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I've been in a knockdown only once --- and that was deliberate, as we were doing a capsize course on a 19' Flying Scott. But I've also sailed on boats that were heeled so much that everything that was unsecured slid onto the sole.

Not good. So, my question: "How do YOU set up your boat's interior to ensure that things which are not in locked drawers / cupboards won't fly or slide around?"
 

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I've been in a knockdown only once --- and that was deliberate, as we were doing a capsize course on a 19' Flying Scott. But I've also sailed on boats that were heeled so much that everything that was unsecured slid onto the sole.

Not good. So, my question: "How do YOU set up your boat's interior to ensure that things which are not in locked drawers / cupboards won't fly or slide around?"
Take wide angle photo's of the yacht's interior. Print them in 8x10 format. Pin them, upside down, to your lavatory wall opposite the commode. Contemplate them whenever you use same, concentrating on what you see that will fall/go flying at such attitude and take measures accordingly. Put your thinking cap on and use your head for more than a hat rack instead of repeatedly asking inane questions. It might be a novel experience.
 

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My boat isn't designed for offshore (locking storage all over it, etc) so we make sure all glass is secured, bottles are in the second sink, I bought a bunch of colorful non-skid matts from the dollar store that actually work. The laptop and iPad sit on them as does the container we use for water that's on the galley counter (moved to the floor if conditions call for it).

Everything that can get into a closed storage compartment behind or under the berth goes into one.

Our boat sails better flat but sometimes heeling is unavoidable.
 

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Master Mariner
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We actually try quite hard not to let ourselves get knocked down. We sail mostly reefed and when sailing the lees of the islands where the wind can come whistling down the valleys at 2 to 3 times ambient wind speed, we only fly the Yankee. Remaining at the helm and maintaining a good watch will minimize the chances of being knocked down. I will completely douse sail before an approaching severe squall hits, and have even brought her head to wind, under power, if it seems prudent.
That being said, I have been capsized 3 times (in one storm) and honestly, everybody's cabin is going to be a mess at that point. Things like rocks in the bilge used for ballast and floorboards which could possibly have been secured probably wouldn't have remained secured in those conditions.
In the case of knock downs, an ounce of prevention surely is worth a pound of cure.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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The best solution to glass breakage is to not have any. There are many things to think about in this topic. Hatches need to be secured so things in the bilge can't get out, heavy objects need to be tied to padeyes, fuel containers need to be 100% secure, batteries need to be completely secure, etc. I have small padeyes all over the place to tie stuff down. There is nothing more annoying than hearing things flying about below so it's something that really needs some forethought. Things you never even thought of will find a way to careen through air as if by magic:)

There's a good section in Siefert's book on this stuff: Offshore Sailing: 200 Essential Passagemaking Tips: William Seifert, Daniel Spurr: 9780071374248: Amazon.com: [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51e%[email protected]@[email protected]@51e%2BKIGI00L

This is a great book, recommended to me by another Sailnetter.

One thing I would add is to mount your radios where they will not be in the water should you do a complete roll over. Somewhere not right next to the cabin top which could become filled with a few inches of water. A submerged SSB will not do much good if it gets submerged in salt water.
 

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Hey,

I have never prepared for a knock down and doubt that I ever will. I'm mostly a fair weather sailor and plan on staying that way. I do go out in high winds, and before I leave my mooring I try to remember to stow all gear so it won't go flying around if we heel 40 degrees.

Barry
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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Guilty, we had two hanging pots under the dodger for growing some greens when we were knocked down in southern French Polynesia. Had them for thousands of miles with not a lick of problem until we got hammered by 55 knots and a big wave breaking at an inconvenient spot. Not only did we have a bunch of water in the cockpit we had a kind of mud. Almost worth it to see the Admiral helping the scuppers by bailing with a large plastic flower pot with four good-sized drainage holes in it. Works well, if you are motivated enough.

For the OP who is worried about knockdowns, I would suggest there are many other concerns that should take precedence over this one. Off the top of my head I would suggest avoiding falling overboard, fire, and falls onboard would be much greater risks.
 
