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Discussion Starter #1
We had a beautiful sail up to Philadelphia's Penns Landing on Friday evening. We had dinner and stayed the night. We motored back Saturday due to lack of wind.

All of a sudden my AIS alarm started going off, and I looked back to see this jerk bearing down on me from behind. He was doing 26 knots. I tried hailing him on the radio to warn him of impending collision, both with an open hail (by name) and a DSC (by MMSI). No response. He passed me to starboard about 60 ft away. My worst fear (that he was down below and boat on autopilot) was not realized - he was at the helm with guests. Apparently he was just totally oblivious to the damage that his 4' wake might cause.

I was unable to change course by much before the wake hit. As he approached I was afraid to turn at all because I did not know what side he was going to pass me on. After he passed I had only a couple of seconds to try to get my bow pointed toward the wake. We were tossed around quite a bit since the wake was mostly broadside.

Nothing got permanently damaged on my boat. Things weren't secured like normal because there was no wind and I knew that I would be motoring in totally benign conditions. Fortunately my laptop was stowed on the floor in a bag - I had removed it from the dinette table before departing. But other things did get tossed around quite a bit.

Since I now had his MMSI number in my radio log, I decided to do a little searching online. I can't find the guys name, but his boat name popped up immediately. (The Tardis, MMSI #338186002) I can also see where he spent the night, and also where he apparently keeps his boat during the week. With satellite imagery I can pinpoint it right down to the very slip that he rents. So if there was damage and I wanted to take action, I would have no problem finding the guy.

I wonder if these guys realize that their AIS transponders basically guarantee that they could be held accountable for their stupid actions.
 
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Old soul
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I've had a few similar incidents with idiot powerboats. Ironically, the most recent one was with a Canadian Coast Guard cutter when we were in a narrow marked channel, setting up to enter a marina. We were under sail and this crazy cutter ploughs full-bore past us, throwing a huge wake and leaving us unable to turn into it. Wasn't hard to identify these turkeys.

Interesting use of AIS though TakeFive. It's great you could track them down, although it reinforces my hesitation to use an AIS transponder. Great use in this case, but it's not hard for my suspicious mind to come up with any number of nefarious uses of AIS transmissions (mostly via governments and corporations).
 

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"Securité-Securité, Securité-Securité, Hello all stations with special attention of the US Coast Guard, be advised that the vessel "The Tardis" is recklessly and at high speed and close aboard with severe wake is navigating in the XXX channel on the Delaware River at XXXX° N, XXXX°W in X direction. Im am currently checking for injuries and damage due to the large close aboard wake from this boat "THE TARDIS". USCG Please stand by for further" ........ . Such will 'document' your incident, if needed for further action.
You can also do this by dialing #CG

Id also consider to shot-gun/broadcast a full written detailed report of such an incident to several of the major marine insurance carriers.

Mr. Sheff's "THE TARDIS" is on register at: Office of Science and Technology
 

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Daniel - Norsea 27
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Another thing to consider, you can search for an MMSI with the FCC Ship License Search to find a persons name, and other details. Looking up that guy's MMSI, it doesn't show up on the FCC database, so it's likely issued from BoatUS. Another method of contacting for damage claims, directly with the insurnace company.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Another thing to consider, you can search for an MMSI with the FCC Ship License Search to find a persons name, and other details...
Yes, I had tried that, but it became clear that it was an unlicensed radio with BoatUS-supplied MMSI.

I've also searched the USCG documentation registry many times, but didn't think of it this time because I assumed the boat wasn't big enough to document. (Objects look smaller when traveling close to the speed of light. :p )

I think this thread is diverting to a useful purpose, which is to document the various ways one can look up a boat captain's identity. It my come in handy for when someone really does need to investigate a marine incident.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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After a few years now, navigating the ICW down South, I can count on one hand the times an irresponsible idiot has done something like this. The overwhelming majority of power boaters seem to be very good at making contact and doing a slow pass. It really is a pain for them and I'm always grateful and let them know it. Perhaps it's worth keeping a piece of old 2" polyethylene hawser, strategically dropped overboard for occasions such as this:) Only kidding....maybe.
 

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Nothing personal Take Five but coming from the powerboat crowd, I don't think I've seen a powerboat traveling at 26 knots toss up a 48" wake. Unless it's a big ass boat like Mike experienced.
You sure about the size of that wake :)
 

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Nothing personal Take Five but coming from the powerboat crowd, I don't think I've seen a powerboat traveling at 26 knots toss up a 48" wake. Unless it's a big ass boat like Mike experienced.
You sure about the size of that wake :)
Bayliners, searays, other power cruisers, Vikings, most sport fishing boats can do 26kts and throw a massive wake. I test drove a 42' Searay cruiser with two 450hp Caterpillars and it did close to 20 with wrong size props and a fouled bottom.

