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I mean, it's not like I've ever just gone out and felt the temperature of a propane system solenoid. They work, or they don't, right?
Well, the other day while changing from one bottle to another while cooking and happened to feel that the solenoid was hot. Too hot to hang onto.
I understand what a solenoid does and how it works, but how hot does yours get or how hot do you think it should get? Let's not get into wiring, that's well done and the voltage is way sufficient.
Thanks
 

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I have never checked my propane solenoid temperature specifically, but I can tell you that solenoid coils in general do get quite warm. If you take a solenoid coil off the valve stem and energize it, it can actually burn out.

Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
 

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Yes, they get hot as a rule. That sounds hotter than normal, but do you ever shut it off? If not, heat creates resistance, which causes more heat rather than work. Good to give them a rest.
 

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Yes, they get hot as a rule. That sounds hotter than normal, but do you ever shut it off? If not, heat creates resistance, which causes more heat rather than work. Good to give them a rest.
It is only on when the stove is in use.
 

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Yes, they get hot as a rule. That sounds hotter than normal, but do you ever shut it off? If not, heat creates resistance, which causes more heat rather than work. Good to give them a rest.
Actually, quite the opposite. At a constant voltage, as the resistance goes up, the current falls. As the current falls, the power (wattage) falls and the solenoid produces less heat. 100W light bulbs have a lower resistance than 40W light bulbs. 100W bulbs pass more current.

All that said, the propane solenoid operated valves do get hot. They draw about an amp and at 12V that is 12W. You know how hot a 1A incandescent bulb gets. Touch one and you burn your fingers. Your solenoid has a little more surface area and loses a little more heat to the air, so it is not quite as hot.

Bill
 

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Thanks all.
 

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Just another reminder to turn it off whenever the stove is off. Not only getting hot, but sucking amps needlessly.
There's a bright red light on the panel that is on when the breaker is, so that's easily done, even in day light.
 

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I recently inspected the propane system on a Cabo Rico. That solenoid ran uncomfortably hot to the touch. The system functioned normally.
 

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Actually, quite the opposite. At a constant voltage, as the resistance goes up, the current falls. As the current falls, the power (wattage) falls and the solenoid produces less heat. 100W light bulbs have a lower resistance than 40W light bulbs. 100W bulbs pass more current....

While you are correct in stating that an increase in resistance causes a decrease in current with constant voltage, in this situation, there is more to the story because the voltage is not necessarily constant.

When you consider that the solenoid & the wires going to it, actually constitute a resister network, due to the resistance of the wires, you will see that as the resistance of the solenoid goes up, so does the percentage of voltage across it. Since power can be calculated as (Vsquared)/R, there is also the increased voltage across the coil to consider. The squared increase in voltage will fight against the decreased current due to the increase in resistance to determine the power consumed in the solenoid. Depending on the resistance of the wiring in the system, the power dissipated by the solenoid coil may go in either direction as it gets hot. Actual measurements would need to be taken to determine the case in this particular installation.

V=IR
I=V/R
R=V/I

P=IV
P=VV/R
P=IIR
 

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Thanks all. One more job that didn't need doing.
 
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