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We got knocked down in a storm a couple of years ago everything from the starboard side ended up on the port side.A bottle of whiskey flew 12 feet across the cabin and hit the hull on the other side and didnt break,we were lucky no damage no one hurt just a mess to clean up.It was an eye opener for me now I stow everything down tight before a voyage.
 

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We've never been knocked down, but are pretty good about securing things below. Nevertheless, many will come aboard and wonder how the magazines in racks, coasters on the tables, cushions, etc, don't get tossed. We've spent plenty of time with the rail in the water and bobbing around like a cork with bare poles. Still, it doesn't have to be as draconian to keep things generally in place, for these conditions.

However, to make an offshore passage, I'm a firm believer in full lock down. We have a few dozen quick connect fittings to install in floor boards (which I haven't gotten to yet), the salon table leaves would be strapped, everything comes off the shelves, etc. Offshore racing rules have some standards about this that may be helpful to the OP. However, if not really sailing in conditions that could cause such a stir, there isn't a reason to go too far with it.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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I have found that preparing for the worst is a lot easier at the dock than after you discover that the weatherman was way wrong. Sailing singlehanded, doing things at the dock may be the only chance you get to secure things for a long time. Securing stuff is only one of many things that come under the category of thinking ahead.

For the floorboards and hatches under bunks and such, I have simply countersunk some holes for screws. If going offshore, the screws go in. It takes only seconds to remove them if I need to see into the bilge or get something.
 
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Great thread and video. Thank you. Keep heavy stores in lockers under settee cushions amidships. This includes food and drink. Having these boards screwed down does not seem practical. Have you any other thoughts?
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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The best solution to glass breakage is to not have any.
I don't agree. We've broken one piece of crystal in eight years and that was at anchor. The booze locker, properly padded, has plenty of glass in it. Lots of products in the pantry are in glass. You give up a huge amount of comfort and flexibility by saying "no glass."

The key is to set storage up ahead of time and ALWAYS put things away. Don't get ready for sea - always be ready for sea. Otherwise you WILL forget something.

There is nothing more annoying than hearing things flying about below so it's something that really needs some forethought.
The answer is toilet paper and paper towels. You need them any way so stock up and use them for padding and rattle reduction. Most of the books about passagemaking lose sight of the changes that happen as you eat up supplies. Padding and rattle-reduction is a process.

One thing I would add is to mount your radios where they will not be in the water should you do a complete roll over. Somewhere not right next to the cabin top which could become filled with a few inches of water. A submerged SSB will not do much good if it gets submerged in salt water.
Forget it. You aren't talking about static waterlines. Water will be everywhere. The best you can do is buy the most waterproof gear you can find. This is why there is a cost difference between the Icom 802 and 801E. In real life drips, sprays, and spills are a bigger deal than knock downs.

Well, first, I recommend not having floor lamps or potted plants aboard.
Floor lamps (I don't have any) would need to be bolted down. Potted plants (I keep an orchid) get wedged in. Beyond that they are on their own.

However, to make an offshore passage, I'm a firm believer in full lock down. We have a few dozen quick connect fittings to install in floor boards (which I haven't gotten to yet), the salon table leaves would be strapped, everything comes off the shelves, etc.
Whether you use quarter turn fasteners or screws, fasten the boards down. You don't have to go through a knockdown for the sole to slide around and leave a gap that can break an ankle. Screws need some kind of washer or other force distribution to keep them from pulling through the sole panels.

I have found that preparing for the worst is a lot easier at the dock than after you discover that the weatherman was way wrong.
Depends on where you are going and how far it is. Preparation is a process, not an event. Every time you put something down it should be with regard to where it will go if something goes wrong. Every time. Tools, knives, plates, tomatoes, pots, lunch, clothes, iPods, computers, everything.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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I don't agree. We've broken one piece of crystal in eight years and that was at anchor. The booze locker, properly padded, has plenty of glass in it. Lots of products in the pantry are in glass. You give up a huge amount of comfort and flexibility by saying "no glass."

