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S/V Calypso
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife and I are going to spend a week on our 22' windrose in September. Any suggestions on how to pack a week's worth of food on a small boat would be VERY useful!
 

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islander bahama 24
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In the summer...Before heading out for a few days or more...I'll make a batch of cold salads..Macaroni salad, potato salad..but you can get as fancy as you want. They will hold up for a few days...A seafood salad of some kind is always on the list..conch, scungilli, calamari, shrimp..etc.

I happen to like cold chicken...so I just cook a bunch of thighs on the grill wrap them individually and seal them in a gallon size freezer bag.

Lot's of fruit, cheese, crackers and salami..or pepperoni..wine, beer...
 

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On our boat, with a combination of block ice and cubes, I know we can go two and a half days before we need to replenish and that's if I make John keep his beer in a separate cooler. Unless you're planning to live on canned meat and vegetables, will you stop anywhere for ice?
 

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S/V Calypso
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oh yes, fresh ice will be a every other day thing I expect. There are plenty of marinas to get at least ice. The problem we face around here, is a lack of curtsy cars/close by stores.
 

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As long as you have ice and decent coolers, that's half the battle. I try to plan meals where the leftovers can be used for lunch the next day. For example, if I grill a London broil for dinner, for lunch the next day I'll slice it thin and put it with arugula, sliced onions, and a Greek yogurt/spice sauce in a wrap. The packages of tuna are easy to store and go a long way. Wraps are easier to store than a loaf of bread and don't get smooshed. We can make a meal out of guacamole and good quality chips like Stacy's. Nothing there that needs refrigeration.

Also helps to pack the cooler/ice box so that you put what you're going to eat soonest on top. That way you can get in and out quickly. I store onions, garlic, and any fruits and vegetables that don't need refrigeration in those little hammocks.

For breakfast I keep it simple. Yogurt and fresh fruit and/or granola.
 

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Make a menu plan ahead of time.. Do not figure on three squares a day; you'll be busy sailing ;) Figure a hi-carb, hearty. b-fast, snacks and fruit for lunch on the fly and a simple evening meal. Allowextra water/fluids during the trip. Stay hydrated, as being out and in tthe wind/sun will dry you out.
We recently have tried Hormel completes (?) . they have a huge variety and are shelf stable. Keep it simple and easy. You don;t hav a bunch of roomfor culinary experimentation or gastronomical extravaganzas, so concentrate on sailing and then resting when you can. Use ice allotment for beverages and possibly fruit.. Leave home-prepped foods and stuff for day sails and. weekend parties/picnics.mebbe first night out sorta thang
All you need should (probably) fit in two store bags, plus water. We *always* take too much and end up bringing a lot home. You hafta figure out if you wanna "sail-to-eat" or. .eat-to-sail" ;)
 

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My wife and I are going to spend a week on our 22' windrose in September. Any suggestions on how to pack a week's worth of food on a small boat would be VERY useful!
First question is: do you really need a week's worth of food? Are there any grocery stores along your route? If so bring along dry goods, but purchase meat, dairy, and produce along the way. If your trip is a week long you'll need to restock on ice at least once. I add about 8 lbs of ice to our cooler every other day, primarily using block ice if possible. This leaves plenty of reserve and we can go for 4 days without adding ice if necessary.

Repacking food into ziplock-style bags saves a lot of room. This is also essential to keep stuff mostly dry in the cooler, otherwise it will go swimming and get wet. Bags also save a lot of room on anything in a cardboard box, like cereal, rice (boxed risotto kits make a nice side), pasta, etc.

Figure out portions ahead of time for some meals, it makes them faster to make and takes less space. For instance we like to make pancakes about once a week while cruising, and just pour a day's worth of pancake ingredients into a bag and store that instead of bringing along the whole box.

I keep a couple of days of freeze dried camping food on the boat as a backup just in case we go longer than expected between stops.

Produce (and other food) stores nicely in small gear hammocks that take up otherwise unused space along the gunwales of the cabin.

Enjoy the trip! I just came back from a 16 day trip and I already miss it.
 

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S/V Calypso
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Unfortunately, being stuck in an inland lake, stores are generally pretty far from the marinas. To answer your question, we probably don't need to pack a week's food. We could always return to the marina and our car. One other possibility I'm considering is talking to a marina further away from ours to see if we can keep a car there, and maybe overnight to charge up the batteries and re-provision.

My goal is to be as self sufficient as possible given our limitations (boat size, access to stores on foot, etc...)
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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My wife and I are going to spend a week on our 22' windrose in September. Any suggestions on how to pack a week's worth of food on a small boat would be VERY useful!
Excellent. The heat of summer should be past so in addition to being generally more pleasant your ice will last longer.

I looked at the layout of your Windrose 24 on sailboatdata.com. I couldn't read all the markings so I'm not completely sure what everything is. For example I can't tell what is forward of the cooker on the starboard side. I also couldn't tell if there is a built-in icebox. Am I correct in assuming that you sleep in the v-berth?

I would slide a couple of coolers under the dinette. Pack one for the first half of the trip and the other for the second. Freeze everything for the second cooler as hard as you can, add block ice, and use duct tape to secure it closed. Wrap it with a blanket for additional insulation. In three-ish days open it up, drain it, and add new ice. When you are packing the coolers fill any empty space with pre-chilled--preferably frozen--water.

