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Corsair 24
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depends on size of boat...if small usually off the side works great...just throw a hand out! jaaja
 
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I tie a line to my kid and kick her over the side to swim for it. I sail an arc passing by it pretty close dragging her up to it. Works every time and she thinks it's fun. Win Win.

It's not totally a singlehanded, but that's her only job, so it's pretty much singlehanded sailing.
 

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Stern - stay near the helm until you have a line on it then walk the line to the bow to make fast.
 
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Master Mariner
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I think it so much depends on the weather. Normally I'll lay her slightly to windward of the buoy a few feet aft of the bow and allow the boat to drift down on the mooring, giving me plenty of time to get ready and catch the pennant. One thing I do though, is have a very long (maybe 20 foot) pennant for picking up without stress and get secured to the mooring. Then, after the boat has swung (and the inevitable gust or wake has gone by), I can bring her to the proper length on the pennant or even a second one of the correct length. The idea is to give yourself plenty of time to get secured to your mooring.
 

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Living the dream
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I have an extension line I attach to the boat first fitted with a spring hook when picking up single handed. This spring hook end extends along one side to around midships. This arrangement gives me the time to pick up and attach the pennant that it takes for the boat to drift backwards half a boat length or so. Once the pennant is attached to my pickup line, I can repeat the process and pull the pennant in by hand.

Interestingly, I find it easier to pick up the mooring on the bigger boat than on my previous boat as the larger vessel responds to wind and wave action much more slowly than did the lighter vessel which in turn allows more time to grab the pennant.
 

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Wandering Aimlessly
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I drift down (unless wind/current is too strong) with the engine in neutral, and have boat hook and heavy gloves ready at the bow. In strong wind or current, I motor past, then drift back down, stern first.
 

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Bow or stern?
Big boat, or small?

Aft cockpit, or center cockpit?

Windy, or calm?

Daytime, or night? Foredeck light, or no?

Any current running, or still water?

A large bowsprit or other impediments to close-in visibility forward, or not?

Familiarity with the mooring gear/pendant, or will you find that out when you grab it?

Excessive freeboard/exaggerated sheer, or no?

Headsail furling creating excessive windage forward, or not?

Side decks littered with Kroozing Krap, or unimpeded allowing a quick and safe passage forward?

Cockpit cluttered with crap on 'de back or obstructed by a full cockpit enclosure, or clear and open?

Does the boat back down nicely, or is she unmanageable in reverse?

And, perhaps most important of all: Will others be watching, or not?

As always, IT DEPENDS...

:)

I rarely lie to moorings with my own boat. But when I do, with her twin furlers forward and excelent maneuverability in reverse, if there's any breeze it's almost always a no-brainer for me to back up and grab it from the cockpit... But if it's calm, then I might just grab it from the bow...
 

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I have a sugar scoop stern so i tie a ling line from a bow cleat and bring it aft. Then I back up to the mooring ball, thread it with my line and walk forward.

Single handed moorings are a bit perplexing when you start, but they really are quite easy :)
 
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One of None
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Bow - I motor up to the mooring, put the engine in neutral a short distance from the mooring, walk to the bow and use the boat hook to pick up the pendant.
How I've been doing it for years on the river with a very quick current. There are times the wind makes it near impossible, but 90% of the time I, like most of the YC members that have boats on moorings in the River here, get lots of practice. One learns the inertia of their boat and how long the walk from the helm takes. Sometimes the engine has to be loping in very low rpm just to keep the boat head to current
 

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Bombay Explorer 44
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I have a line with a spring gate carabiner which is led back to the cockpit outside everything.

Put the cockpit alongside the mooring ball reach over and clip the carabiner on the top loop.. None of this galloping up to the bow nonsense. If you have high topsides and have difficulty reaching the mooring ball use a short bit of broom handle taped to the carabiner and let it go.

Once you are attached it is easy to pull yourself up to the ball and thread your mooring lines through. [You do use two I hope.]
 

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One of None
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This often times makes it easy without the boat hook if the conditions are calm.
 

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HANUMAN
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This often times makes it easy without the boat hook if the conditions are calm.
I have a pick stick, even in adverse conditions it seems to work well.

Even in heavy air I motor up to the pick up stick, then walk forward and grab it.

I have a 4 ft lead from the pick up stick to the pendent, 20 ft pendents, and 25 ft of top chain. So, I have some room for error as long as I get the stick in my hand.

The current in my mooring field can run strong. Add some breeze to that and picking the mooring up from the cockpit can be difficult as the bow will fall off pretty quickly. It that happens I run the risk of the boat reversing itself or getting the long pendents wrapped around the rudder or keel. Then the struggle begins.

I suppose I could back up it it, but in a chop I think I might get wet. Then there is the struggle of getting the bow into the wind/current. But..I never tried it so I might just give it a whirl.'

Oh, then there is the inevitable wind against current situation.... Still easier than backing into a slip :)
 

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I like to sneak up on the starboard side of the average mooring although truth be told the port side would do as well. Despite rumors moorings cannot see equally well in every direction.
Moorings are like mongoose except generally speaking they will not jump onto your deck to attack you. Nevertheless they are sneaky demons, ready to bob and weave even when sitting still would work just fine. Moorings can be conquered, but you must buckle up, knuckle under, grit your teeth and put on your big boy pants. All said as Nelson said, sometimes you have to go right for it.
In gentle winds it is easy to get the average mooring by surprise if approaching from the leeward. It is imperative you don't allow the mooring to get your scent. Smelling humans on boats a mooring may run, in worst case scenarios they have been known to attack. Missing boat hooks, digits, limbs, spouses or mates are not unheard of.
When approached by the average boatman the mooring can turn from a passive bobbing ball to a mocking chimera, impossible to catch without a specially blessed barbed boat hook made of particularly expensive marine grade titanium.
Professionals or relatively competent seaman can capture or at least tame the average mooring ball ( on most occasions) by feigning indifference or adopting a scowling countenance.
All things considered it is little wonder why boat slips are so popular in more advanced sailing societies.
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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This is really simple.

Bow - I motor up to the mooring, put the engine in neutral a short distance from the mooring, walk to the bow and use the boat hook to pick up the pendant.
Pretty much. Although there are some things to bare in mind.

Is this your mooring that you can set up as you like? If so, a good pendant with a pick stick like that pictured by deniseO30 above is the answer. N.B. the fiberglass stick can shed splinters so either varnish it or wear gloves.

If it isn't your mooring you will of course want to be sure it is well set. It may or may not have a pendant. If it doesn't you can muscle the ball aboard with a boat hook or use any one of a number of patent hooks. I use one from Bosun's Supply: Stainless Steel Mooring Hook Kit 5" Clip | C0182-K120

I haven't had an issue running the boat up to windward toward the ball and wandering up to the bow to scoop up the stick, the pendant with a boat hook, or clipping the mooring hook at the end of a snubber.

Jon's list of questions are good to think through but none of them would cause me to do anything different than pick up on the bow. I might change my approach, but I still believe in a bow pickup, including single-handed (which happens a lot for me).
 

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One of None
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8,040 Posts
I just know,

I don't want ever

to wrap,

a mooring ball, float,

and lines

around my keel,

EVER again!

It so makes a

VERY BAD DAY!

I'm the only one,

it's happened to.



Picking up a mooring should flow like good poetry :) Not like the above
 

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The HandyDuck- The king of all Hooks looks like an option to have onboard.
 
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