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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ahoy all,
I am considering mounting a Mystic Marine Foldaway ladder adjacent to a boarding gate on my, new to me, 1990 PS 37. I'm planning on using the track mount configuration, as there appears to be enough track forward of the gate to allow for a proper fit.
My question is about the correct length of the ladder. I understand that two steps should be in the water, when deployed, to allow for comfortable egress. The boat is not near me right now, so I am unable to measure the freeboard. Would anyone know the approximate distance from the caprail to the waterline in the area of a boarding gate? I'd like to know if a 48" ladder is long enough, or will I need to go up to the next size, which is 70".
Thanks,
Bill
 

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Crealock 37
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I have a folding ladder that hangs from the track at the gate on my 37, I don't know for sure how long it is but I'm sure it isn't 70 inches long and it does have two steps in the water....48 inches sounds about right. Folded it is shorter than the mast pulpit.
 

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We also have a Tops in Quality boarding ladder. I just went looking for their web site

White Water Marine

but it now brings me to White Water Marine. There I can find the measuring guide for a midships ladder.

http://www.whitewatermarineinc.com/docs/amidship-ladder-guide.pdf

I got the three section one with teak treads ten years ago and have been happy with it. Having three sections put enough of the ladder in the water to make it easy to climb although the joint at the top of the third (lowest) section can be a pinch point when climbing the ladder. The teak treads are much more comfortable than the round ss tubing. I sized it so the standoff feet rest on the teak rub rail rather than on the painted hull. I also made a telescoping assembly of 1" and 7/8" ss tubing with a ss spring inside and pins sticking out at each end that fit in the holes half way down in the forward and aft sides of the gate. When in place it makes a better thing to tie the folded ladder to when underway than the top lifeline. We also bought two sets of the mounts that go on the sail track and keep one on each side of the boat so we can easily move the ladder from one side to the other.

The ladder does not usually bother the lead block for the genoa which is normally aft of the gate. But, sailing downwind with the whisker pole out on the ladder side, it would be nice to be able to move the lead block forward of the ladder to keep the genoa sheet pulled in and the genoa clew against the whisker pole end.

We have had some corrosion of the submerged welds, but aside from the pinch point mentioned above, no other problems.

Bill Murdoch
1988 PSC 34
Irish Eyes
 

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Mondofromredondo
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I just recently purchased the Mystic stainless boarding ladder for my PSC 34.

I ordered their longest length which I believe was 72".
I'm so glad I did because it makes getting upright on the ladder from the water so much easier. Imagine the first rung of your ladder sits 15 -20" below waterline. when your in the water your feet are a good 35-45" under the waterline. The 48" would make it hard to simply go from floating position to standing position. Take my word for it. The 72" is the way to go. Pay now or pay later. You won't regret getting the 72"
Plus the older and fatter you are the more you'll appreciate the 72" because you become less flexible, less strength in those legs at the extreme angle of trying to lift you foot up to your waist and stand from that position. Plus your going to be wet and tired from swimming.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all for the great information. I appreciate it very much.
I think the 70" length will be right for me.
I'm 60 years old and though I'm in pretty good shape, I like the idea of the added length below the water.
I think Bill's comment about having mounts on both sides is particularly helpful as I would like the flexibility of easily moving a ladder to either side of the boat.
I had thought about the genoa sheet block issue and would consider mounting additional blocks/cars forward of the ladder mounts for the times I would need more forward sheeting. Easy enough to re-lead the sheets, then.
Thanks again,
Bill
 

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Crealock 37
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676 Posts
When underway I lash the ladder to the mast pulpit which allows me to slide the mounts all the way forward on the track…only lose about 6-8 inches of track.
 

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Thank you all for the great information. I appreciate it very much.

I think the 70" length will be right for me.

I'm 60 years old and though I'm in pretty good shape, I like the idea of the added length below the water.

I think Bill's comment about having mounts on both sides is particularly helpful as I would like the flexibility of easily moving a ladder to either side of the boat.

I had thought about the genoa sheet block issue and would consider mounting additional blocks/cars forward of the ladder mounts for the times I would need more forward sheeting. Easy enough to re-lead the sheets, then.

Thanks again,

Bill
I found when I mounted my similar ladder at the gate that the genoa sheet would frequently hang on it.
The ladder's home while underway is on the mast side of the port mast pulpit.
I also added a couple of feet of track at the forward end of the track to position the ladder a bit further forward then otherwise possible. The ladder tack cars reside there when not being used.

Mar Hall
www.svcrazyfish.com
 

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Mondofromredondo
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Something to consider when choosing the ladder location as I learned when picking up a shoreboat. Shoreboats often do not want to pull along the side your boat that has an overhanging BBQ attatched to the rails.
That being said in some instances you arrive at a marina and really don't feel the need to deploy the boarding ladder as your not planning on going into the water. If thats so then you would be short of one boarding location to the boat as the ladder is taking up that space. The practical thing in this instance as I've found is mount the ladder on the same side of the boat as your overhaning BBQ. If you have the BBQ on one side and u mount the ladder on the other side you may have no easy and convenient way to access the shore boat.
 

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s/v Pelagic
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76 Posts
We've had the 70" Mystic ladder installed for about 15 years and are pleased with it. It's on the forward end of the port side genoa track (BBQ side). (On older C37's this track ends about 10 inches aft of the gate so that's where the ladder is.) The longer ladder works well for us.

In an emergency we want to be able to use the ladder to get back on board. To this end we have a line attached to the bottom rung (on top when folded) that ties to the top lifeline with a slip knot. This line ends in a monkey's fist or similar easily grabbed knot that hangs just above the water. Pulling on the line will deploy the ladder. One has to be clever in creating the slip knot so that it is not around the lifeline but rather slips off it.

There may be other ways to secure the ladder for quick release but this method works for us.

John
s/v Pelagic
1980 C37 Yawl (#22)
Lying Lake Union, Seattle WA
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Great points, all. I ended up ordering a Mystic Stainless 70" ladder with an extra set of track mounts so I'll be able to mount it on both sides as the need arises. I'll probably stow it at one of the mast pulpits when it won't be used for a while. And, I'll come up with some way to deploy it from the water such as mentioned by John.
By the way, John, my boat is currently at Yachtfitters, on Lake Union undergoing somewhat of a refit. Beautiful area. Later, it will be berthed in the San Francisco Bay.
 

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s/v Pelagic
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76 Posts
Bill,

Something to keep in mind is the hull curvature. We had to get some extension pieces so that the hull stand offs were the correct length for where the ladder is. They supplied these after we got the ladder and found it would not lay flat against the hull.

Also, we put rubber cane tips then tennis balls on these stand offs so the hull would be protected.

We walk right by Yachtfitters on the way to breakfast on Sundays so we'll look for Pristine tomorrow morning.

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for the tip, John. I'll be at Yachtfitters all of this coming week working on some of the projects. Stop by for a visit, if you can.
Bill
 
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