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This is a chart of the asking price for a Catalina 30 from 1975 to 1995. I don't really see a sweet spot, it looks like pretty linear depreciation to me.
Minnesail, thanks for pulling that together. It's a nice contribution of actual data to the discussion.

I looked around for other boats with a large number of listings. The Catalina 36 has 49 listings. The trendline is pretty close to linear, though the datapoints are mostly in a small cluster. I'll see if I can find other examples.
 

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Was there a listing for the sales of these molds?

I thought it would be interesting to be able to find a mold to build boats.

I would have thought a Flicka would be much higher in cost.
I believe the Dana 24 molds were listed for $10k. They are still for sale AFAIK.

I'm not sure about the others, they were bought some time ago and I seem to recall it being a private transaction.
 

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Paulo has mentioned that US boats (Catalina, Hunter in particular) are not modern designs and that European boats are taking part of the US market, while US boats have limited penetration in European markets. I can't really argue with that,....
For the record I did not have said that. What I had said was that European Major brands have their boats designed by some of the best world NA while American major brands have their boats designed in the house. In my opinion when you have the boats designed by the best you have better designs but that is not the same thing to say that the designs of Catalina and Hunter are not modern, whatever that is. I prefer the word contemporary meaning they are exemplar of the state of the art.

Regards

Paulo
 

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Wow, it's tougher than I thought to find boats that (1) have a large number of listings and (2) we produced across a long period of time.

I thought the J/24 would be a great candidate for this, but YW doesn't list many of them. The site seems to focus primarily on larger cruisers, which seem to be produced in smaller batches across shorter periods of time. Are there some makes or models that I may be overlooking?
 

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Daniel - Norsea 27
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Wow, it's tougher than I thought to find boats that (1) have a large number of listings and (2) we produced across a long period of time.

I thought the J/24 would be a great candidate for this, but YW doesn't list many of them. The site seems to focus primarily on larger cruisers, which seem to be produced in smaller batches across shorter periods of time. Are there some makes or models that I may be overlooking?
From what I've seen of YW, it's more for brokers to list what they offer and the larger cruisers give them more commission from the sale. :rolleyes:
 

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Did you have a look at the Delphia's ?
They are semi custom serious ocean sailing boats with amazing value.
At the Chicago Boat Show the sail away packages where:
Delphia 31 $149,000
Delphia 40.3 $289,000
Delphia 46cc $549,000
Delphia 47 $ 395,000
Check them out .

Andrew
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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Did you have a look at the Delphia's ?
They are semi custom serious ocean sailing boats with amazing value.
At the Chicago Boat Show the sail away packages where:
Delphia 31 $149,000
Delphia 40.3 $289,000
Delphia 46cc $549,000
Delphia 47 $ 395,000
Check them out .

Andrew
The Delphia's are pretty nice, albeit slow, coastal cruisers, but I would never call them 'serious offshore sailing boats'. Frankly Elan seems to be a much nicer boat for the dollar.

(And if you are associated with Delphia you need to declare it per forum rules.)

Jeff
 

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Refurbish or buy new largely depends on the boat purchased. It is possible to buy an older boat and bring it to "as new" for a fraction of the price of a new comparable boat. The trick is finding the right boat.

That has always two sides. Pick a 1974 boat and sail an old boat with all the reliability problems related with or bring it to its former glory an put it like a new boat. That means new sails, new rigging,shroud fixation replaced, new mast, new engine, the electrical system replaced, the electronics replaced, keel and rudder dismounted and brought to specs, shroud fixation, painting the boat. In the end you will spend more than what you have speeded in acquiring the boat and if you sell the boat you will found out that it will not sell for a lot more than what you have gave for it.

Buy a new boat and on the first two years you can have on the worst scenario a 30 or 40% loss in value.

Buy a 5 year old boat for 60% of its original value and you will have a loss of value for year of around 5% and you will not need to spend anything on the boat at least for two more years and then will have only to change sails and eventually running rigging (if you like to have a boat as new).

This, for the ones that can afford the initial cost, is by far the best solution in what regards money and quality.

Of course you will not have the top of the crop regarding performance and interior design but will have a much better boat than a 30 year old boat and one that in the end will not be more expensive, if you are going to keep it in tip top condition.

Regards

Paulo
 

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I decided soon after purchasing my current boat and putting almost one-third of the purchase price into repairs, improvements, additional equipment (some maybe quite frivolous) and slip fees the first season that I wouldn't concern myself with resale value. I only keep a loose account of how much it cost me to sail the boat each time based on the money I have in it. The second time out the price per trip was halved. ;)
-CH
 
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