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Seems beyond this immediate issue there maybe another divide. Noise. I hate noise pollution of any sort. Whether the source is diesel or gas engines, or even cooling water splash. Believe in the golden rule so mute or turn off our cockpit speakers unless underway. Try to follow the rule if you can hear anything from the boat from 6' away it's too noisy.
In process of trying to design and build another enclosure beyond the stock enclosure for the lombardini as find it too noisy. Thinking of sewing up a cloth enclosure using nomex or fiberglass welding mat. Will incorporate baffles to allow air flow but not noise egress. Can slip it on/off as necessary. May add another set of vibration isolators to it's base. Think all high rev gensets are too noisy but this one is particularly bad. Would appreciate thoughts about materials and techniques to do this.

So folks, whatever you decide please run it in the middle of the day. Please run as briefly as possible. Please think about ways you can decrease the noise.
 

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....So folks, whatever you decide please run it in the middle of the day. Please run as briefly as possible. Please think about ways you can decrease the noise.
Totally fair.
 

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MaineSail.... Sorry you feel this way... But others were just as rude citing 'Darwin Awards' and stupidity for using these generators... those aren't my words... maybe look back at some of the comments... I'm sure they were just as rude and unnecessary as well... we're all not stupid idiots here are we?
If my post came off to sound as if folks who choose to use these are "stupid" that was not my intent at all. I can see how using the term Darwin Award could suggest people being stupid or dumb but it was not my intent. My intent was more about the end result state your body could be in. I apologize if it sounded as if I was referring to all portable genny users as stupid or dumb..

It was to suggest folks could wind up DEAD. Many smart people have died from CO poisoning.

My point was that the use of these quite often has folks thinking they are safer than they really are. Folks are easily lulled into a sense of safety by others using them or 10 uses and no death etc.. One could certainly wind up in a Darin Award state (meaning dead), as has happened, if not careful.

The "station wagon effect" is real on boats both at anchor and underway and sadly it is rarely if ever talked about..

My point was if she has done the portable generator use why do some question it if they themselves do not have one? Why not take her advice as well as others that ACTUALLY have the Hondas or other generators and instead of ranting about the use and the knowledge of the user why not let it go? Why not buy one and go through the paces of using one before questioning the ability or experience of users of these generators,
Why are the opinions of those of us who do have them, and choose not to use them, apparently discounted or not as valid or valuable in terms of input?

I personally won't use my portable gas Honda EU2000 on board our boat. I do own one and have made that decision for myself and family. Even with a marine CO detector, which we have, I still choose to not use it.

When I have to use my EU2000, for working on customers boats, (I try to avoid it at all costs but most of my customers are on moorings) I carry a Safe-T-Alert CO detector with me and tap it into the ships 12V. Even though I often run the EU2K in my Maritime Skiff, tied to the back of a customers boat, at 15' to 20' off, it has set off the CO detector twice most likely due to station wagon effect.

I just don't believe these are as safe as the masses would have us believe and yes, I do own one. I do believe the use of portable genny's is not as safe as many assume it is but that is jut my apparently discounted/invalid opinion...:wink

Can they be used pretty safely or more safely? Absolutely, but there is still risk. Until I see everyone using one in a safe manner and who also have a Xintex or Safe-T-Alert Marine UL CO detector, you'll see me cautioning their use.

My main point is that folks need to use these SAFELY and many do not, heck most I have seen do not. Does this make the users "stupid"? Absolutely not just perhaps not as well informed about safe use as they should or could be and this could put them in a Darwin Award state, which means dead....

Honestly, show of hands,:wink how many here, with a portable genny, have a less than 5 year old (they expire) Xintex or Safe-T-Alert Marine UL CO detector?

I was on a boat last August and checked the residential grade Smoke/CO detector and found NO BATTERIES. When I asked the owner, who also has a Honda EU2000, why no batteries,

"Oh the galley stove sets the smoke detector off too much."