Even 23' wakeboard boats can throw close to that size wake at that speed.

Sent from my VS986 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Nope, not sure of anything. Too busy trying to react to get out a yardstick.

The essence of my point is unchanged by a few inches.

His bow was high, his stern dug in (not on a plane), and he was less than two boat lengths away from me, so no chance for the wake to damp out.
 
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After a few years now, navigating the ICW down South, I can count on one hand the times an irresponsible idiot has done something like this. The overwhelming majority of power boaters seem to be very good at making contact and doing a slow pass. It really is a pain for them and I'm always grateful and let them know it. Perhaps it's worth keeping a piece of old 2" polyethylene hawser, strategically dropped overboard for occasions such as this:) Only kidding....maybe.
Oh come one now !!!!!! if one gets severely waked on the AICW, 99% of the time its a New Jersey Boat and usually its a BIG 'sport fisher', ('cept JonEberg, of course). :-o
In NJ, its probably in their DNA to wake 'everyone and everything', especially in the NJ inlets - just like driving the ever-courteous NJ turnpike. Everyone there does this (including and especially the water cops); and therefore, a severe waking should be 'EXPECTED' anywhere near NJ.
So, its probably a widely accepted 'cultural thing' endemic to NJ.

This is Nih-Jezzey, Viva Yo!!!!!
(and where a middle finger salute is always optionally appropriate)
:eek

;-)
 

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S/V Wyndwitch - Morgan 24
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Oh come one now !!!!!! if one gets severely waked on the AICW, 99% of the time its a New Jersey Boat and usually its a BIG 'sport fisher', ('cept JonEberg, of course). :-o
In NJ, its probably in their DNA to wake 'everyone and everything', especially in the NJ inlets - just like driving the ever-courteous NJ turnpike. Everyone there does this (including and especially the water cops); and therefore, a severe waking should be 'EXPECTED' anywhere near NJ.
So, its probably a widely accepted 'cultural thing' endemic to NJ.

This is Nih-Jezzey, Viva Yo!!!!!
(and where a middle finger salute is always optionally appropriate)
:eek

;-)
Well, Jersey cant hog all the credit my fellow boaters on south shore Long. Island can be unbelievable. Sunday headin back in a north south cut I had several 26-34' powerboats over take me within 30' pulling most of the available water with them few slow down at all some slow down enough to maximize wake a few know their boats well enough to get on plane and bear off courteously. Two larger boats saw me clutching air horn and slowed down with a wave .Nice to know there are some who still know out there. As long as my sails are full I surf the first wave then bear up into the next trough. One time someone came within 18 ft in light air and I nearly broached onto the adjoining bar. Bloody people do not think.

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^well at least you get to practice your heavy weather skills for a few moments and then it's over...
 
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Rick,
I had an interesting conversation with a state water cop on Barnegat Bay a couple of seasons ago. A guy bought a new sport fishing boat on Forked River just up stream from our marina and was routinely throwing a two foot wake into all the docked boats downstream early every Sunday morning when he headed out. He would actually scream at back at the people on the dock that his boat "couldn't go any slower" and laugh as he was going by. At this point a couple of people had had minor damage.

The state cop told me they couldn't do anything because the incidents were taking place when they had no one on duty (don't ask). He said the procedure was to take down the boat's numbers, then go to the local PD and file a "reckless operation" complaint. The owner would then be compelled to show up in court, and if found guilty they'd be liable for any damages. The person swearing out the complaint would also be required to show up in court.

He said he'd mention it to one of the locals to have a chat with the guy. I assume he did because the waking stopped right after that.

Depending on how pissed you are and what side of the river it happened on, you might consider going to the local PD. But if Philly would have jurisdiction I don't think I'd waste my time.

Best of luck
Jim
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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Oh come one now !!!!!! if one gets severely waked on the AICW, 99% of the time its a New Jersey Boat and usually its a BIG 'sport fisher', ('cept JonEberg, of course). :-o
In NJ, its probably in their DNA to wake 'everyone and everything', especially in the NJ inlets - just like driving the ever-courteous NJ turnpike. Everyone there does this (including and especially the water cops); and therefore, a severe waking should be 'EXPECTED' anywhere near NJ.
So, its probably a widely accepted 'cultural thing' endemic to NJ.

This is Nih-Jezzey, Viva Yo!!!!!
(and where a middle finger salute is always optionally appropriate)
:eek

;-)
Nope, wrong. The last one I remember doing that was from Montauk. It WAS a 50'+ sportfisher. A Similar culture there on LI. Not all of LI, mind you, just from Manhattan to Montauk. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
...He said the procedure was to take down the boat's numbers, then go to the local PD and file a "reckless operation" complaint. The owner would then be compelled to show up in court, and if found guilty they'd be liable for any damages. The person swearing out the complaint would also be required to show up in court....Depending on how pissed you are and what side of the river it happened on, you might consider going to the local PD. But if Philly would have jurisdiction I don't think I'd waste my time...
Since there was no permanent damage I am not interested in getting the authorities involved. However, I am interested in all the responses that lay out the procedures for what to do if something happens in the future.

