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██▓▓▒▒░&
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"(But then, as must already be obvious, I ain't no expert!)"
It IS counter-intuitive, which is why it hasn't been widely known or considered until fairly recently, i.e .the last 5-10 years. Oxygen is corrosive, but other elements can be more corrosive. The same way that there is a relative scale for galvanic problems with metals.
IIRC oxygen, sulfur, and chlorine are the most common corrosive elements. Stainless isn't unique this way either--aluminum rots away in no time if you break the surface layer of very hard oxide that forms on it. And in the early aluminum hulls, before they got the alloy right, I'm told you could literally throw a penny (which was all copper back then) into the bilge, add a little salt water, and it would eat a hole through the hull because of galvanic problems. Pennies are now copper-clad zinc, and aluminum alloys used in hulls very different.
 

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Telstar 28
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992 Posts
Oxygen is required for the reaction that protects the stainless steel from corroding. Depriving it of oxygen leads to increased corrosion. This is why you shouldn't tape stainless steel rigging to protect the sails... since the turnbuckles can fail from crevice corrosion where the tape is.

Leave it alone if you're not going to drop the keel and inspect the keel bolts and then re-bed it properly. BTW, don't use 5200 on the keel-hull join.
 
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