We then had a long conversation about CO, using proper detectors etc, and he now has a Safe-T-Alert... This guy is not stupid but could have been dead because he "forgot" to put the batteries back in.. Forgot is not being stupid, it happens to even the smartest among us, but it could still wind up with he or his wife in a permanently horizontal state...
 

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We then had a long conversation about CO, using proper detectors etc, and he now has a Safe-T-Alert... This guy is not stupid but could have been dead because he "forgot" to put the batteries back in.. Forgot is not being stupid, it happens to even the smartest among us, but it could still wind up with he or his wife in a permanently horizontal state...
I agree. Forgetting things isn't about smart, it's about memory. Why do you think so many of us tie the key to the diesel's water intake valve when we close it?
 

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Late to the party here, but I do use a Honda portable genny on the aft deck of our center cockpit ketch every other day or so. We have a big fridge, a big freezer, 2 kids, so big electrical loads. Windy/sunny days we can go 3 before Honda comes out, but that's about it. We aren't the type to motor or motorsail unless we absolutely have to though.

For MS, we do have a 3 year old xintrex Co detector mounted in the aft cabin. Honda sits with exhaust pointed out over transom centerline (vertical transom, no transom ports, always at anchor swinging into the wind). No issues so far.

We also have a Fisher Panda mini 8 inboard diesel generator that I can't wait to rip out. Total junk regarding reliability/maintenance (gen head bearing replacement every 1k hours - really?). Faulty sensors, failure to shut down ( like a gas engine on too low octane) , the list goes on. Plus that lightly loaded 7.5kw gen uses more fuel than our loaded Honda. 1/4 load on Panda (15.6A 120ac) uses approx 1/2 gallon per hour - same burn rate as 50% load on the same Panda. Full load on Honda yields approx 4 hrs run time on .9 gallons (13.3A load). Let's not start on the one less wet exhaust, no belts, no extra diesel filters, no additional sources for leaks inside the boat, etc.

Fwiw, there was a Lagoon 380 cat anchored near me in a quiet anchorage today. They fired up their Honda this afternoon on their stern deck about 200' away. It sounded like a dinghy/outboard from significantly farther away-i was not bothered in the least. And this is in a relatively quiet low wind anchorage with 5 boats total.
 

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I talked with my son last night and he said the exhaust hose he's using was purchased at a local auto parts shop. It is made of some special kind of rubber that is heat resistant and clamps to the exhaust pipe of his generator. He is using a generator that he purchased from Harbor Freight, which allows him to have access to the exhaust pipe.

Gary :cool:
 

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The "station wagon effect" is real on boats both at anchor and underway and sadly it is rarely if ever talked about..
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When I have to use my EU2000, for working on customers boats, (I try to avoid it at all costs but most of my customers are on moorings) I carry a Safe-T-Alert CO detector with me and tap it into the ships 12V.
Maine Sail, given your experience with temporary location of CO detectors, do you have an opinion on the best location for one? I am not a gen user, but do care about the station wagon effect from my diesel at anchor.
 

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The specific gravity of Carbon Monoxide is 0.9657 (with normal air being 1.0), this means that it will float up towards the ceiling because it is lighter than regular air. However, when a build up of dangerous levels of CO gas is taking place, this is nearly always due to a heat source that is not burning its fuel correctly (motor vehicle exhaust fumes are an exception). This heated air can form a layer near your ceiling which can prevent the Carbon Monoxide from reaching a ceiling detector.

For this reason I strongly suggest that it is best to mount your detectors on the walls at least a couple of feet below the height of the ceiling. If your detector has a digital read-out, then I recommend placing it at about eye level so you can easily read it. Or if you have some other structure, like the exposed beam in this photograph insdide my house which is positioned below the ceiling level, then you can attach your carbon monoxide detectors to it instead.

I got this just by googling carbon monoxide detector locations.