For the record, this happened very much on the Pennsylvania/Philadelphia side of the river. In fact, that's one of the odd things about his chosen path, because I was pretty far over near the Philly piers, and this guy had the whole river open on my port side. So he almost had to make a special effort to pass on my starboard side because he was so close to the bulkheads. In fact, it was so close that his wake reflected off the bulkheads back over to me after he passed me. (The reflections were nowhere near as high as the primary wake.)

One of the points of my original post was that when these guys are transmitting AIS, it's like they have a "radar gun" on themselves all the time. I think it could be valuable evidence for LEAs to use against them if someone presses charges.
 

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Freedom isn't free
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In NJ, its probably in their DNA to wake 'everyone and everything', especially in the NJ inlets - just like driving the ever-courteous NJ turnpike.
Rich I KNEW I liked you!

PS: Wife is from 'Jerrrrsee so I pick lightheartedly. We live in the Poconos, and we're pretty well convinced most of NYC comes to stay with us every weekend... Our area is a parking lot from 5pm to 9pm every Sunday night (people going home to NJ, or NY). By the way many of those from "out of state" also frequent our local lake where I have my boat. we have a max speed limit on the lake weekends of 45mph... and YES it's exceeded often, mostly by Lake Lice (I mean PWC).
 

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arrgh!
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I have a friend who works the summer patrolling an Adirondack Lake

I always like to go to breakfast with him in the fall, to hear his stories. Even with his boat identified as a 'patrol boat' people do crazy things right in front of him.

The stories kind of fall in several categories:

The person is renting a boat (wave runner usually) and thought --- what happens on vacation stays on vacation

Along the same lines: I'm a tourist, you have to accept what I do
Conversely: I live here, I can do what I want.

I paid $$$ for my boat and I will do what I want.

and generally speaking, all have some degree of alcohol involved.

=================================

There is a Gallagher joke where he thinks people should be given a rubber sticker gun when they drive a car (boat) and every time someone cuts you off or does something stupid you shoot a sticker dart to the bumper (stern) of the guy. Then if a police officer sees a car (boat) driving around with five darts on it, he just arrests the guy for being an ars*hole



 

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Hello Rick -
it is indeed a small ( and highly connected) world. A dark blue hulled motor vessel "The Tardis" slalomed through the traffic on the Sassafas River on July 5th. He was at the GYB fuel dock when our fleet joined the parade of boats heading home from the 4th of July fireworks.
A short time later I assumed he mistook the "end of 6 mph" marker for a starting gun. "The Tardis" (metal nameplate on the stern, cutout so you can see the neon/led glow of the guy who just almost ran you down) was not the only nor the worse offender.
Maybe some of those folks get their jollies from endangering others as they pass, I believe most are obnoxiously oblivious.
"The Tardis" blew by me probably about 60 - 80 feet to port with a four foot wake ( give or take an couple inches). Guess that is his signature move. I was more concerned for the folks in small runabouts, fishing and rowboats he was buzzing. Sadly if travelling at 20 plus knots he gets to rock a lot of boats.
A**wipe is far to kind a term for such an A**&#(*"*%> !
all the best
Brazen Article
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Denis,

That's the same guy. I vividly remember the navy blue hull, but he passed me too fast to see his transom. His vessel name came up on AIS, and also was verified by the MMSI database.

I was running OpenCPN at the time, which has a really nice plugin that records an entire stream of NMEA data (your boat, all other boats, plus depth, wind, and any other instrumentation). Then you can play it back later, showing all boat locations on the screen as they move relative to each other. It will even replicate any alarms that went off. Unfortunately, you need to set it to record ahead of time, and I didn't have time to do that. (There have been times in the past when saw an interesting flotilla approaching, or something similarly noteworthy, that caused me to turn on the record function).

However, I did have the presence of mind to save his cached AIS track a few minutes after he passed me (more frequent points than marinetraffic.com), and I also had captured my own GPS track. So I brought these up tonight to see if my recollections were accurate. I've overlaid the two tracks in the below pic. You can clearly see the little dodge maneuver I did to attempt to turn into his wake after he had passed me. You can also see in the blowup at the bottom that he passed me 16.3 meters away, which is 54 feet. So I was not exaggerating. I did apparently exaggerate his speed, though. I said 26 knots, which I saw that he was doing after he passed me (when I brought up the AIS target info). At the exact moment that he passed me, he was only doing 24.2 knots. I guess he must have slowed down for me. :eek



 
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