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Discussion Starter #1
We have recently changed from electric cooking to propane. I am installing the new system with a fancy gizmo that will change tanks automatically and has gauges to tell us how much gas is in the tanks. It is also a regulator, see pic below.
Here in the islands, it is near impossible to get lay-down propane tanks so we picked up a couple of French tanks that fit in our propane locker. That system has the regulator built right into the tank/hose connection, see pic below. I already had a 10# alloy lay-down US tank.
Can I use both regulators, i.e. run out of the French tank through it's regulator and then through the fancy gizmo regulator and then to the stove? Yes there will be a solenoid in there too.
 

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Do you know what the outlet pressure is on the French regulator? As long as it's at or above 11" wc you should be able to daisy chain. However, the US regulator won't show you anything close to accurate for tank fill, and most likely won't automatically switch over. That type typically uses tank pressure as the force to activate the changeover valve. So, while I it can be done it probably won't get you what you want.

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Discussion Starter #3
Do you know what the outlet pressure is on the French regulator? As long as it's at or above 11" wc you should be able to daisy chain. However, the US regulator won't show you anything close to accurate for tank fill, and most likely won't automatically switch over. That type typically uses tank pressure as the force to activate the changeover valve. So, while I it can be done it probably won't get you what you want.

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Thank you.
No, I've no clue about the outlet pressure on the French regulator and have no idea where I'd get that info. Perhaps someone can help us with that. We're using the French one now and it works fine on the stove even with 4 burners going full blast.
Honestly, at this point I don't care about all those features and now I wish I hadn't gotten the fancy unit and down here, it's too late to find a US reg.
 

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I'm probably not totally following. If you're asking whether you can use one regulator (the French one?) to connect to the tank, then take it's output and put it into another regulator, I doubt that will work. The input on the other would be looking for higher pressure.

Personally, I would never want two tanks open at once, just like I don't open two fresh water tanks simultaneously. One leak empties both tanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm probably not totally following. If you're asking whether you can use one regulator (the French one?) to connect to the tank, then take it's output and put it into another regulator, I doubt that will work. The input on the other would be looking for higher pressure.

Personally, I would never want two tanks open at once, just like I don't open two fresh water tanks simultaneously. One leak empties both tanks.

You are correct, you missed the point.
I can't get gas out of the French tank w/o using their integral regulator, but I'd like to tie it into an American switching device which has it's own regulator, since I only have one US lay down tank and two French tanks which fit in the propane locker.
If I were to switch to the French tank, would having two regulators in line be a problem? I'm sure it's not common practice, but would it work?
It's not like I can just run out and buy something else, down here.
 
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The regulator on your French tank is likely putting out appliance pressure of 11"wc. The new regulator manifold you have is designed for an inlet pressure in the 100-200psi range. You cannot put the 2 regulators in series, because the inlet pressure to the 2nd regulator will be too low.

You will need to remove the old regulator and adapt a shut off valve and hose to the tank that allows you to pipe full tank pressure to your new manifold.

If you are not confident making such modifications to the tank, or don't have access to the required fittings, then you should delay your upgrade until you do.

That french tank looks pretty old and rusty. You should probably replace it when you have the opportunity anyway.

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Discussion Starter #7
The new regulator manifold you have is designed for an inlet pressure in the 100-200psi range.

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Not to be argumentative, but I have literally gone up on a hill top far from town with the propane guy in Turkey and poured the gas from a bigger cylinder into my 20# US cylinders using cobbled together hoses and hose clamps to pour the liquid propane. They worked just fine. Where would the 100+ psi come from?
 

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Not to be argumentative, but I have literally gone up on a hill top far from town with the propane guy in Turkey and poured the gas from a bigger cylinder into my 20# US cylinders using cobbled together hoses and hose clamps to pour the liquid propane. They worked just fine. Where would the 100+ psi come from?
Gas. Liquid propane is low pressure, but gaseous propane in a fixed volume is higher pressure. Think of a pressure cooker - you put liquid water in it at atmospheric pressure, but it becomes highly pressurized when that water becomes gas.

Mark
 

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...If I were to switch to the French tank, would having two regulators in line be a problem? I'm sure it's not common practice, but would it work? ...
...If you're asking whether you can use one regulator (the French one?) to connect to the tank, then take it's output and put it into another regulator, I doubt that will work. The input on the other would be looking for higher pressure. .....
If I missed it, I really missed it, because I thought I already answered that.

You could always give it a try to find out. Sounds like you don't have a choice. Personally, I'd rather change the connection between tanks manually. Swapping the regulator every so often is a pain, but not really the end of the world.
 

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Sorry I missed most of this discussion. I suggest you get 2 tanks... one being the spare/back up with one regulator. And switch it manually... it takes 10 minutes tops.

YES it will run out when you are using it to cook. Bummer. Not the end of the world.

Then refill the empty at your earliest convenience. One regulator, one solenoid w/ remote switch.