Gary :cool:
 

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The specific gravity of Carbon Monoxide is 0.9657 (with normal air being 1.0), this means that it will float up towards the ceiling because it is lighter than regular air. However, when a build up of dangerous levels of CO gas is taking place, this is nearly always due to a heat source that is not burning its fuel correctly (motor vehicle exhaust fumes are an exception). This heated air can form a layer near your ceiling which can prevent the Carbon Monoxide from reaching a ceiling detector.

For this reason I strongly suggest that it is best to mount your detectors on the walls at least a couple of feet below the height of the ceiling. If your detector has a digital read-out, then I recommend placing it at about eye level so you can easily read it. Or if you have some other structure, like the exposed beam in this photograph insdide my house which is positioned below the ceiling level, then you can attach your carbon monoxide detectors to it instead.

I got this just by googling carbon monoxide detector locations.

Gary :cool:
A specific gravity difference of .0343 is so miniscule that a single breath, an open port, someone opening or closing a door in an adjacent room is enough to send the CO in another direction up, down or sideways. My safety training has been that CO detectors be near head level in room being protected for that reason e.g. bed level, close to headboard in sleeping accomodations
 

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It all depends upon the volume of gas - and of course, the temperature. I treated hundreds of CO poisoning patients in the 15 years I spend working in medicine, and I can assure you that it doesn't require a lot of CO to enter the bloodstream to be deadly. If it were not for hyperbaric therapy, which I worked with back in the 1960s, there would be a lot more CO deaths in Baltimore.

Gary :cool:
 

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Ok so pretty much, most of the repsonses are don't buy a generator cause you'll die due to CO
Nah! Just be careful about the placement and you won't have any problems at all. And, of course, get an inexpensive CO detector, which can keep you out of trouble.

Good luck,

Gary :cool:
 

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Honda guy here...sorry I'm late. A few facts:

• No Honda generators are Coast Guard approved. Honda does not recommend their use aboard any craft.

• The EU2000i has a splash-type lubrication system, not pressurized, and there is an engine shut-down sensor (float-type) if the oil level falls below a minimum level. This sensor can engage more readily if the generator is operated at an angle vs. flat and level.

• The EU2000i has a vacuum-style (not electric) fuel pump. Most generators are simple fuel tanks with gravity-feed designs, but the compact design of the EU2000i means the carburetor sits above the fuel tank sump, so a pump is required.

• There are no special hardware or treatment of materials to make them marine grade or less susceptible to corrosion.

- - -
I work for Honda, but the preceding is my opinion alone.
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Honda guy here...sorry I'm late. A few facts:

• No Honda generators are Coast Guard approved. Honda does not recommend their use aboard any craft.

• The EU2000i has a splash-type lubrication system, not pressurized, and there is an engine shut-down sensor (float-type) if the oil level falls below a minimum level. This sensor can engage more readily if the generator is operated at an angle vs. flat and level.

• The EU2000i has a vacuum-style (not electric) fuel pump. Most generators are simple fuel tanks with gravity-feed designs, but the compact design of the EU2000i means the carburetor sits above the fuel tank sump, so a pump is required.

• There are no special hardware or treatment of materials to make them marine grade or less susceptible to corrosion.

- - -
I work for Honda, but the preceding is my opinion alone.
[email protected]
I agree but, it is still a great generator to use on board as long as you use some common sense. Though one has to keep an eye on corrosion issue. Especially the case screws as I found out when I had to replace the pull cord after five years of use: THE BIANKA LOG BLOG: RELIABILITY: So much for that!
About to start my 9th season with it and plan to change out the muffler due to some rusting around the screw heads. Still a great product to have on board and complements my electric propulsion system very nicely.
 

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Over the years I've heard lots of people rave about their Hondas. Just curious...has anyone seen that infomercial about the new Generac 2000 inverter style generator. Made to compete directly with the Honda 2000 and has a couple nice features the Honda doesn't have. They say it is even a few decibels quieter than the Honda and about $200 less. Looked like a pretty nice unit. Generac is a pretty good company and seems they own the home generator market.
 
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