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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi roomies.. I read somewhere on here about a portable stick pump so to speak.. In process of hooking marine a/c up. I have an water outlet for the cooling water but dont have a thru hull fitting for seawater intake. Someone said they built a simple pump (shurflo) etc, and just drop intake hose over the side when at anchor.. Any ideas?? I have a few ideas of my own but always looking for help..
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The problem will be getting the pump primed and pumping. A centrifugal pump will not work. A positive displacement pump (vane, diaphragm, etc.) will self-prime if above the waterline, but the distance the pump can be above the waterline varies greatly from pump to pump. I would install a dedicated through hull and be done with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The way it has been hooked up before,, PO has a water outlet installed BUT on the intake side, he has a water hose hook up for marina usage. It was a real find for me. Was cleaning under v berth and FOUND the Eastern Marine 6500 btu unit hidden .Didnt even know it was on the boat when we bought it. It works like brand new and even looke new.. Ya hoo.. But I aint real crazy about a haul out and putting another hole in the boat until this winter when I will pull it out and cleaning bottom..
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sailormann.. The never ending question??? How will it draw my batterys down?? I was thinking of a 110 v pump for ,,IF and when i ever get a Honda 1000-2000 generator..
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Going to install a/c unit in head near the cockpit. Will be very close to the engine compartment. I was thinking , would I be able to tee into seawater intake for the yanmar 20GM20F, (Freshwater cooled)???? say like inline before the seawater pump for engine coolant cooling?? I really dont want to have my boat look like swiss cheese adding more holes.. lol Holes are a BAD THING in a boat right??hahahaha Thanks in advance
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On most boats a dedicated through-hull is indeed the way to go, but on my boat I have an older solution...a standpipe with multiple T-fittings. Basically, it's a three or four inch pipe open to the ocean that rises to a point several inches above the waterline and has a pipe cap that screws on and is frequently gasketed. From this are run several 1/2" or 3/4" fittings with their own seacocks which feed the head, the engine, the A/C. the watermaker, etc.

Standpipes used to be also used in galleys for a drain you simply plugged at the sink...no seacock, no need to turn it on or off.

The advantages of having only one intake hole in the bottom are obvious, while the disadvantages include not many modern boats having the vertical height in an accessible position to install this sort of set-up. Also, being able to literally remove the cap and peer down the pipe makes it easier to diagnose clogs (including fish needing removal), but if a seacock fails, you would do well to have a big wooden plug you can jam into the bottom of the boat in order to change out the faulty seacock.
 

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Sailormann.. The never ending question??? How will it draw my batterys down?? I was thinking of a 110 v pump for ,,IF and when i ever get a Honda 1000-2000 generator..
Not sure - it's 12 volts so I guess you'd need a converter to change your shorepower to DC... just remembered seeing that item when I read your post and figured it might be what you needed ... up here in the Great White North we don't have much need for AC on our boats - heaters are popular though :)
 

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On most boats a dedicated through-hull is indeed the way to go, but on my boat I have an older solution...a standpipe with multiple T-fittings. Basically, it's a three or four inch pipe open to the ocean that rises to a point several inches above the waterline and has a pipe cap that screws on and is frequently gasketed. From this are run several 1/2" or 3/4" fittings with their own seacocks which feed the head, the engine, the A/C. the watermaker, etc.
Wouldn't this also be know as a seachest? But a really small one?
 
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