 longshaft would be another max size engine I would look at...

if there is anyway though you can find more info or parts for your current engine that would be good if not then maybe keep it as a spare or sell it for cheap and put it towards a more reliable and parts available engine like the evinrude,johnson, mrecs, hondas, out there

good luck btw
 

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Extra long shaft tohatsu 9.8 fits the boat really well. Makes 6 kts with a little throttle to spare. If you are planning to do a lot of motoring I wouldn't go too much less than the 9.9. Running WOT all the time isn't always appreciated by the engine.
 

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dude 15 on a 26 footer is way overkill....

youd be served well by a merc 5, johnson 6 2 stroke or similar to keep it simple or whatever but 15 just shows how little some owners know about correct size for their boat and how easily they are pushed into buying that size for their boat 15 is real heavy and awkward for a small 26 footer...

a yammie 8 longshaft would be another max size engine I would look at...

if there is anyway though you can find more info or parts for your current engine that would be good if not then maybe keep it as a spare or sell it for cheap and put it towards a more reliable and parts available engine like the evinrude,johnson, mrecs, hondas, out there

good luck btw
I do agree that 15 is overkill. Six boats are listed on Yachtworld. Five of them have 9.8 or 9.9 Hp. And one has a 15 Hp. My guess is that they all can't be wrong.
 

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its not their wrong...per se its just impractical...you gain nothing really except worse boat handling under sail

there is a big weight difference between a 15hp and a 5hp especially if the 15 is 4 stroke

I had a merc 5hp 2 stroke on a folkboat the plastci one around 5klb displacement

I never felt underpowered even dealing with the usual ebbs and floods in san francisco bay

it was light,on a bracket and not way out there on the stern

on small boats its better to be agile, light and compact...having a 15hp to me is ludicrous

9.8 border line

are they fourstrokes? they probably weigh 100lbs

thats a lot! on a boat like a pearson 26

fwiw 2 strokes do better at just under wot, under load especially if they are non sail oriented engines...

a good prop change for more torque goes a long way in making an outboard better suited fro heavy displacement applications

its what Ill be doing on my johnson 15hp 2 stroke
 

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Well back to the original issue, the Coleman should be OK for the trip. I would see if perhaps you can find a backup (beg borrow or steal just for the trip) motor. If the motor is new I think you are safe for the trip but you will want to take it out for a pretty good shakedown and break in run. If it seems to be good for that time I am sure you will be OK. Likely the issues will come up in the future when you can not find parts. But if the motor is new you should have a few years till then. I would not pick it but since you have it, run with it.

The thing with most of these Chinese motors are that they are often direct copies of the popular ones. So it is likely a copy of the Tohatsu. Will it last as long, most likely no, but since the boat has it just use it.
 

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I don't know anything about Coleman outboards, but thought I'd chime in just because I, too, sail a Pearson 26. Mine has a mid-80's 8hp Johnson Sailmaster on it that I went through with a fine tooth comb ( rebuilt the entire bottom end, carb, water pump, and fuel pump). It runs great now, but to be honest I wouldn't want to go much smaller in terms of power. Like other posters have said, running the throttle wide open for long periods of time may not be in the motor's best interest, and it definitely won't be pleasant on your ears. Mine'll push the boat the boat at a good 6 or 7 knots wide open, but you save a LOT of gas going slower.

One thing to consider is to plan for the power you'll need if you're motoring in a strong wind. We got a very nasty surprise one day when I was at the mast hoisting the headsail. We were motoring at maybe 1/3 throttle with my wife at the tiller into a fairly strong wind (by my admittedly newbie standards... 15-20 knot gusts), when the wind blew the bow off track, and my wife couldn't keep it steered into the wind... mostly because I was too stupid to have left her with more power. The tiller almost knocked her over. She's tiny, but still... not a pleasant experience... but we survived and she still sails with me! :)

Personally, I wouldn't go less than 8hp.. but I don't know that much. Experienced sailors can get by with less, most likely... or even no motor. I'm not experienced. Right now, I wouldn't accept any less power, and would rather have a bit more.

Just my worthless $.02.

Best to ya,

Barry
 
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69' Coronado 25
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I have a Coronado 25 it displaces 4500 lbs. I have an 8 hp 2 stroke Yamaha (with a bad prop). I was out yesterday with 4 of us on board and 25 knts of wind with gusts at 35 to 40 and the 8 hp pushed us along at 5 to 6 knts head into the wind.
 
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sloblowboat
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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
thanks all the info is helpfull! but you said you said you have a pearson 26 do you use a lond shaft or longer ? what is your shaft length? i am looking at a few on ebay right now!
well i did not get the one i was bidding on it turns out he will not ship it ! so im still looking ! any one down here in or near texas has something to sell me that will work let me know!
 

