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Can anyone fill me in on this boat''s handling characteristics? (I have limited experience.) Also, do you have any hints/tips for inspection prior to purchase? Any ideas about the ideal, small boat, manageable by a woman who''s not into racing---just likes being out on the water?
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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I raced Bluejays as a kid. They were the primary Jr. trainer on Long Island Sound. They were typically sailed with crew weights of a couple hundred pounds of less. They were quite weight sensative: too much weight and they were really sluggish, to little weight and they were hard to keep level enough to be competetive enough in a breeze.

Even by the standard of the day they were quite heavy and a bit under canvassed and so were considered pretty slow. They pointed OK but were no match for boats like the Flying Jr. or a 420.

I don''t think two adults are light enough to race one competitively. I could be wrong but it seems like the older kids began to loose competetiveness at some point and moved on.

Still they make nice daysailors for an adult or two and would be fun to own in an envirnment with a bit more breeze than Long Island Sound.

BTW: Is your boat wood?

Good luck
Jeff
 

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The Blue Jay, designed by Sparkman & Stevens, is still the primary Jr. Trainer on Long Island Sound. We have about 100 of them at a regatta at our club each summer. It is a simple boat that works well as a trainer because it has a main, jib, and spinnaker and requires teamwork from the skipper and crew. Fast Opti sailors who move to the Laser get to the 420 and find themselves surprised by things like jibs, spinnakers, and having to coordinate with someone else in the boat. The Blue Jay''s hard chine and adequate, but not overly generous sailplan makes it a relatively stable platform for learners (quite unlike a 420). An adult will find that the size of the sails makes them easy to handle. If the spinnaker gets messed up, twisted, for example, it''s small enough for to stand up, grab the sail and and untwist. Shorter, (younger) hands would find such a maneuver more difficult. The fact that it is a known quantity means that when its time to sell again, there should be a market for one. Older boats may have leaks around the centerboard. I re-glassed ours this season. The keel can also have problems if the boat''s been trailered a lot or left with water in it on the trailer. (The weight or shock of bouncing on the trailer can damage the keel.) Also make sure the air tanks don''t leak too much. (Check the Blue Jay Class Association Website for more info.)

That said, you may find the Blue Jay a bit small for two adults. Something like a Rhodes 19 would give you similar stability, training and resale potential with enough room to invite some friends out with you. You''d also be able to put an engine on a larger boat without totally killing performance. If you look around in your area you will see what boats are there that fit in your niche and suit your needs-- and post again about that one.


ely stable ey''re hot suddenly find out
 

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Hi All
I know this an old thread but im about to buy a 1959 bluejay that was garage kept and sailed by the same family since 1963.
I was told that some repairs were made by a boat yard around the bottom at the centerboard trunk back in the 80's. it was said that before the repairs the centerboard would have to swell some for the boat to stop leaking?
from my research it says you can sail up to four people. that was until I read this thread. im 210 and my son is 40#. for awhile it will be just me sailing the boat.
This will be my first boat, I've been searching for several months and when I go to look at the Capri's, and other day sailors they look to be in rough shape. lots of cracked gel coat and worn rigging etc. and look to be to much of a potential project.
I'm limited on time and travel when it comes to looking at these boats. im kinda in a rural area near Clear Lake, CA. however this boat looks amazing and its close to me.
In Addition to all this I would like to add some type of flotation in case of capsize. and wonder about adding self-bailing ports if possible? and possible NiCad troll motor or a 2hp propane outboard.
The boat has documented history, trailer, outboard mount main sail, jibe, and spinnaker, and these present sails where purchased ten years ago. all this for a 1000 bucks. Even better, the owner will rig the boat and go over details with me. Does this sound like a decent deal?
Ill be boating on Lake Mendocino which is 3sq miles with winds each afternoon from the pacific ocean. I got the Bug to sail and never skippered a sail boat yet. I'm registered to take lessons down in Sausalito end of the month. And I'm finally a member of Sailnet! #bluejay
 
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