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Discussion Starter #1
I couldn't locate a thread specifically.

We sold our boat and have begun the search for boat number two. We inquired about one boat, the broker stated is was involved in a serious grounding with keel damage (fin keel);. He stated that it was repaired by a certified boat yard to "insurance specifications" :confused:

I have read on the site that once a boat has had major keel damage...well its like a vehicle that has been involved in a major crash..never drives the same again.

Should any type of major keel damage (even though repaired) automatically exclude a boat or are there parameters that would make it acceptable (ie warranty, certification etc).

Sorry I dont know what the exact damage was.
 

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I would imagine that the stress of an impact like that would be distributed throughout the boat. What potential damage that might cause could be estimated by someone knowledgeable in boat engineering.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would imagine that the stress of an impact like that would be distributed throughout the boat. What potential damage that might cause could be estimated by someone knowledgeable in boat engineering.
Thats what scared me off...I'm the last thing from a marine engineer and Im sure there could be problems that a surveyor couldnt detect.
 

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I think it depends on the type of damage and the type of keel involved. If it were an encapsulated keel, where keel bolts and the associated support structures weren't an issue, then it might be acceptable... but for a fin keeled boat, with the complexity of the keel support structure, I doubt I would find it acceptable. If the big lead weight falls off, you're screwed... :eek:
 

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Given two similar boats, one with that sort of history and another without, it's a no brainer to go for the one that hasn't needed that kind of work.

OTOH if the boat in question appeals to you in all other areas, and there are no others available, then as long as you can ascertain that the repair was done completely and properly (that determination could be very difficult to achieve) I think it need not be a deal-breaker.

I've recently seen a boat that hit some rocks get hauled, repaired, and soon after sailed across to Hawaii and back without incident, and another here locally that was driven aground by a delivery crew, repaired, and subsequently sailed to Australia, did the Sidney Hobart and sailed back to BC without further issues.

The trick is making sure the repair was done by reputable people and done properly. This is where a good surveyor should pay off.
 

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Based on the fact that the broker ised the term "serious grounding" I'd advise you to keep looking. There is a good possbility that this is a hurricane boat - and short of x-raying the hull or using thermal imaging, you can't really tell what kind of condition the boat is in.

There are too many good boats out there to settle for something that may be suspect.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Based on the fact that the broker ised the term "serious grounding" I'd advise you to keep looking. There is a good possbility that this is a hurricane boat - and short of x-raying the hull or using thermal imaging, you can't really tell what kind of condition the boat is in.

There are too many good boats out there to settle for something that may be suspect.

The damage happened in Pacific Northwest so that rules out the hurricane theory, but I understand your point..Im going to get exact details of th eincident damage and repairs and they may seek further opinion before moving on.
 

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A little late to the party, but I'll weigh in....

I always get leery if the "foundation" of something is compromised. By foundation I mean the base at which the rest of the structure is built off of. Examples would be a cars frame/chassis, house concrete foundation and support beams, airplane fuselage stringers and frame members, etc. For a boat this would included the hull stiffeners, keel and support structure and bulkheads for the chain plates.

Even if it has been repaired properly, or as "good as new", the fix is not the same of the surrounding areas. For the fix to have work and be sound, you have to make it stronger than it was initially. A stronger section doesn't react and distribute applied loads to the surrounding supports as a original structure would and in some case puts more stress and strain on neighboring areas than it would have had it been original.

I agree with the others that say that you should move on and look for another boat.

Good Luck.

DrB
 

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The damage happened in Pacific Northwest so that rules out the hurricane theory, but I understand your point..Im going to get exact details of th eincident damage and repairs and they may seek further opinion before moving on.
Hi Sab30,
For what it's worth, we're currently in the process of buying a boat (under agreement), and our search started 7 months ago. I can tell you I would likely have walked from a boat described as you have above. Now, that's without having all the details or viewing the boat, but even with that info, I think I'd always "wonder" if the boat was solid. I just wouldn't want to do that.

Obviously, this is your boat search, so I'm just telling you what I would probably do in the same situation. Regardless of how you proceed, good luck in your boat search. I hope you find the right boat for your needs and have a great 2009 sailing season!
-J
 

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I would certainly not be comforted by rebuilding to "insurance specifications." On the other hand, if a true surveyor who you know to be competent and a competent yard did the work, I would consider it. If you look at the very lengthy thread on the Cape Fear incident, you will see that the Coast Guard inquiry concluded that the cause of the disaster was improperly fixing a keel after a serious grounding. Cosmetics won't do, and if in any doubt, I would pass.
 

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.... a serious grounding with keel damage (fin keel);. He stated that it was repaired by a certified boat yard to "insurance specifications" :confused: .....
Should any type of major keel damage (even though repaired) automatically exclude a boat or are there parameters that would make it acceptable (ie warranty, certification etc).

Sorry I dont know what the exact damage was.
Serious grounding..major damage...can mean almost anything or nothing.

The keel areas on most production boats, especially older production boats, are greatly over-built and capable of taking a lot of abuse without damage that matters. For example back in the day I raced a 1976 C&C 30 in Boston Harbor. The Harbor is has a large collection of rocks and shoals, and any racer worth his or her his salt would end up on either or both once or twice a year. Most boats of that age never suffered significant damage to the keel structure, even if the lead appendage was bent, gouged and divoted. I would flatly say that the keel on a boat like the C&C 30 was imprevious to material damage, abuse it enough and one could rip the whole keel stub out of the hull, but nothing was going to remove the keel from its stub...Newer boats or boats with cored hulls, well buyer beware.

I'd seek the details of the damage and go from there.
 
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