Forget it. You aren't talking about static waterlines. Water will be everywhere. The best you can do is buy the most waterproof gear you can find. This is why there is a cost difference between the Icom 802 and 801E. In real life drips, sprays, and spills are a bigger deal than knock downs.
My preference is to use plastic cups and plates. It's less to worry about and eliminates the issue of broken glass and cuts. Drinking out of glass is certainly nicer than plastic and more impressive to guests. I try to get beer and soda in cans as well for the same reason. I may be overly cautious but eliminating potential hazards on a boat (which may be far from medical facilities) seems logical.

If you experience the unfortunate event of doing a roll, water will slosh around in the cabin rooftop which becomes the floor for a short period of time before the boat can right itself. In a case such as this why would you want to have the radio where it could be completely submerged? It's pretty simple to NOT have radios mounted up on the cabin roof. In such a catastrophic event, your radio may well save your life in the aftermath. Why not lower the chance it becomes completely submerged? Seems like a no-brainer to put your radios in the safest position possible and protect them as much as possible. Covering them from splash spray with plastic is also not a bad idea either.
 

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I think this thread made a giant leap from "heeling too much" to being offshore and being in a true ass over mast knockdown.
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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I try to get beer and soda in cans as well for the same reason. I may be overly cautious but eliminating potential hazards on a boat (which may be far from medical facilities) seems logical.
I continue to disagree with you about glass.

The problem with cans, especially newer ones, is that vibration leads to pin holes so you end up with a big mess. Drink cans have been a bigger problem for me than glass bottles. Food cans are thicker, and the frequent plastic linings seem to help.

On a boat maintained in a seamanlike fashion, broken glass is an overstated risk, especially compared to the risks associated with knives and tools. Oh, and booms. Flying shackles.

If you experience the unfortunate event of doing a roll, water will slosh around in the cabin rooftop which becomes the floor for a short period of time before the boat can right itself.
As Donna noted we have digressed from heeling to a rollover. Fine.

What I think you fail to recognize is that water will be everywhere. The difference between two inches below the overhead and on the navigation station is not significant. Water will be everywhere.

I haven't been in a rollover. I have been in knockdowns inshore and offshore. I've had other casualties as well. Without that experience you have no idea how much water is everywhere. It's a mess. Water is everywhere. Plastic shields are just another way to collect water. It's EVERYWHERE.
 

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Absolute top of the list of priorities in prepping any cruising boat for a knockdown, or worse, is securing your batteries... They art among the heaviest 'loose' items you have aboard, and few things will cause greater mayhem, or precipitate a more likely disastrous series of cascading failures after a knockdown, than if your batteries are torn free...

Looking at many of today's production boats, it's amazing how little attention many builders give to something of such vital importance... Really has to make one wonder, how secure the ENGINES on many of today's boats might be in the event of something that puts the spreaders in the water... :)
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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By gosh, he's got it! There will be water everywhere. It is not like the video of the boat being rolled gradually in a calm location. You are in an environment that made the boat go ass over tea kettle. It will be like the inside of a washing machine with water being thrown every which way.

First comment. These things don't happen very often at all. Second comment, do what you can to be prepared but don't get anal about it. If you want to have bottles of wine or rum or glass glasses you can, just use common sense. Third comment, if it happens you will likely survive just fine. Perhaps some significant damage but not catastrophic.
 

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You don't have to suffer a knockdown in order to trash a cabin. Sailing in storms/high winds/ large or confused seas will "toss" a cabin. The advice and comments so far have been good. A couple of things not mentioned yet is securing the companionway steps/engine hatch (or doors). I’ve had those come off before. Get the largest Velcro you can find to secure seat cushions in their proper place and not tossed on the cabin sole. A big thing not mentioned is keeping your stern lazarette neat and in order. While your cabin is getting tossed, the same thing is happening in the lazarette with the added danger of something (broom handle for example) getting caught in the steering gear.

You don’t need to be knocked down before water ingression is a problem. Most engines/electrical panels/batteries tend to be located by the companionway. Don’t forget to add weather stripping/water shielding around these vital areas. For fun, take a five gallon bucket and pour water down the companionway to simulate water ingression due to an open or missing hatch. I was in my lazaretes the other day and was amazed at the size of the gaps between the lids and edges.
 
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