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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
*Sorry for the double post, wanted to put it in the right spot.*
Being in the US Navy, I'm used to having a strict Preventive Maintenance schedule. Does anybody have a fully comprehensive schedule that they go by to keep up on the maintenance on their boats? Or know where to find one? I'm sure if I don't have one I will forget something like the PFDs or things that I'm not thinking of right now.
 

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Hi mm. I saw your previous post.

I think if you read this thread you may see why there were no responses:

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/103319-maintenance.html

Having a maintenance schedule is not a bad thing, but beyond the commissioning/de-commissioning, everything is kind of boat-dependent and also dependent on where you sail (temperature) and in what water (salt vs. fresh). Whether you pull your boat in the winter or you keep it in the water year round. How often you sail and in what conditions. If you are one to sail in severe storms just for the hell of it, you'll need to pay more attention to gear and replacement than someone who does lake daysails in fair weather.

I don't keep a schedule but I do keep a detailed maintenance log of when things get done, what we did to fix, upgrades, etc. I also have a list of spare parts so that at any time I can look and see what needs to be replenished, when I ordered it (in case it gets lost in transit). I also keep part numbers.

I hope this helps to get you started.

(I'm going to delete your other thread)
 
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We change the generator oil and filter every 150 hours, without fail. The genny oil gets checked every single morning, but the fresh water only once a month or so. The oil, trans fluid and water on the engine get checked once every 24 hours if operating that long and every time before start up, each day of operation. There are new, clean oil absorb pads, under both the genny and engine/tranny which are checked often (at least daily) for leaks and changed very frequently.
Everything else is dependent on use (or lack thereof) and availability of anything needed for the maintenance. The sea strainers for the genny and watermaker are checked several times a week, but the others only several times a year, unless the water flow diminishes. Battery water is checked roughly once a month.
The standing and running rigging is obviously visually inspected on every sail, the steering gear inspected and lubed twice a year.
Main engine maintenance as recommended by the manufacturer, but if it wasn't run for 6 months or more it would get an oil change/filter before going back into service. Impellers do not get checked or changed on our boat unless they need it; I'm a firm believer in "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" for impellers.
I think living aboard and using the equipment frequently, you are a lot more in tune with your equipment and therefor a schedule is much less important. The worst thing one can do to a boat is NOT use it, so if you are a casual user, your maintenance may be far beyond what someone who lives aboard considers "normal".
 

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We have one. It is mostly a compilation of items from the main engine and getset manuals. Then I add filters, hoses, cutlass bearing and packing gland and few others. Definitely comes in handy. Some items are not done on an easily remembered calendar basis, but after say 400 hours, like cleaning the injectors. I would never remember the last time, if it wasn't recorded.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies. I have printed a version of small boat preventive maintenance that we use in the Navy. I'm going to simplify it and take out specifics that can't be posted. I can post a picture of it when I have enough posts if anybody is interested.
 

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I keep a flexible three hole binder aboard, with all my lists inside. The maintenance section begins with the list you are creating. Right behind it are hand drawings of dimensions, model numbers, serial numbers, etc, etc. I keep everything I ever measure or replace written down. Very often I am home and wish I remembered something, or need to order something and the boat is hours away.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Minnewaska. I've heard of a sailing log but I'm pretty sure that is different from what we are referring to. Sounds good only wish I could import the tried and true maintenance tracking program that the Navy uses. But I think that would be taking too far as DRFerron alluded to. It seems like the most important thing is to keep track of things that you do repair. I just prefer being Proactive vice Reactive. But these have all been great inputs.
 

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I used to use a notebook, but now I use Evernote.

I considered this
Intelligent Maintenance? - A ShipShape Sailboat (PC)

an tried the free trial. It seemed quite comprehensive, but I ended up back with my own notes in evernote.
Evernote rocks. I even pay for the Premium version. But I keep boat related maintenance stuff with an eye towards handing it over to the next owner when we sell it. Being able to hand over a physical notebook just seems easier in case the next owner is one of those people who hate computers. Plus, I still like writing in notebooks. I do keep the serial numbers in a spreadsheet on my iPad, but the log is in a composition book.
 
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Due to a family that is way to involved in the marine world I face a complicated problem. The family owns nine boats at last count which makes it difficult to try and keep up with all the maintenance that needs to be done fleet wide. To resolve this a few years ago we went to a shareable iCal calander that includes all the scheduled maintenance for every boat, and it pops up on everyone's phone/ipad/computer when it's time for something.

Then everyone is responsible to notate when they finish a maintenance item. If something goes undone for a week it pops up again, then every other day until it is completed.

When we sell a boat, we can then pull a list of every maintenance item done to that boat and print off a hard copy of the list, as well as a schedule for the next year to indicate when things are up for work.

This way we keep on top of things, and have a record of what was done, who did it, when it was done, ect. Since it tracks both routine and breakage items, it also allows us to predict when something will go wrong, or accelerate the replacement cycle for a part (almost always impellers).
 

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I honestly don't get the "check oil every day" advice. Though I've heard it from several sources.

For me checking the oil is a tricky and not entirely risk free process. Sure there is a small chance of an oil issue (to be a problem it would have to not be caught by the alarm), but add it to the list.
 

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I honestly don't get the "check oil every day" advice. Though I've heard it from several sources.

For me checking the oil is a tricky and not entirely risk free process. Sure there is a small chance of an oil issue (to be a problem it would have to not be caught by the alarm), but add it to the list.
I just found a leak from my valve cover gasket by doing so last week. Slight decline in quantity on the stick. Found it dripping down the back of the motor, soaking a motor mount, which is very bad for the mount rubber.

It would have kept running, certainly no oil alarm (just idiot light for me) would have tripped. However, that mount would have been wrecked. Always best to catch trouble early. Low oil alarm is late.
 
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