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Whitewater to Seawater
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We are thinking of buying a trailable 19’ pocket sport cruiser to do short 1 or 2-night cruises on the US coastal shores and lakes. The boat is super lightweight, around 1,034lbs including her fully retractable 154lbs swing keel and should be easy to trailer and launch from any boat ramp. I see that there are quite a few National and State parks with boat ramps but it looks like few allow overnight stays for cars and trailers. I suppose there is also the option of launching from public boat ramps outside parks which may not have parking limitation but would leave the car more exposed to potential break-ins and theft. I understand that public ramps can be quite busy on week-ends (and I have seen some…) but we are semi-retired and quite flexible with our schedule so, we plan around busy times. We have owned 35’ and 40’ cruisers at marinas and were looking for a new and more exploratory way to sail around and discover new areas. It surely won’t be as comfortable as the big boats but we really like the idea of being able to beach the boat anywhere, sail up shallow waters and walk/camp to shore.

I am just curious to hear from anyone who has or is sailing around US waters in a similar manner and whether or not this plan makes sense. Anyone with advice from past experiences is also welcome to pitch in.
 

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Yes, I do this style of cruising. I really like it. I am mostly Ontario/Quebec/New York State based, but I also do south Florida.

It's a really good way to sail/explore/cruise.

I took a year off in 2018 when my daughter was born and hit up; several Eastern US States and Canadian Provinces.

It is a fantastic way to boat.

It works very well. We carry a tent (2; sleeping and kitchen) to increase confort/living space. We also use hotels from time to time.

Our boat is a Bay Hen 21 with camper top.
 

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Welcome aboard.

Feel free to hit the like button when you are just following the topic. It lets others know how many people are reading it, and you don’t have to write as much😀

Again welcome and what area do you sail in?
 

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I've considered during this with a Com-Pac Horizon Cat. A bit pricey and hard to find, but cavernous inside and super easy to rig with the hinged mast and single sail. Also a bit heavier, advertised at 2,500 lbs but I believe closer to 3,200 lbs. Comes with either a diesel inboard or outboard.

I think the Horizon Cat would be a great trailerable boat for camping.

One place that I always wanted to boat/camp from was Point Lookout State Park in St. Mary's County, MD. Aside from having a very nice boat ramp area there is also a campground on site. I have considered taking my West Wight Potter down there for a couple of days of sailing and camping.

I believe that there is a West Wight Potter group that sometimes overnights from one of the private ramps on the Bohemian River. The upper bay is suppose to be a great area for smaller, trailerable sailboats.

Jim
 

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Whitewater to Seawater
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Discussion Starter #5
We are looking at getting something light, fast and nimble. The Flow 19 is just over 1,000lbs and the trailer is 500lbs. She has a 0.3ft draft with the swing keel up, a large cockpit and wide transom and a pretty roomy cabin that can accommodate up to 4 to sleep on a pinch. She has no comfort except for decent bunks but is perfect I think for a couple who want to spend a night of two at the time on the boat. With her high freeboard, plumb bow and wide transom, she seam seaworthy and the deep cockpit offers quite a bit of protection from the elements.
 

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I've considered during this with a Com-Pac Horizon Cat. A bit pricey and hard to find, but cavernous inside and super easy to rig with the hinged mast and single sail. Also a bit heavier, advertised at 2,500 lbs but I believe closer to 3,200 lbs. Comes with either a diesel inboard or outboard.

I think the Horizon Cat would be a great trailerable boat for camping.

One place that I always wanted to boat/camp from was Point Lookout State Park in St. Mary's County, MD. Aside from having a very nice boat ramp area there is also a campground on site. I have considered taking my West Wight Potter down there for a couple of days of sailing and camping.

I believe that there is a West Wight Potter group that sometimes overnights from one of the private ramps on the Bohemian River. The upper bay is suppose to be a great area for smaller, trailerable sailboats.

Jim
There’s a nice Campground - Dennis Point Marina with launch ramp on Carthagenea Creek—— St Mary’s River close to there.