When the first cooler is empty you can use it for dry storage, including trash if necessary. Get trash and recycling off the boat at any opportunity. Fill the boat water tanks any time you have a chance.

Gallon jugs of water can go between the two coolers under the dinette. You may want to tape a 1x2 between the coolers to keep the water jugs from shifting around. Keep an eye on the jugs - chafe can lead to pinholes and you can lose all your water.

Milk crates make great storage for dry goods and cans. Those can go on the dinette seats. They should be tied to something outboard to keep them off the cabin sole.

A small cooler in the cockpit makes sense for drinks for the day.

If you do have an icebox in the galley that would make a great place to use as a cooler (not so much ice) for fresh fruit and veg.

There is a lot of material on SailNet and elsewhere about provisioning. It can get overwhelming.

If you sleep on the dinette use the v-berth for storage.

This approach means eating in the cockpit. If it rains you stand below. *grin* Sorry.

As long as you have ice and decent coolers, that's half the battle. I try to plan meals where the leftovers can be used for lunch the next day. For example, if I grill a London broil for dinner, for lunch the next day I'll slice it thin and put it with arugula, sliced onions, and a Greek yogurt/spice sauce in a wrap.
Definitely a good idea to plan for leftovers. Chicken on the grill leads to chicken salad. Pork loin leftovers go on a sandwich and/or faux barbeque. If you boil pasta or make rice you can hard cook eggs for egg salad. Think ahead. It doesn't really help your storage any but it makes shopping and cooking easier.

You know your eating patterns better than we do so plan based on how you eat. When cruising we usually alternate big breakfast days (and a later start) with lighter ones like those Donna espouses for an early start. We usually do some prep ahead at night and in the morning and eat lunch underway. Some days we have finger food (sort of an extended happy hour) for dinner. Open a bunch of cans and jars, slice some dried meat and cheese and dinner is ready. Leftovers go into salads and sometimes omelets.

I store onions, garlic, and any fruits and vegetables that don't need refrigeration in those little hammocks.
I have not had good luck with hammocks. Even slung transversely I found apples turned into sauce and oranges into juice. Onions were just a mess. I use hammocks for clothes, books, and other odds and ends. Maybe my experience is due to being an offshore guy and it wouldn't be so bad inshore. Still, I don't put soft foods in hammocks. YMMV.

I do use rectangular baskets on the galley counter for onions and garlic and fruit for the day. That may not work for you on 24 foot boat.

Unfortunately, being stuck in an inland lake, stores are generally pretty far from the marinas.
Do you have Peapod or some other grocery delivery service? Maybe you could have fresh fruit and veg delivered to a marina on day 3 or 4.

Have a great cruise.
 

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islander bahama 24
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A weeks food isn't really that much. Track what you eat at home in a weeks time and that will give you an idea what to pack. Freeze all the meats and pre cool the ice box
 

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We tend to eat far less when on the boat. Start making note of how much you throw away/take home with you at the ends of your trips however long.
 
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S/V Calypso
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Donna, I think you hit one of the issues we have right on the head. We tend to over cook, and have left overs. I'd love to avoid this unless we can re-use it the next day. On the other hand you can't have too much rum on board.
 

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Reuse what you can of the melted ice water, keep it clean (i.e no loose cubes) and it can wash dishes. Keep it real clean and you can drink it. There should be no loose (non-zippy bagged) food in the cooler.
For a week storage of drinking stuff (whether water, mixers or Rum) can be a real issue - you are going to need 2 gallons a day of potable water.
Ignore heavy food like steaks, keep to white meats and you will be surprised at the availability of canned stuff - chicken, turkey and of course tuna; all of which can be bought in bag form as well.
Personally, fresh stuff is not a priority for me, too many years in the Navy where it ran out on day 4 or so, I got used to canned.
 

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S/V Calypso
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Being an old backpacker, freeze dried wouldn't be my first choice. Although they got better, they still aren't all that pleasing textural wise.
 

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I find that I snack through lunch, since that is a lot easier to do while sailing. So I bring along more snack foods while sailing (hummus and carrots, chips and salsa, fruit, yogurt) and less lunch food.

We try not to make enough to have leftovers, but do sometimes stick leftovers in the cooler and eat them later.

For my last trip my wife made a large batch of nice potato salad that we kept in the cooler and could use as a side or quick snack. That was pretty handy.

If you are on a fresh water lake that is clean I'd just bring a backpacking water filter. The gravity filters that MSR and Platypus make are very easy to use and work great. If the lake is polluted from agricultural runoff then I wouldn't filter and drink the water.

If you can get ice every day you can probably source water as well. We use about 5-8 gallons of fresh water per day (total for 2 adults) when we aren't being too frugal, 2-3 when we are being careful. We do drink the water out of our fresh water system, while some other friends keep a separate bottled water supply for drinking water.

I'm vegetarian and the selection of freeze dried backpacking food for vegetarians is small but pretty good. The best ones are either pasta based (which makes them overpriced but easy to make) or make good fillings for tortillas. Mixing them in a tortilla with some fresh produce (or probably meat) and turning it into a burrito of sorts can make them pretty tasty.
 
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