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On water.........

While I have yet to source a filter for nasty water. I do have an under-=sink cartridge type in line with the tank feed. We etnd to use bottled water and keepa supply aboard.
Last weekend it rained right hard for about an hour. I ended up dumping near to 30 gallons out n of the 8' dink! I don't believe I'llworry about water sources too much..simply turn the dink right-side-up on deck and set a siphon to fill the tank :D
 

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As long as you have ice and decent coolers, that's half the battle. I try to plan meals where the leftovers can be used for lunch the next day. For example, if I grill a London broil for dinner, for lunch the next day I'll slice it thin and put it with arugula, sliced onions, and a Greek yogurt/spice sauce in a wrap. The packages of tuna are easy to store and go a long way. Wraps are easier to store than a loaf of bread and don't get smooshed. We can make a meal out of guacamole and good quality chips like Stacy's. Nothing there that needs refrigeration.

Also helps to pack the cooler/ice box so that you put what you're going to eat soonest on top. That way you can get in and out quickly. I store onions, garlic, and any fruits and vegetables that don't need refrigeration in those little hammocks.

For breakfast I keep it simple. Yogurt and fresh fruit and/or granola.
You just made my mouth water. :D
 

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Try MRE's. You can get a case (12 meals) of them for around 55 bucks. But be careful, you can get fat on them. Each meal is 2500 calories. During Desert Storm, my loader on my tank was eating three a day and gained 20 pounds.
 

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I gettum for just over two bux ata Wally Worldprrtty hi in salt; but ya need that in the heat anyways.
Careful with MRE. They can bind ya up tighter thanna frogs butt ;)lotsa water for either.
I mix it up with canned, preserved and packaged. Add some fresh as available and yer GTG
 

· S/V Calypso
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I've eaten a few MREs backpacking. You are absolutely correct about high calories! I happen to favor the spaghetti one. Had one that had some kind of ham stuff and wasn't happy.

Binding up isn't a bad thing when you don't have a real head!
 

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You can survive a week without cooking but if you have time, why not cook on boat or on shore? It can be fun if you have some basic gear. I find preparing food while camping or on boat to be a fun activity. Rice and beans are easy to make, so are thick soups using canned and fresh ingredients. When out there I try to prepare the same things I make at home, as I make simple meals. Make sure you have plenty of drinkable/cooking water. For 2 people you will likely need at least 15 gallons per week.
 

· S/V Calypso
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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
My wife and I both love to cook. Just trying to figure out the whole space vs time issue on the smaller boats. We both are avid campers but can just hop in the car to go to the store. Not so easy around here on the water.
 

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I've eaten a few MREs backpacking. You are absolutely correct about high calories! I happen to favor the spaghetti one. Had one that had some kind of ham stuff and wasn't happy.

Binding up isn't a bad thing when you don't have a real head!
My fave was beans in tomato sauce heck I even still have my p38 from c rats
 

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My wife and I both love to cook. Just trying to figure out the whole space vs time issue on the smaller boats. We both are avid campers but can just hop in the car to go to the store. Not so easy around here on the water.
Plenty of time to cook out on the hook and as far as storage of the foods I have a years worth on my 24 ft islander (canned and freeze dried) and if you eat fish there's a couple fresh dinners right there in addition to relaxing activity.
 

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My wife and I both love to cook. Just trying to figure out the whole space vs time issue on the smaller boats. We both are avid campers but can just hop in the car to go to the store. Not so easy around here on the water.
At times I cook over a fire on shore, but I also have a one burner setup on my 20 ft boat (I mostly use my small pressure cooker). I usually cook in the cockpit. More room and more air.
 