We’ve taken Haleakula and anchored in the Creek and dinghied to their home style restaurant and outrageous crab cakes.

There’s a fully restored beauty of a wooden Pongie/-Bugeye—oyster dredger in the creek just past Dennis Point.
 
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The dimensions look pretty similar to my Bay Hen which is a very easy boat to trailer. I can launch at gravel ramps with my 2wd mini van. Beach every night. I find it pretty easy to find places to beach.

I have a similar mast tabernacle set up, unstayed mast. Can be off the trailer into the water and rigged in 15 minutes if I trailer with the sail on.

My boat is 900 lbs, 21 feet, with a 9 inch draft with the board up. Interior living space is pretty good with the camper top up. My wife and daughter sleep in the cabin, son and I in the cockpit under the camper top. Camper top has bug screens for airflow. We generally do 2 week trips on her. As you noted, parking at marinas can add up. $15-20 day doesn't seem uncommon. We get sn annual pass at an area conservation area that gives us unlimited local launching for $40/year, that includes parking as well.

Some pics.
 

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I have a Cal 29 and a 21 ft Dovekie. I found that the smaller the boat the more I used and the costs are exponentially less. A trailer sailer best in more sheltered waters. I sailed Dovkie in the Chesapeake Bay area, Buzzards Bay and Penobscot Bay; warm shallow waters. I sail my Cal in the Puget Sound; deep cold waters. I wouldn't want to Dovekie in Puget Sound. Dovekie however is ideal in shallow waters. So I can have a great cruising experience in areas where I can get privacy and natural environment even in urban areas because I can go where the big boats can't. The trailer sailer allows a wide range of cruising destinations since I can get there at 60 MPH where my Cal takes a few days. We only spend two nites on Dovkie whare the the Cal's good for a week. Quite a while ago there was a magazine Small Boat Journal one issue did review comparisons of these types of boats. I could scan it and send it if you want.
 

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Nice gunkholing pic! Does the Bay Hen has water ballasts?
No, Bay Hen relies on form stability and reefing. Sharpie type hull. Made for shallow water, bays, rivers, canals and wetlands, which in many ways are the most interesting places to gunk hole.

I downsized from a 35 foot live aboard and I don't miss the bigger boat at all. Can't see myself going back to that kind of sailing, I can just get to so many more interesting places by trailering than I could by sailing a bigger boat.

Heres a pic of the boat on the trailer with the camper top up.
 

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The article I'm referring to is different article it's from Small Boat Journal which isn't being published now so tis articles are no on the web. It was in the Nov. 1984 edition and compared Bay Hen, Dovkie, Drascome Coaster, Gloucester 19, Montgomery 17, Old World 18, and Slipper. They were boats that were at the Small Boat Show at the time. There are other like boats at the time like West Wright Potter, Catalina 22, that are still around as used boats.
 

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Whitewater to Seawater
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Discussion Starter #15
Yes, cabin height around the keel is 1,30m (51"). Double V-birth is 2.05m (80") x 1.78m (70") and each side birth is 2m (79") x 0.65m (26"). The Flow 19 on its trailer weights a total of 1,653 lbs and can easily towed by a mid-size car.
 

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Equipping it for your needs is the key to camp sailing.
Arch has his cover.
Play around with some cheap wally tarps, figure out what will work, get you measurements down...then add it.
Note things that bug you. We are all different.
Have fun solving the problems
Both boat and the shore...are yours
 

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We have a Capitol Yachts Neptune 24 that we trailer sail. It's nice to have that shallow draft, we only draw 2 ft. or so with the center board up. Definitely fun to spend the day backed up to the beach (I like to anchor stern in so we can use the ladder to wade in), or hiding out in a little cove overnight. The wife and kids had to get used to the porta potty, but otherwise good to go! I'm in Ohio, and State Parks that have campgrounds will usually let you leave the car overnight after using the ramps. You just have to move the truck and trailer to a different parking lot (lots of campers leave their tow vehicles up there). It's a lot safer than leaving it in an unmonitored lot.
 

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