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What do you Wear Cruising & Going Ashore?

  • Synthetic only

    Votes: 7 17.9%
  • Cotton/Natural only

    Votes: 10 25.6%
  • A mix of both

    Votes: 16 41.0%
  • Really don't care/ whatever Wife/Hubbie/Mom tells me

    Votes: 6 15.4%
  • Nudie Rudie (at sea!)

    Votes: 3 7.7%
  • Sailing Logo clothes

    Votes: 3 7.7%
  • Non-Logo sailing clothes

    Votes: 8 20.5%
  • I do not dress like a cruiser/sailor

    Votes: 5 12.8%
  • Blazer & Captains Cap

    Votes: 4 10.3%
  • Blazer only (Special occasions)

    Votes: 1 2.6%

  • Total voters
    39
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Administrator
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
In another thread someone said when cruising in the Tropics or sub-tropics they *always* were synthetic materials.
I *always* wear cotton or natural.

When Cruising (Not Racing) and going ashore what's your attire on board and when you hit the town?

Blazers and Captains Caps!!!!!!!!!!!

You can click as many options as suit.... (snigger) ... and the Poll is private so your name is not listed :)


Mark
 

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Old soul
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I currently cruise cooler climes, although it still gets damn hot in the heat of summer at times. I think most of my clothes are synthetics of some sort, but to be honest, I’ve not really thought about it.

Most of my shirts are vented, pants are lights. Not much gets worn at night, and as little as needed when we’re away from others.

I guess I tend to wear what is available at the thrift shop, or the Sally-Ann. Beggars can’t be choosers :wink.
 

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Poll: What do you wear Cruising & Going Ashore?

Weird, this isn’t showing up as a poll in the Tapatalk browser.

In any case, when racing or working, it’s all technical synthetics. When Relaxing or cruising, or a day at the office, cotton is fine.

Underwear is more important than outerwear. When racing it’s a wicking ploy tee and athletic synthetic boxer briefs. Cruising I’m fine with cotton boxers and tee. Daily office life, cotton.

Of course, even most cotton tees have some synthetic content, today.
 

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Thanks Mark. Good idea. I’m interested as well. Too bad can’t fragment further. Wife wanted to go full synthetic as although plumbed for it we never installed the Splendide. So other than bedding most wash is done in the galley sinks. Still have been unable to find a laundromat with decent functional dryers.
She has some batik dresses for fancy restaurant evenings and I have some button down shirts for the same but day to day it’s synthetics. As you know the constant fight in the tropics is against mold. On the boat and you. Once wet, even from just a dinghy ride, cotton just doesn’t work. Also it’s cold when wet. We do use smart wool and boiled wool up north but still answered “synthetic “ to keep in the spirit of your poll.
Thanks again for starting this poll.
 

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Poll selections need to drop the "only".

I wear a range of clothing mostly depending on the season/weather.
In summer I wear mostly cotton Ts, polos shirts... henleys, long and short sleeves... no logos...
I do have slightly more "dressy" shirts if I don't want to not look like a boat bum ashore.
I have some "ice silk" tops light easy to wash... super comfy but skin tight.

I have multiple wind breakers, jackets in different weights. I keep one in my car and use it if I arrive for the trip to the boat and weather changes.

Like Sebago spinnakers... but they wear out... tried Swims... sole too narrow... never wear sneakers... prefer bare feet.

Several shorts... again in different weights and numbers of pockets...

Sweat shirts, cotton long sleeve hoodies

Trousers are; jeans, sweats, jeggings, running and travel pants which are synthetic waterproof, light and very comfy.

I wear a baseball or "engineer's cap"

old foulies... ready for the trash...

I have a very light gauge neoprene suit for cold weather sailing...inexpensive and highly recommended... maybe better than foulies???

Comfort is most important. I am no fashion plate! Wear the same sort of clothing off the boat /home/work (at home).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Im a jeans kinda guy, or shorts and TShirts all cotton or natural fabrics. Joggers and flip-flops, definitely not Boat Shoes.

Pretty much exactly that for the first 5 years....

But then heading to New York I loved being able to dress nicely once again.
I love dressing up to go to a nice restaurant in the Caribbean or anywhere. And most cruising women relish occasionally getting out of grungy clothes, splashing on some makeup and leaving their bandanna'd pretend pirate hubby at home.

Ummmmm, yes, I do have a Blazer in the wardrobe, club tie, propa pants etc... not that I wear them often, but you always need to be ready if an invitation gets dropped on deck.

All my clothes that you could recognise as sailing clothes have been given to me as part of some promo, rally, sailing event etc. I only wear them when no one can see me LOL
 

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bell ringer
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I wear shorts, sandals, tee-shirts or a wicking shirt (that I get at Walmart for $6.98) mostly. I did wear long pants once this past Dec and last June I think I worn socks and tennis shoes to walk around DC one day.
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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Before I left a well known sailing school I set a personal goal of obtaining a wardrobe of their branded Gill sailing apparel from the Ops manager du jour, because the hourly pay rate - no benefits - would be an embarrassment to the company if it was known. As a result I have and love Gill Mens UV TEC Teeshirts in both short and long sleeve. These are 100% polyester and provide SPF 50 UV protection. I also have a Gill Technical UV cap, a Gill Helford Polo (for trade shows), a Gill Mens Fleece Jacket, a Gill Crew Sport Jacket, and a Gill Inshore Lite Rain Jacket. All of these are synthetic or synthetic blend.
 