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Provisioning for a week on a 22' boat starts with: how much are you going to cook?
If the answer is a lot... then make a menu, consider what other posters said about making things last through more than one meal, get lots of snacks, LOTS of drinking water. We always made a thermos of hot water last thing at night; it stays hot enough to make tea or coffee in the morning. Dry ingredients (pasta, minute rice, instant mashed potatoes) are your friend. I sailed a Tanzer 22 with no grill, nothing but a one burner gimbaled stove and we did fine; I remember being on the dock in St James, MI, with fresh made clam spaghetti (can of clams / garlic / spaghetti / olive oil — nothing that needed cold).
On the other hand, if you are NOT going to cook...
make meals ahead of time and freeze them, follow the suggestion about two coolers. Spaghetti, macaroni and cheese, chicken casseroles all free hard. Add fresh salad and it's dinner and the salad will keep for a few days at least.
 

· S/V Calypso
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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Thank you all for such great suggestions!
 

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Add to Pendragon's list dried pulses or canned.

One of my favorites at home is:
food com /recipe/curry-potato-lentil-soup-478411 Curry Potato Lentil Soup Recipe - Food.com

You could even use canned potatoes if you altered the cooking method and you could use a pressure cooker for it also.

Veggi chilli with various dried or canned beans wouldnt be too hard to do in a pressure cooker also.
 

· Don't call me a "senior"!
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One thing I do to keep things in an ice chest stay chilled longer is to freeze as much of the provisions beforehand as possible. For example, I put meat and marinade in gallon freezer bags (double bagged) and let it freeze good and solid for at least a couple of days before a trip, and/or I freeze bags of soup/stew in a similar fashion. This essentially doubles the amount of "ice" in the chest. Everything that can't be actually frozen, but should be kept cold, I chill as much as possible. I also use well-rinsed gallon milk jugs to freeze water; three gallons is just about 20 lbs of ice. That way as the ice melts it doesn't flood the bottom of the ice chest with water, and tends to keep a bit longer. As the ice chest contents start to thaw I just use the most defrosted bags first (usually the stuff on top), and try not to open the chest any more than absolutely necessary. Stuff that doesn't really need to be chilled (eggs, bread, butter, even beer!) I leave out of the ice chest. I full week is probably pushing it a bit, but I can usually get at least five days before the ice is gone but everything is still pretty cold.
 

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try not to open the chest any more than absolutely necessary.
Agree. This may have come up before. I keep a small cooler for daily drinks and snacks that need to be keep cool and a snack bag under the companionway ladder. This minimizes the number of times the refrigerator or main cooler have to be opened. In addition to saving energy (refrigerator) and ice (cooler) it keeps crew from rummaging through my fridge and pantry and eating things I planned for a meal. *grin*
 

· S/V Calypso
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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Does anyone have a particular type of cooler they like above all others?
 

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Does anyone have a particular type of cooler they like above all others?
When we had the 22 I bought an Igloo Ice Cube. It's more vertical than horizontal and took up less berth space. It also fit nicely in the middle of the boat between the berths for use as a table, has cup holders built into the lid, and inside trays at the top to keep stuff like the cheese and salamis and whatnot out of the way of the melting ice.

It also closes snuggly so there's no flappy thing on the outside that snaps shut. We have another cooler with a thing that snaps shut that got caught on a door or something while open and broke off. That cooler is now used only at home for parties since it won't close securely.

The Ice Cube is still my primary cooler for the boat and now used for beer to keep a certain person (who once rummaged around at night in the dark for a beer and left the steaks out on the counter in 90 degrees when he forgot to return them) out of the boat's ice box.
 

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Does anyone have a particular type of cooler they like above all others?
Yeti. I had an Igloo before that lived on the boat. I replaced hinges, latches, and handles over and over. When the case failed due to UV we bought a Yeti. It cost a lot but not as much as the Igloo plus all the repairs. No failures, and ice lasts 50 - 75% longer.
 

· S/V Calypso
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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Yeti. I had an Igloo before that lived on the boat. I replaced hinges, latches, and handles over and over. When the case failed due to UV we bought a Yeti. It cost a lot but not as much as the Igloo plus all the repairs. No failures, and ice lasts 50 - 75% longer.
I looked at the Yeti but haven't decided if its worth the cost.
 
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