KISS
 

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Not to be argumentative, but I have literally gone up on a hill top far from town with the propane guy in Turkey and poured the gas from a bigger cylinder into my 20# US cylinders using cobbled together hoses and hose clamps to pour the liquid propane. They worked just fine. Where would the 100+ psi come from?
That is the pressure range that is expected inside a propane cylinder under normal circumstances.

"According to the national standards publication NFPA58, a propane tank with*20 pounds*(5 Gal) of gas at 70°F would have a pressure of 145 psi; at 90°F, pressure would increase to 180 psi; at 105°F, pressure continues to rise to 235 psi, and at 130°F, pressures of 315 psi would be reached."

Hose clamps on a barbed fitting is perfectly capable of holding that kind of pressure, provided the hose is rated for that pressure.

Of course when you are transferring propane from one tank to another the pressures equalize between the tanks, then the liquid transfers like pouring water. At that point you are relying purely on gravity to do the transferring. If it is a hot day the pressure in the tanks can be quite high.

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Gas. Liquid propane is low pressure, but gaseous propane in a fixed volume is higher pressure. Think of a pressure cooker - you put liquid water in it at atmospheric pressure, but it becomes highly pressurized when that water becomes gas.



Mark
Liquid propane is not low pressure. The only reason it remains in liquid form is BECAUSE it is under pressure. At atmospheric pressure propane boils at -42°C.

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Discussion Starter #13
Sorry I missed most of this discussion. I suggest you get 2 tanks... one being the spare/back up with one regulator. And switch it manually... it takes 10 minutes tops.

YES it will run out when you are using it to cook. Bummer. Not the end of the world.

Then refill the empty at your earliest convenience. One regulator, one solenoid w/ remote switch.

KISS
Yep, if I were in Westchester I'd just run out and pick up a lay down tank and anything else I needed.
I'm not, and even worse I'm stuck in this damn pandemic. Therefor, I'm trying to make do with what I have, 'cause I'm not going to get anything else any time soon.
 

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Yep, if I were in Westchester I'd just run out and pick up a lay down tank and anything else I needed.
I'm not, and even worse I'm stuck in this damn pandemic. Therefor, I'm trying to make do with what I have, 'cause I'm not going to get anything else any time soon.
Do you have access to any hardware? Where do you get your gas refills from?

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Discussion Starter #15
Where do you get your gas refills from?

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We pay a guy ec$5.00 to put them on the ferry to Grenada and they get filled down there and then returned to the boat.
There are a few hardware stores here, but they about equal one aisle of hardware items in an Ace hardware in the US.
 

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We pay a guy ec$5.00 to put them on the ferry to Grenada and they get filled down there and then returned to the boat.

There are a few hardware stores here, but they about equal one aisle of hardware items in an Ace hardware in the US.
That is a challenge!

I am not familiar with the type of fitting on your tanks, and it is impossible to tell without removing the regulator. You need to identify the connection type, and then you should be able to get an adapter hose made up and shipped to you. It might get a bit expensive though!

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That is a challenge!

I am not familiar with the type of fitting on your tanks, and it is impossible to tell without removing the regulator. You need to identify the connection type, and then you should be able to get an adapter hose made up and shipped to you. It might get a bit expensive though!

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Thanks, but I think I have my answer and I'm just going to have to find a work around w/o trying to import anything at this time.
I do appreciate your information about the pressures, etc. That will help.
 

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A bit off topic, but I recently spent a week aboard a mate's 34 footer built in the late 1970's, with a gas bottle in a drained locker at the back of the cockpit which had to be turned on at the bottle every time you wanted to use the stove (2 burner plus oven plus grill on gimbals). There was a big notice in the galley saying turn gas off at bottle when not using stove.
I can't tell you how nice it was to have such a simple system with no electrics involved anywhere. The inconvenience of having to turn the gas on and off at the bottle each time, was an absolute joy in relation to the security it gave.
I'm going back to it in my own boat! Simplicity is what I crave most of all these days.
 

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No gas detector in the cabin.
That’s where the stove and burners are. A leak in there from the hose or fitting will blow up the boat.
Not very safe I think. Please reconsider.😀
 

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Yep, if I were in Westchester I'd just run out and pick up a lay down tank and anything else I needed.
I'm not, and even worse I'm stuck in this damn pandemic. Therefor, I'm trying to make do with what I have, 'cause I'm not going to get anything else any time soon.
I am a bit confused. Why can't you use a single tank... which you presumably have... add a solenoid controlled from galley and use your present regulator. When that tank is empty remove it and connect the spare???

My drained propane locker has only room for one 10# tank. The spare 10# tank lives in the anchor locker which is also drained. It's not a hell of a lot of capacity... but I've never run out of propane. As soon as do the switch which take 10 minutes... re fill is on my to do list.

Yes where I am not it is easy to get a refill. I can also use the small 1# tanks as emergency spares... and when I kept then they lived on the shelf in the propane locker.
 

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