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For pants it's mostly jeans or shorts depending on the temperature. For shirts in summer it's a Columbia, Cabelas or similar lightweight fishing shirt. Lived in just two of them on my recent charter in the Exumas. They rinse and dry fast. When Autumn starts approaching I shift over to flannel shirts. When I start wearing a wool watch cap for most of the day it's time to put the boat back in the boatyard. :)
 

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During the day, especially while sailing, I typically wear all quick dry clothing. It’s primary advantage, of course, is that it will dry quickly, if I take spray, rain or sweat through it. Cotton never seems to dry, if it gets wet. Also, they are much easier to launder aboard.

However, I do find quick dry type shirts to feel a bit like wearing a plastic bag. They don't typically breath as well. I do have some that are lighter material and vented that help in the height of the summer or when cruising in the caribe.

Our cruising pattern generally involves a shower at the end of the day, unless underway. Wash off all the sweat and sunscreen. A cotton shirt for cocktails and dinner feels really good then.

I don’t even own a pair of jeans, let alone would I wear them aboard.

Whenever practical, I prefer to be barefoot. If I need toe protection or the decks are too hot, it’s slip on boat shoes, which I keep under the cockpit table and slip right back off, when I sit down. Much easier than lacing anything up temporarily. I also keep flip flops and a pair of sneakers aboard. The flops typically go to shore.
 

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snake charmer, cat herder
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synthetics give me rashes.
cotton works well and best for me, as i use all natural fibers and silk is quite pricey, and i am allergic to wool as well as polys.
i will wear nor own absolutely NOTHING which shows yottiness or other fakery.
polys increase your body heat so cotton is best.
i love watching gringos faint from heat prostration wearing their funky polys. tropics is not the place for any kind of body heat increasing clothing. save those for arctic circle misadventures.
even poly sheets are heat increasing issues in tropics. all cotton for me. works well. and no if the garment/item says 100 percent cotton it is cotton, nothing added. just need to look at the labels. read them to know what is in your items purchased from foodstuffs to outerwear to bedding.
 

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I've culled all the cotton stuff out of my boat wardrobe. Cotton absorbs water, is a great breeding ground for bacteria especially when damp and takes forever to dry. Got tired of having t-shirts and shorts that were always clammy and stinky. Still have a wool sweater but have gone over to mostly fleece for cold weather clothing.
 

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Master Mariner
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Sorry, there's nothing on your list that we can relate to.
 

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Z respectively disagree. Cotton never dries in the humid times in the islands. There are days you dress all the lifelines with laundry and wait all day. Cotton is still damp. Synthetics dry quickly in the sun and wind. So you rig a line below knowing if you put even slightly damp cotton away it will rot or stink. If left out in the morning it isn’t damp it’s wet from morning condensation. We have synthetics because when the cotton is ruined isn’t reasonable to replace with more of the same. Have one set of cotton sheets. They have a high thread count and are comfortable. They aren’t used during rainy season but stored in a locker with two rid damps.
 

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I’m sure it depends where you are.

In college I had a job doing field work in the near-desert of western North Dakota. I wore jeans and cotton t-shirts all the time. It was like zero percent humidity. It didn’t matter if you got wet, you’d be dry in minutes. Sure you’d sweat several gallons a day, but it evaporated immediately.


But in a humid area? No cotton for me, especially jeans. I’m not a cruiser, but when I go on charter trips I encourage the guests to get some synthetic pants. Nothing is worse than getting your pants wet from a splash or a dinghy ride and then having to sit in wet cotton all day.

Maybe in the old days polyester was hotter than cotton, but certainly not now. There's a reason you don't see marathon runners and distance cyclists wearing cotton. I biked 150 miles this weekend; I was wearing spandex and polyester.
 

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snake charmer, cat herder
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you say cotton doesnot dry fast.
hah
cotton clothing dries fast. jeans not so much but i amnot horse riding. i wear jeans for horse riding.
summer weight cotton clothing is fast drying. no issue. synthetics kill --- heat prostration is real and synthetic fibers help- bodies retain heat. not good in 100-120f temps.
 

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This business about heat prostration hasn’t been my experience. You wear loose baggy fishing shirt. Loose baggy pants or shorts. I favor shorts as on a boat your lower legs see much less sun. Shirt is vented across the back and both arm pits. Although spf 60 to 100 due to weave and material wind goes right through it. If I’m going to be in shade wear dark colors which radiate heat. If in sun light colors or white.
Centuries ago desert people figured out being fully clothed with wicking materials that are not tightly fitted is cooler. I’ve worn both cotton and synthetics in the tropics and sub tropics. There’s no question in my mind you’re just plain wrong on this. Cotton gets wet. Either from spray or sweat. If the water dries some it leaves salt crystals. They shafe your skin and make you miserable. If it’s humid cotton just absorbs your sweat so you are miserable in that soggy rag. Air moving across your body cools you. Water sitting in a hot damp cotton garment feels like a wet suit.
 
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