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· Mermaid Hunter
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My wife and I are going to spend a week on our 22' windrose in September. Any suggestions on how to pack a week's worth of food on a small boat would be VERY useful!
Excellent. The heat of summer should be past so in addition to being generally more pleasant your ice will last longer.

I looked at the layout of your Windrose 24 on sailboatdata.com. I couldn't read all the markings so I'm not completely sure what everything is. For example I can't tell what is forward of the cooker on the starboard side. I also couldn't tell if there is a built-in icebox. Am I correct in assuming that you sleep in the v-berth?

I would slide a couple of coolers under the dinette. Pack one for the first half of the trip and the other for the second. Freeze everything for the second cooler as hard as you can, add block ice, and use duct tape to secure it closed. Wrap it with a blanket for additional insulation. In three-ish days open it up, drain it, and add new ice. When you are packing the coolers fill any empty space with pre-chilled--preferably frozen--water.

When the first cooler is empty you can use it for dry storage, including trash if necessary. Get trash and recycling off the boat at any opportunity. Fill the boat water tanks any time you have a chance.

Gallon jugs of water can go between the two coolers under the dinette. You may want to tape a 1x2 between the coolers to keep the water jugs from shifting around. Keep an eye on the jugs - chafe can lead to pinholes and you can lose all your water.

Milk crates make great storage for dry goods and cans. Those can go on the dinette seats. They should be tied to something outboard to keep them off the cabin sole.

A small cooler in the cockpit makes sense for drinks for the day.

If you do have an icebox in the galley that would make a great place to use as a cooler (not so much ice) for fresh fruit and veg.

There is a lot of material on SailNet and elsewhere about provisioning. It can get overwhelming.

If you sleep on the dinette use the v-berth for storage.

This approach means eating in the cockpit. If it rains you stand below. *grin* Sorry.

As long as you have ice and decent coolers, that's half the battle. I try to plan meals where the leftovers can be used for lunch the next day. For example, if I grill a London broil for dinner, for lunch the next day I'll slice it thin and put it with arugula, sliced onions, and a Greek yogurt/spice sauce in a wrap.
Definitely a good idea to plan for leftovers. Chicken on the grill leads to chicken salad. Pork loin leftovers go on a sandwich and/or faux barbeque. If you boil pasta or make rice you can hard cook eggs for egg salad. Think ahead. It doesn't really help your storage any but it makes shopping and cooking easier.

You know your eating patterns better than we do so plan based on how you eat. When cruising we usually alternate big breakfast days (and a later start) with lighter ones like those Donna espouses for an early start. We usually do some prep ahead at night and in the morning and eat lunch underway. Some days we have finger food (sort of an extended happy hour) for dinner. Open a bunch of cans and jars, slice some dried meat and cheese and dinner is ready. Leftovers go into salads and sometimes omelets.

I store onions, garlic, and any fruits and vegetables that don't need refrigeration in those little hammocks.
I have not had good luck with hammocks. Even slung transversely I found apples turned into sauce and oranges into juice. Onions were just a mess. I use hammocks for clothes, books, and other odds and ends. Maybe my experience is due to being an offshore guy and it wouldn't be so bad inshore. Still, I don't put soft foods in hammocks. YMMV.

I do use rectangular baskets on the galley counter for onions and garlic and fruit for the day. That may not work for you on 24 foot boat.

Unfortunately, being stuck in an inland lake, stores are generally pretty far from the marinas.
Do you have Peapod or some other grocery delivery service? Maybe you could have fresh fruit and veg delivered to a marina on day 3 or 4.

Have a great cruise.
 

· Mermaid Hunter
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try not to open the chest any more than absolutely necessary.
Agree. This may have come up before. I keep a small cooler for daily drinks and snacks that need to be keep cool and a snack bag under the companionway ladder. This minimizes the number of times the refrigerator or main cooler have to be opened. In addition to saving energy (refrigerator) and ice (cooler) it keeps crew from rummaging through my fridge and pantry and eating things I planned for a meal. *grin*
 

· Mermaid Hunter
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Does anyone have a particular type of cooler they like above all others?
Yeti. I had an Igloo before that lived on the boat. I replaced hinges, latches, and handles over and over. When the case failed due to UV we bought a Yeti. It cost a lot but not as much as the Igloo plus all the repairs. No failures, and ice lasts 50 - 75% longer.
 

· Mermaid Hunter
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I looked at the Yeti but haven't decided if its worth the cost.
That was my point - I spent more on an Igloo and handles and hinges and latches over four years than the cost of a Yeti which has required zero maintenance or repair.
 
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