SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We just picked up a new 4 burner propane countertop stove and the instructions state it may not have a hose longer than 1.5 meters!
I've used and even installed plenty of propane stoves and every one had a hose longer than that, some longer than twenty feet.
Our propane tank locker is aft and the stove is about 16 feet away and we'll probably need around 20 feet for the install.
Can this be some sort of Chinese directions misprint (15 meters instead of 1.5) or could there be a valid reason for this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,380 Posts
I can't think of any reason why it matters. Pressure is pressure. I wouldn't hesitate if installed correctly.

Sent from my moto x4 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
525 Posts
I agree, doesn't matter. Pressure is unaffected by the length of the line, and as long as the diameter is the same or larger, volume delivered to the appliance won't be an issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,900 Posts
My boat came with hose. I would think the issue may be related to leaks and perhaps cracks or poor clamping... and vibration. Rubber does degrade and tubing is believed to maintain its integrity.

It's a good practice to replace hoses... engine hoses and I suppose the propane hose after some number of years... but how many years?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,184 Posts
We just picked up a new 4 burner propane countertop stove and the instructions state it may not have a hose longer than 1.5 meters!
I've used and even installed plenty of propane stoves and every one had a hose longer than that, some longer than twenty feet.
Our propane tank locker is aft and the stove is about 16 feet away and we'll probably need around 20 feet for the install.
Can this be some sort of Chinese directions misprint (15 meters instead of 1.5) or could there be a valid reason for this?
Suggest following the ABYC standards. If I recall correctly, they call for one, uninterrupted hose all the way to the tank. No metal tubing. They also specify the frequency of support clamps for the hose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,308 Posts
I agree, doesn't matter. Pressure is unaffected by the length of the line, and as long as the diameter is the same or larger, volume delivered to the appliance won't be an issue.
That is incorrect. When sizing gas lines we have to take into account the length of the run and how many bends or elbows there are. There IS pressure drop on long runs which can create problems and cause the appliance to be under fired. The longer runs require larger pipe to reduce the pressure drop.

Having said that, 1.5m seems awfully short. Perhaps they are referring to connecting disposable propane tanks?

Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,808 Posts
The gas appliance comes with a given size fitting and the flexible line that would fit the same size fitting would be to small if the line is over the 1.5 meter length. on a four burner you also have to consider how much gas is required if all four burners are used at the same time. most never use all the burners at the same time. besides the line size you have to consider the type and number of tanks that are used at the same time to have enough gas vapor to supply all four burners. propane also requires less tank head space in warm weather then it does in the cold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,582 Posts
....propane countertop stove....
What do you mean by countertop? Is this an installed countertop unit, or a portable unit. The later may be designed for different pressures and portable bottles.

Got a link or make/model to your unit?
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Yes. Pressure loss over length is real. Suggest you talk to the manufacturer before ignoring their requirements.

This one does not apply but if you search online you should be able to find a calculator for your size piping.
LPG friction/pressure loss calculator.
Well, assuming I'll be using about 2.5 gallons every two or three months on a 16 foot run, that table seems to leave me well below problem level.
Thanks for the info.
 

·
Always learning...
Joined
·
67 Posts
I have seen several references online stating a 1.5m recommended maximum length for a flexible hose connection to a hard feedline, in order to accommodate a gimballed installation. It seems this might be standard practice in some areas, but is not the recommendation of the ABYC. Perhaps this is the reason your documentation reads as it does?

Jonathan
 

·
Dirt Free
Joined
·
2,654 Posts
I have seen several references online stating a 1.5m recommended maximum length for a flexible hose connection to a hard feedline, in order to accommodate a gimballed installation. It seems this might be standard practice in some areas, but is not the recommendation of the ABYC. Perhaps this is the reason your documentation reads as it does?

Jonathan
No, ABYC A-1, Marine Liquified Petroleum (LPG) Gas Systems makes no reference to any length whatsoever, whether pipe, tube or hose are used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,900 Posts
Capta, I can't upload pdf's to this site but if you send an email to [email protected] I will respond with the ABYC LPG Standards.
You can save a PDF as a JPEG... at least in Bullzip which is a great alternative to Adobe who changed their financial model to a subscription. Bullzip is a single purchase. I switched and love it. Interface is intuitive and easy to pick up. basic version is free! Upgrade is not expensive.

FREE PDF Printer
 

·
Dirt Free
Joined
·
2,654 Posts
You can save a PDF as a JPEG... at least in Bullzip which is a great alternative to Adobe who changed their financial model to a subscription. Bullzip is a single purchase. I switched and love it. Interface is intuitive and easy to pick up. basic version is free! Upgrade is not expensive.

FREE PDF Printer
Thanks but I don't want any more software.

I tried saving a pdf as a jpeg (didn't know that could be done). It does work but I don't have the patience to upload 34 pages at one photo per page.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,308 Posts
Well, assuming I'll be using about 2.5 gallons every two or three months on a 16 foot run, that table seems to leave me well below problem level.

Thanks for the info.
You are only storing the propane in liquid form. When you use it on your appliances you are drawing vapor off the top of the tank. The regulator reduces that gas pressure to 11" wc, or about 0.4psi. Such low pressure is very sensitive to restriction and pressure drop. At the burner the appliance relies on gas velocity coming through the burner orifice to draw air in to mix with the gas. If pressure and flow are reduced at the burner it may not mix enough oxygen, and you end up with incomplete combustion, which will manifest as yellowish flame, and sooting on your pots. Incomplete combustion also produces carbon monoxide, which, of course, is not a good thing in an enclosed space.

Gas is not something to be trifled with. If you are not sure, consult a gas fitter.

Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
As noted above the pressure drop along a hose depends on the length and number of bends etc. in the hose. Another important factor is the inside diameter of the hose. Using a larger diameter hose will result in less pressure drop. A larger diameter hose that ends in a fitting that will attach directly to your stove might solve any pressure drop problem, should one occur. The trick might be finding one.
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top