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There is only one reliable outboard on the market today; Yamaha. It is also the most expensive. It is also the most stolen motor, at least 50 to one over any other, down here in the Caribbean. That is because it runs no matter how poor the maintenance by the West Indians is, or how much they abuse them.
I've had great luck with my Johnson, but that's all it is; luck. It was either the Johnson or a Mercury (definitely not a salt water engine), on a couple of package deals on end of season inflatables.
Honestly, I don't know anything about little sailboats with OB power, but my 15 pushes the dink very well and I can't see where a little extra hp can hurt in an emergency for you, but others with tons more experience in your size boat, are saying otherwise. Also, I believe you may need a 15 for electric start, if that is a feature you'd like.
I've done the ICW from the Mississippi to Apalachicola; it was a blast. Have a good trip.
 
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the yamaha enduro is the only sought after engine down here too...they are by far the best outboards out there today, and for quite some decades I might add.

BUT

the old omc motors of the 70, 80, early 90s can give them a run for their money

the new stuff today is quite crappy and complicated and cheaply made compared to the old stuff if weare talking abuse, reliabilty and overall performance

has much to do with epa and regulations and the switch to 4 stroke but also the uses of said engines...

the old honda 4 strokes or the suzukis will kick any new ones ass in my opinion if comparing old to new

having said that I used a merc 5hp 2 stroke mid 2000s for 2 years through all types of conditions including sailing into heavy chop in suisin and san francisco bay, heavy sailing out the gate, power sailing, and all sorts of abuse with not even a plug check

so you can get some good ones

if going for new really search out your options and dont just go for the best deal...

pay attention to what other sailors on your boats are using...but also check forums and reviews for common issues and failures on said engines...

we used and abused a yamaha 15hp enduro down here for our sailig school often carrying 8-10 kids on a fiberglass dink and that think would rattle and hum...but never fail

I only did an impeller change and lower unit oil swap as well as a carb kit tune and plug changes just cause not because it needed it

they are absolutely reliable and strong runners

for you in your situation I would avoid going 4 stroke for now...
 

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I had a Pearson 26 back in the 80s and had the same model Johnson 8 Sailmaster bblument has now. It replaced a 9.9 Mercury longshaft that got stolen. The Johnson Sailmaster has a 25 inch shaft versus the 20 on a longshaft. That plus the high-thrust prop makes a big difference in powering the P26 in any kind of wind and waves. The prop stays in the water much better than a 20 inch longshaft. Only issue was the engine would interfere with the rudder under high power, so had to tilt the engine back a bit from vertical to avoid this.
 

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sloblowboat
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
is the 20 inch shaft workable ? i can find that anywhere today! i though i had to have the 25 inch! i need to get this thing moved asap ! also how do you feel the p26 would handle off shore? i have been thinking just running it offshore to get it there. the boat seems to be very solid and sound but as you know things allway's pop up just when you dont need them to!
 

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I have a Coronado 25 it displaces 4500 lbs. I have an 8 hp 2 stroke Yamaha (with a bad prop). I was out yesterday with 4 of us on board and 25 knts of wind with gusts at 35 to 40 and the 8 hp pushed us along at 5 to 6 knts head into the wind.
We also had a Coronado 25 in & outside of San Francisco Bay. Started with a 6HP which was OK when it was calm, but struggled when it was rough, which was a lot of the time.

We replaced it with an Evinrude (OMC) 15 HP 2 stroke, which was the same size & weight as the 9.9HP, which probably would have been enough. Only on rare occasions did we run it wide open. A prop with one inch less pitch than the stock prop made a big difference in the amount of thrust.

Paul T
 

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Well

It really depends on how high the motor mount holds the powerhead above water

If your in big rolling seas motoring in some harbor the motor can get dunked rather deep

As far as power or the lack there of NONE of the older motors had displacement speed propellers there were all built for planing speed hulls



It looks like a lot but in fact when we recused the boat and rolled over a few tug wakes it was really close to submarine time



For better or worse the 4HP moved a 29' 8000# boat just fine at 4.5 knots as high thrust props are more like jetdrive lower units



While I would not be without the now restored A4 and very perfect propeller from a speed standpoint the common sense speed is about 5.5 knots due to the hulls tendency to stern squat

While it will reach 6.5 knots the fuel burn doubles and your feet get really wet as there is enough power to squat about 18" :)

Peoples preferences are funny Yamaha more or less rules around here in big outboards BECAUSE THEY CONTROL MANY HULL BUILDERS just as Mercury controls many others

On the other side Yamaha almost does not exist on the small stuff around here :) with Tohatsu outboard/Mercury/Mercury/Johnson (all the same) because they are very willing to sell lose motors

Many other brands will only sell them installed on a hull

The various oddball Chinese stuff always lacks stainless in key areas and tend to have short lives in saltwater
 

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is the 20 inch shaft workable ? i can find that anywhere today! i though i had to have the 25 inch! i need to get this thing moved asap ! also how do you feel the p26 would handle off shore? i have been thinking just running it offshore to get it there. the boat seems to be very solid and sound but as you know things allway's pop up just when you dont need them to!
Yes a 20 inch longshaft will work, but expect the prop to be out of the water A LOT if you get into some good sized waves and the boat starts pitching. I had my P26 in some bad weather over the 10 years I owned her, and the 25 inch Sailmaster was a big improvement in powering performance.
 
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